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Aymara | Quechua
Language(s): English | Aymara | Spanish
Date: 1950-1972
Description: The Aymara materials in the Lounsbury Papers consist of comparative linguistics and studies of kinship in Series II. Of particular interest are the audio recordings in Series VII on the folklore of the Ayar Incas. The correspondence, in Series I, contains information of the geographic distribution of the language, Lounsbury's analysis of the language and its relationship to Quechua, Christian scriptures in Aymara, Morris Swadesh's work on genetic classification of Native American languages, and geographic distribution of Aymara population.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Swiss
Language(s): German | English | German, Walser
Date: 1917-1962
Extent: 2.5 linear feet
Description: Between around 1948 and 1950, Amelia Susman did fieldwork in Brienz, Switzerland, documenting the local variety of Highest Allemanic German as well as the social and economic organization of the village and surrounding areas. This is all contained within Series I. Of particular note are a reel-to-reel tape and some associated transcriptions, a set of 13 field notebooks, a lexical file, topically-arranged ethnographic notes, some correspondence with consultants (scattered throughout), and preparatory materials for several publications.
Collection: Amelia Susman Schultz Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.171)

Hupa
Alternate forms: Na:tini-xwe
Language(s): Hupa | English
Date: 1950-1962
Extent: 0.75 linear feet
Description: Haas' Hupa file is mostly comprised of published and unpublished work by others, most notably Mary Woodward and Edward Sapir. Series 1 includes correspondence with both Mary Woodward and Victor Golla on Hupa fieldwork and research. Chimariko and Hupa card files in Series 9 include lexica, phonological analysis and ethnographic notes, and are derived from work by Sapir and Woodward, including transcriptions by Woodward herself. Haas' Yurok field notebook in Series 2 includes a 12-page Hupa section with consultants Ned Jackson and Sam Brown, consisting of a basic lexicon and some grammatical paradigms. There are also some additional morphological and phonological analyses in the same series with notes from an unidentified author (possibly Woodward), and Haas made use of Hupa as an exercise in phonological reconstruction. Copies of materials housed at the Berkeley Language Center are also present in Series 10, and have been digitized, available at the APS Digital Library.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Seminole
Language(s): Mikasuki | English | Muscogee
Date: 1930s-1982
Subject: Linguistics
Extent: 1.0 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas' Mikasuki language materials consist mostly of works by others, drafts and annotated versions of which can be found in Series 2 Subseries 'Mikasuki', along with fairly extensive notes by Haas on Mikasuki tone. In the 1930s Haas documented brief lexica with George Tiger and Ida Mary Bearhead, found in a field notebook containing many other languages in Series 2 Subseries 'Multiple languages'. In 1951, Mary Haas worked with William Sturtevant and speakers including Joseph Jumper to document Mikasuki, the originals of which are held at the Berkeley Language Center (Series 10). Further audio recordings of either Mikasuki or Muscogee were made at the Seminole Bilingual Project in 1973-1974 (a separate entry exists for this fieldwork, as well as for the much more extensive Muscogee materials, with which Mikasuki is often identified). There are also sizable lexical slip files from work by John David West and William Sturtevant in Series 9.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Seminole
Language(s): English | Muscogee | Mikasuki
Date: 1940s-1970s (bulk 1973-1974)
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: This entry refers only to Seminole cultural materials. For linguistic materials, see Creek and Mikasuki entries. In 1973-1974, Mary Haas visited the Seminole Bilingual Project in Ada, Oklahoma, making extensive of audio recordings of the meetings of the project (Series 10, all available in the Digital Library), and attending and photographing ceremonies (Series 11). Haas also acquired a number of books from the Seminole Bilingual Project, and made notes on the language variety spoken in Seminole County, Oklahoma, from the same trip, all found in Series 2 Subseries 'Creek'. Additionally there are occasional offprints and drafts of others' papers on Florida Seminole.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Shasta
Language(s): Shasta | English | Karuk
Date: 1950, undated
Extent: 0.1 linear feet
Description: William Bright made several audio recordings with Sargent Sambo in 1950 of Coyote tales, and a vocabulary, which can be found in Series 6. Among his other works, he was concerned with Shasta orthography, and developed a proposal for a new version, and derived lexica from others' published sources and archival notes (Series 4).
