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Abenaki | Innu | Penobscot | Maliseet | Haudenosaunee | Wabanaki | Atikamekw
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Tete de Boule
Date: 1914-1930
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Abenaki materials in the Hallowell Papers are mostly located in Series V, Research Files, in folders labled "Abenaki" and Series VI, Photographs, Subseries E "St. Francis Abenaki Album." These include linguistic, ethnographic, ethnobotanical, ceremonial knowledge, information on political organization, and historical materials. Of particular interest are a sketch of Abenaki history from 1600-1930 accompanied by detailed notes from secondary sources on 17th century Abenaki history. The linguistic materials include an analysis of how the language changed after contact with Catholic missionaries, Abenaki vocabulary related to body parts, Abenaki phonetics, and religious, medical, and kinship terminology. The ethnobotanical materials include a manuscript labled "Identity of animals and plants," and information concerning herbal medicine and its practitioners. There is a wealth of ethnographic materials that include drawings of pipes, descriptions of games, baketry and birch bark maks. There is descriptions of Abenaki music and diagrams of dances, as well as detailed descriptions of hunting techniques. Some of the genealogical materials contains lists of community members names and descriptions of marriage. Interspered throughout the folders labled "Abenaki" in the Research Files are interlinear translations of stories such as "Man who could Find Lost Objects," "Woman and Bear Lover" and numerous other stories. The materials on hunting include topics such as the use of snow shoes, preparation of moose hide,and techniques and drawings of trapping. The collections contain important information designation hunting territories and family names. Four folders contain detailed informaiton on kinship terms. Two folders on Measurements and Genealogical data contain lists of names. The folders labled "Linguistics" in Series V contain scattered information about Abenaki grammar. In Series VI, of 160 photographs taken at St. Francis, Odanak in the Centre-du-Québec region. The Abenaki people in the photographs are identified, in most cases, and also include depictions of traditional dress, buildings, clothing, baskets, and a wide variety of material culture. The correspondence, in Series I, includes letters from Theophile Panadis; Gordon Day describing his collection of stories, recordings, vocabularies, and hunting territories. Henry Lorne Masta, one of Hallowell's Abenaki consultants, writes about culture and language. Additional correspondents may contain other Abenaki-related information.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Cree
Alternate forms: Nēhiyaw
Language(s): English | Cree, Plains
Date: 1925; Circa 1935; 1948; 1949;
Type:Text
Extent: 830 pages
Description: The Cree materials in the ACLS collection are Plains Cree materials predominantly from Saskatchewan and are located in the "Cree" section of the finding aid. "Cree texts, 'Series Two: Syllabary Texts from Sweet Grass Reserve,'" recorded by Harry Achenam of Sweetgrass Reserve (and previously attributed to Leonard Bloomfield), contains 67 unpublished stories written in Cree syllabics. The other primary materials are several items by Edward Ahenakew, written in English, concerning his family's genealogy, methods for tanning leather and building canoes, accounts of medicine practices and conjuring, and stories of little people, Wetikoo (or Wihtigo, Windigo), and other non-human beings. Many of these stories were given by various consultants such as Chief Starblanket of Ahtahkakoop, Jerry Constant, James Moostoos, and Susan Moostoos.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Dakota | Lakota
Alternate forms: Dakhota, Lakhota, Santee, Sioux, Teton, Yankton
Language(s): Dakota | English | Lakota
Date: 1838-1938 (bulk 1930s)
Type:Text
Extent: 7500+ pages, 3300+ slips; 2 notebooks
Description: The Dakota and Lakota materials in the ACLS collection consist of a very large and diverse set of materials, and are located in the "Dakota" section of the finding aid, which provides a detailed listing of all contents. The vast majority of these materials were composed and assembled by Ella Deloria during the 1930s, both recorded from contemporary speakers and from various historical manuscript sources, which were sent to Franz Boas. The bulk of Deloria's materials are stories and speeches in typewritten manuscript form, with a transcription in the original language, followed by a literal word-for-word translation, then a free translation in English, and a section of footnotes commenting upon the original text and translation decisions. Some of her manuscripts occasionally lack one or more of these sections. These texts cover a wide range of topics, from traditional narratives, historical accounts, autobiographical stories, descriptions of games, customs, ceremonies, etc., and speeches, often concerning political affairs and economic conditions from the late-19th century to the 1930s. Names of numerous speakers are also given in the manuscripts themselves. Some of these materials were published, but most were not. Note that Deloria identifies the language recorded by using the terms "Teton" for Lakota language, and "Santee" and "Yankton" to indicate Eastern and Western dialects of Dakota language. The collection also includes a much smaller amount of material by Boas and others, primarily consisting of linguistics notes and musical analysis. A full list of places where the material was recorded has not yet been assembled.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Atikamekw | Dene | Hopi | Makah | Inca | Yurok | Hupa | Yuki | Maidu | Miwok | Cahuilla | Mojave | Pomo | Chukchi | Kwakwaka'wakw | Nuu-chah-nulth | Salish | Maya | Ktunaxa | Arawak
Alternate forms: Athabaskan, Athapascan, Têtes-de-Boules, Têtes de Boules, Tete de Boule, Hoopa, Mohave, Kwakiutl, Nootka, Kutenai, Kootenai, Kootenay, Na:tini-xwe
Language(s): English
Date: 1920-1958
Type:Text
