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Comanche | Pawnee | Tonkawa | Wichita
Language(s): English
Date: April 2, 1812
Type:Text
Extent: 4 pages
Description: Original in Missouri Historical Society, Sibley Papers. Sibley (Indian agent at Nachitoches) mentions Spanish-Indian conflict, naming Hietans, Tankaways, Comanches, Tanakenos, and Panies. Bad behavior of American troops. He has journal and maps of George the Factor from a trip to the Kansas and Pawnees, during which he experienced the earthquakes. Worries about becoming a state and French majority without annexation of West Florida.
Collection: Zebulon Montgomery Pike biographical materials (Mss.B.P63)

Language(s): English
Date: Undated
Type:Text
Extent: 2 pages
Description: Letter to John L. LeConte describing cave with Indian hieroglyphs and other comments on an exploring expedition [possibly the Sitgreaves Expedition (1851)].
Collection: John L. (John Lawrence) LeConte papers (Mss.B.L493)

Inuit
Alternate forms: Eskimo
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1850-1857
Extent: .5 linear feet
Description: Philadelphia-born adventurer Elisha Kent Kane is perhaps best remembered for his involvement in both the First and Second Grinnell Expeditions (1850-1851 and 1853-1855, respectively) in search of lost Arctic explorer Sir John Franklin. The Elisha Kent Kane Papers also deal with Kane's other travels (to China, Africa, Mexico, etc.) as well as his rather scandalous personal life. During his time in the Arctic, Kane observed local Inuit peoples, and as an incessant doodler he created hundreds of images as well as textual records. Kane's observations of Inuits are located primarily in Series IV. Bound Volumes and Series V. Graphics. Series IV includes a notebook, a letterbook (with sketches, including images of Inuits kayaking), a logbook, a notebook of specimens located in the Arctic, a meteorological journal, and a diary from the First Grinnell Expedition, and two volumes of notebooks (with meteorological observations and sketches) from the Second Grinnell Expedition. Series V contains over 200 sketches, watercolors, silhouettes, maps, and engravings of Inuits of Baffin Bay drawn by Kane during both arctic expeditions. Primarily from the first trip, images include portraits of individuals in native attire, landscapes, dwellings, hunting tools, kayaks, and encampments. As noted above, Kane's log and notebooks are also dotted throughout with sketches. Of note in the Graphics series is a watercolor of an Inuit boy netting auks. Kane's published works, "The United States Grinnell expedition in search of Sir John Franklin (1853)" and "Arctic explorations: the second expedition…(1857)," include engravings of all his original drawings. These images are referenced in the sketch file, the finding aid contains a detailed inventory, and some have been digitized and are part of the APS Digital Library. There might also be some Inuit-related material in Series I. Correspondence and Series III. George W. Corner, Notes on Elisha Kent Kane. Corner prepared a biography of Kane, and this series includes copies of letters and documents relating to Kane and his expeditions held in other libraries, as well as some of Corner's notes and drafts of writings on Kane, including a copy of A.F.C. Wallace, "An interdisciplinary approach to mental disorder among the Polar Eskimos of Northwest Greenland."
Collection: Elisha Kent Kane Papers (Mss.B.K132)