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Shawnee
Language(s): English | Shawnee | Miami-Illinois
Date: circa 1925-1967
Extent: 95 folders, 12 boxes, 1 reel
Description: There is a significant amount of Shawnee material in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. Materials are in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II. In Subcollection I, there are 4 boxes of Shawnee note cards (mostly vocabulary) and 2 folders of document notes (mostly linguistic notes, regarding transitive verbs, stems, phonology, etc.) in Series II. Card Files. Subseries III-A: Works Translated by Voegelin of Series III. Works by Voegelin contains two Shawnee texts that were translated and/or linguistically analyzed by Voegelin and which served as the basis of publications by Voegelin in the early 1950s: "Shawnee Episodes" (5 folders) and "Shawnee Laws" (44 folders of material) [see the finding aid for detailed descriptions of these materials]. Subseries III-B: Works Authored by Voegelin (also of Series III) contains files labeled "Basic Shawnee" and "Shawnee Morphology." There is a folder of linguistic notes (including a story in English) in "[Shawnee?]" and a list of tribal names in "Shawnee" in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-A. Language Names. There is a file of "Unique Shawnee Texts" containing Mary Williams' responses to "English Through Pictures" in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-B: Texts. There are 37 Shawnee notebooks in Series VI. Notebooks. The notebooks date to 1934 and primarily contain texts, including many about the life of a consultant identified as F. D., "the way it used to be," and the way life was more recently in 1934 in Oklahoma. Most of the notebooks are accompanied by handwritten notes and typescripts of transcriptions in Shawnee and translations in English. Shawnee is also represented on the language maps created for Voegelin's publications on Algonquian languages in Series VII. Photographs, and there is a reel of Shawnee audio recording (a reading of the transcript of "Shawnee Laws") in Series VIII. Recordings [This item has been digitized and is available through the APS Digital Library]. In Subcollection II, there is relevant correspondence with Leonard Bloomfield (regarding Shawnee work with Mary Williams) in Series I. Correspondence; 2 folders of Shawnee grammatical notes made by working with Mary Williams, a folder of miscellaneous Shawnee notes, and 2 folders of Shawnee texts (26 texts in Shawnee and English, and additional material) in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries III. Macro-Algonquian; and 8 boxes of Shawnee linguistic materials in Series V. Card Files.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Nahua
Date: ca.1970-2002
Extent: 6 linear feet
Description: The majority of the Jane M. Rosenthal Papers centers on Nahuatl linguistic and anthropological research. Materials therefore appear extensively in every series. Rosenthal's own fieldwork on Tlaxcaltec (Acxotla del Monte, Tlaxcala, Mexico) spanned the 1970s and 1980s, involving the production of 17 field notebooks (Series 2 Subseries 1) with accompanying tapes (Series 10, available in the Digital Library), lexical slips (Series 7), photographs (Series 8) and much correspondence, in Spanish, with members of the Atonal and de Texis families (Series 1). Jane Hill also conducted research with many of the same consultants, works by whom (including interview transcriptions) can be found mostly in Series 5. Rosenthal also engaged with preexisting primary sources at archives in Mexico and the U.S., creating transcriptions and interlinearizations of texts (Series 2 Subseries 2), and produced several articles on Nahuatl grammar, Nahua culture and interactions with missions (Series 2 Subseries 3). Further to her own work, this collection contains much gathered material by others. In addition to that of Jane and Kenneth Hill, several drafts and publications by fellow University of Chicago student Kay A. Read on Nahua/Aztec religion appear in Series 5, and publications and commentary with other Uto-Aztecanists are scattered throughout Series 1 and 5. Rosenthal was heavily involved in the meetings of the Friends of Uto-Aztecan from its inception in 1973, many handouts from which (relating to a variety of Uto-Aztecan languages) can be found in Series 6. Her student notes, many produced by Norman McQuown (Series 3), and teaching notes (Series 4) may also be of interest.
Collection: Jane M. Rosenthal Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.129)

Yurok
Language(s): Yurok | English
Date: ca.1950-1963
Extent: 0.75 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas conducted fieldwork in the early 1950s on Yurok music and language, tapes of which can be found in Series 10, and a brief field notebook with “Mrs. Roberts” in Series 2. In 1958, with the publication of the article “Algonkian-Ritwan: The End of a Controversy”, Mary Haas used her materials on Yurok, Wiyot and Algonquian languages to make a case for their genetic relationship. The vast majority of the remaining Yurok materials in Mary Haas' collection relate to this, including extensive comparative and standalone lexical card files (Series 9) and some correspondence (Series 1).
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)