Description: Materials from a wide range of indigenous cultures around the world are scattered throughout Series V of the A. Irving Hallowell Papers. Hallowell was interested in comparative ethnology on a number of topics including Bear Ceremonialism, textiles, artistic representations of Native people, basketry, kinship, pre-history, the development of language, family and marriage, nets and netting, etc. Much of this material constitutes Hallowell's reading notes on secondary sources and his research for very broad-based studies of humanity. Geographic regions represented in Series V include Australia, Africa, Pacific Islands, Polar regions California, Northwest coast, Southwest, and Southeast. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a very interesting, brief description of Franz Boas' first visit to the Kwakwaka'wakw community of Fort Rupert by the daughter of George Hunt in a folder labled Ronald Rohmer. There is also a letter from Edward Sapir detailing Nuu-chah-nulth bear hunting and face painting as well as sketches of netting needles.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Heiltsuk
Alternate forms: Bella Bella, Haíɫzaqv
Date: circa 1923-1930
Extent: 2,219 slips; 5 notebooks; 175 pages; 243 pages
Description: The Heiltsuk materials in the ACLS collection are located in the "Bella Bella" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing. The majority of the materials were recorded or assembled by Franz Boas and George Hunt in the 1920s and consist predominantly of texts with interlinear translations (some in English only), lingusitic notes, and lexical files. The item "Bella Bella notes" (item 4) by Herman Haeberlin contains color drawings of numerous Heiltsuk masks with accompanying commentary in English.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Inuit
Alternate forms: Aivilik, Eskimo, Inuk, Inuttitut, Nunatsiavut
Date: 1883-1929
Extent: 184 pages; 2900 slips; 18 drawings
Description: The Inuit materials in the ACLS collection consists of several items in the "Eskimo" section of the finding aid. The core materials are Boas' fieldwork materials from Baffinland in 1883, his first fieldwork trip. "Eskimo ethnographic notes from Baffinland" includes vocabulary, texts, and ethnographic notes. "Eskimo texts" includes several text written in syllabic script, and includes other texts as well, some with interlinear translations, and additional vocabulary lists. This material comes from Hamilton Inlet (Labrador), Hudson Bay, and Cumberland Sound. "Eskimo interlinear texts" includes brief additional texts. Boas' "Eskimo lexicon" consists of an extensive German-Inuit vocabulary file of over 2900 slips. Boas' "Eskimo Songs" consists of song texts with translations. Lastly, "Eskimo folklore" consists of materials on stories, customs, and cooking and building methods, sent to Boas by George Comer, largely from the Southampton Island and Repulse Bay region. A table of content of the Comer materials is available upon request.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Inuit
Alternate forms: Eskimo
Date: 1883-1884
Extent: 2 notebooks, 1 folder
Description: The Inuit materials in the Boas Field Notebooks and Anthropometric Data collection consist of varied linguistic and ethnographic notes, some in German shorthand, as well as sketches, found in his "Baffinland diary" and "Baffinland notebook" from his first fieldwork trip in 1883-1884. See also his "Inuit Vocabularies and proper names," located in box 3.
Collection: Franz Boas early field notebooks and anthropometric data (Mss.B.B61.5)

Inuit
Alternate forms: Eskimo
Date: 1883-1884
Type:Text
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Inuit materials in the Franz Boas Professional Papers consist of approximately 11 folders, 3 diaries, 2 sketchbooks, and numerous maps and illustrations. Most of this material surrounds Boas' first fieldwork trip of his career to Baffin Island ("Baffinland") in 1883-1884. Under "Boas, Franz," most of this materials are labelled under "Arctic Expedition" or "Baffinland." These include Boas' diaries and sketchbooks, as well as typed translations of them. See also materials listed under "Weike, Wilhelm" for the diary of Boas' assistant during the expedition. The correspondence file for "Comer, George" contains additional information, as may other correspondence files.
Collection: Franz Boas Personal and Professional Papers (Mss.B.B61p)

Iñupiat
Alternate forms: Eskimo, Iñupiaq
Date: 1899; 1905; 1935
Extent: 50 pages; 18 drawings
Description: The Iñupiat materials in the ACLS collection consist of three items in the "Eskimo" section of the finding aid. Boas' "Comparative word list of Alaskan Eskimo, Siberian Eskimo, and Chukchee" includes vocabulary from Utqiagvik ("Point Barrow") and the Seward Peninsula. Alfred Francis' "Kungmit Eskimo vocabulary" consists of an approximately 300-word list recorded at Kotzebue, including terms for animals, kinship, parts of the body, natural objects, and other terms. Finally, Boas' "Drawings for 'Property Marks of Alaskan Eskimo'" includes drawing from which illustrations for Boas' 1899 article on this topic were made.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Nlaka'pamux
Alternate forms: Thompson
Language(s): English | Nlaka'pamuctsin
Date: 1885, 1898-1918
Extent: 1000+ loose pages, 500+ slips, 23 notebooks, 1 map
Description: The Nlaka'pamux materials in the ACLS collection are located primarily in the "Thompson" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing. They consist predominantly of ethnographic, historical, linguistic, and botanical materials recorded and assembled by James Teit from the 1890s to the 1910s and sent to Boas. Many of the material listed in the finding aid, especially those of larger size, are composed of many shorter, distinct individual manuscripts on specific topics that were gathered together into the large sets of manuscripts and assigned general titles such as "Thompson materials" or "Salish ethnographic materials." Many additional Nlaka'pamux materials can also be found in the "Salish" section of the finding aid, often intermixed among information on neighboring Interior Salish peoples. In both of these sections there are also some additional materials, generally linguistic, by Franz Boas and others.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)