Inuit
Alternate forms: Eskimo
Language(s): English
Date: 1908-1929
Extent: 3 folders
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. There are Inuit (formerly Eskimo) materials located in Series I. Trait Files. These include Folder "A:974 x 98. Caucasian x Eskimo" (1927), which contains correspondence (with sketches) of Herbert B. Wentz, M.D. to Harry H. Laughlin of the Eugenics Research Association, largely about the occurence of pigmentation in children of white and Native parents, but also with Wentz's descriptions of the unfair treatment toward Native Alaskans in medicine, education, and the reindeer industry. Folder "A:979 x 80. Caucasian - Eskimo" (1919) contains a single, brief anecdotal paragraph about an Inuit woman married to a white man. Folder "A:9798. Eskimos" (1908-1929) contains several newspaper clippings and articles (from Harpers, World's Work, The Literary Digest, The New York Times, etc.) relating to the Inuit, including Vilhjalmr Stefansson's article "Wintering Among the Eskimos"; newspaper clippings showing Mrs. Frank E. Kleinschmidt sharing a meal with Inuit women and children, Mrs. Kleinschmidt with an Inuit hunter, and an Inuit girl; Robert J. Flaherty's article "Wetalltooks' Islands: How the Remarkable Information and Native Map of One Wetalltook, an Esquimo, Suggested the Belcher Island Expedition" (with photos); Flaherty's article "How I Flimed 'Nanook of the North'" (with photos); "Knud Rasmussen's Artic Odyssey: The First of Two Articles by the Leader of the Fifth Thule Expedition" (with photos); William A. Thomas's "Health of a Carnivorous Race: A Study of the Eskimo"; a New York Times spread on Earl Rossman's expedition in Nunivak (with photos); Stefansson's "The 'Blond' Eskimos"; "Eskimos Under their Skin, as seen by Rasmussen" (with photos); and three pages of references to mentions of Eskimos in medical journals, two from the Journal of Immunology, Baltimore and one from Ugeskrift for Laeger, Copenhagen.
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Arikara | Dakota | Cheyenne | A'aninin | Mandan | Omaha | Pawnee | Ponca
Alternate forms: Sioux, Gros Ventre
Language(s): French
Date: 1794-1796
Type:Text
Extent: 1 reel
Description: "Description abrègée du Haut-Missouri adressé: a Monsieur don Zénon Trudeau," an account of a journey up the Missouri River, with descriptions of the life and manners of the Indian tribes, prepared for Don Zenon Trudeau, Lieutenant Governor of the Country East of the Illinois (n.d., [after 1795]). Extracts from journals, June 7, 1794-June 1796 (part printed from copy in Department of State Archives, Washington), 190 pages. Approximately 200 pages of letters. Materials contain descriptions of the culture of the Plains Indians (Cheyenne, Arikara, Mandan, Pawnee, Gros Ventres, Sioux, Poncas), dress, customs, marriage, birth; calumet dance, sun dance, buffalo dance; warfare. Printed (in English translation), Trudeau (1914) and (1912) and Abel (1921). Original in possession of the Seminaire de Quebec.
Collection: Journal among the Arikara Indians, and other papers, 1794-1796 (Mss.Film.1036)

Miami | Omaha
Language(s): English
Date: 1823; 1824; 1829; undated
Type:Text
Extent: 5 items
Description: Two letters to Zaccheus Collins: (1) regarding antiquities along banks of the Cumberland River, Kentucky. He offers the American Philosophical Society his maps and descriptions of monuments of Kentucky, his list of sites, his discussion of ancient history, chronology, and a history of the Indian nations for publication as a sequel to Heckewelder (1819). Mentions comparative numerals, comparative vocabularies. (2) Has published on antiquities in American Monthly, May, 1824; preparing a large work on early American history and antiquities. (3) Letter to John Quincy Adams regarding the ancient history, antiquities and languages of America; Vocabularies deposited in the State or War Department, particularly of Lewis and Clark, Pike, and Dunbar. (4) Reading notes from various works. Discussion of South American words, particularly Chilean and Venezuelan. Miscellaneous information about Miami chief, Francis Godfrey; Stapa-Tunga, chief of the Omahas. Mentions the Galapagos. (5) A notebook with discussion of various sources for study of the North and South American continents, concerning works of history, geology, physiography, botany. Chronology taken from Humboldt. Problem of identifying nations at early contact.
Collection: C. S. (Constantine Samuel) Rafinesque correspondence and writings (Mss.B.R124)

Language(s): English
Date: 1805-1838
Type:Text
Extent: 6 items
Description: Materials relating to Northwest Coast languages and cultures at the American Philosophical Society. Topics include APS support for John Kirk Townsend's expedition [to Oregon, with botonist Thomas Nuttall, the second western expedition of Boston entrepreneur Nathaniel J. Jarvis]; Captain Swift's [of Boston] observations of indigenous peoples of the Northwest Coast; Lieutenant Sylvanus W. Godon's return from U.S. exploring expedition aboard the Peacock, a gift of vocabularies, and the gift of Northwest Coast Indian pipe to John Vaughan; a draft letter to Samuel G. Morton signed by Titian Peale regarding the division of materials from Townsend's expedition between American Philosophical Society and Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia; a letter from Morton stating that the Academy of Natural Sciences didn't subscribe to Townsend's expedition and consequently has no claim on his collections; and Townsend's letter to John Vaughan transmitting Northwest Coast Indian vocabularies--the originals have been given to the APS and have also been rearranged and transcribed for Du Ponceau, and Nuttall has a copy of four or five vocabularies. Geological specimens and shells selected by Titian R. Peale also transmitted.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Osage
Language(s): English
Date: 1861
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Letters to Charles Waterton. Mentions imposture of John D. Hunter [who claimed to have lived among the Kickapoos and Osages], Hunter's work on Indians, his claim to have preceded Lewis and Clark, and Ord's conversation with Sir John Franklin on the topic; Du Chaillu and his work on gorillas; Eleazar Williams and his claim to be the Lost Dauphin; Indian customs; Academy of Natural Sciences; fire in Philadelphia. Also quotes Lewis Cass on Hunter and Franklin.
Collection: George Ord Collection (Mss.B.Or2)

Osage
Language(s): English
Date: January 13, 1826; March 13, 1958
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Du Ponceau to Marc Antoine Jullien de Paris regarding Cass' article in the North American Review exposing John D. Hunter as a fraud; had stated privately that this was the case in 1822. Encloses news clipping of anonymous letter (by Du Ponceau) of 1822 which exposes Hunter on linguistic grounds. [N.B. Du Ponceau had been fooled by Hunter in New York, but had found he lacked knowledge of Osage in later visit to Philadelphia.] Anderson to Carl P. Russell regarding plan of Fort Osage in original of Clark's diary [#2607] and location of other Clark items dealing with Fort Osage.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Ho-Chunk | Shoshone | Crow | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | A'aninin
Alternate forms: Winnebago, Shoshoni, Kansa, Sioux, Minnetaree, Gros Ventre
Language(s): English
Date: 1806-1892
Type:Text
Extent: 7 items
Description: Correspondence regarding Plains Indian materials. Includes Thomas Jefferson's letter to John Vaughan transmitting a copy of his "communications to Congress of the information respecting Louisiana..." [Jefferson (1806)]; Du Ponceau's request for a copy of the first two pages of Journal historique from original in Department of State; Du Ponceau to Johann S. Vater concerning Indian vocabularies brought in by Major Long, which are being copied into his book, where he now has 25 vocabularies (notes that Long lost others when baggage men deserted to the Indians); John C. Calhoun's instructions for Long's Missouri expedition (Long urged to pacify and conciliate Indians, get information as to their number and character, fill in vocabulary forms, and follow Jefferson's instructions to Lewis [Printed (in part), James (1823): 3-5]; Ferdinand V. Hayden's observations on the Indian history of the Colorado region, including use of stone arrow points by the Pawnees, earth huts of Indians along Missouri River, use of stone implements, and his belief that Digger Indians of Nevada are most degraded [Printed, Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 10: 352-353]; Daniel G. Brinton's letter to Henry Phillips desiring a copy of Hayden's article on Missouri Tribes for Horatio Hale; and Rev. T.W. Smith's inquiry about a paper on Sign language [See also Dunbar (1809)]. Other Native American groups mentioned include Winnebago, Shoshoni, Upsaroko or Crow, Wahtoktatas, Kanzas, Omahas, Yankton Sioux, Pawnee (Panis), Minnetaree (Gros Ventre), and Sioux.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)