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Cayuga | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: August 12, 1852
Contributor: Hall, B.F.
Type:Text
Extent: 3 pages
Description: Letter to Ely S. Parker, from a superintendent of the Thomas Indian School writing at the suggestion of a Mr. Thompson for confirmation of an Iroquois tradition concerning Logan, a Cayuga chief, to whose memory it is proposed to erect a monument near his birthplace. Brantz Mayer, President of the Maryland Historical Society, "in an effort to redeem the character of the Cresap family, with which he has connections," has contradicted facts of Logan's life long held true. [See #1766 for reply.]
Collection: Ely Samuel Parker Papers (Mss.497.3.P223)

Cayuga | Seneca-Cayuga | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1795, 1949, and undated
Extent: 3 folders
Description: The Cayuga materials in the Snyderman Papers include correspondence from Alexander General (Deskaheh) in Series I concerning "Cayuga Legends Explaining Conquest of Huronia," and a map of the Cayuga reservation from 1795 in Series II and a "Preliminary Report of the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma" manuscript in Series IV.
Collection: George S. Snyderman Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.51)

Cayuga | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1917, 1934-1989
Type:Text
Extent: .5 linear feet
Description: The Cayuga materials in the William Fenton Papers can be found in multiple sections of the finding aid. In Series I, see correspondence with "General, Chief and Mrs. Alex." Additional information may be included in other correspondences. In Series IIb, see especially "A Cayuga League Tradition." Series III includes the manuscripts "Howard Sky, 1900-1971: Cayuga Faith-Keeper, Gentleman, and Interpreter of Iroquois Culture" and "Installing a Cayuga Chief in 1945." Series IV includes Kurath's diary "Report on Cayuga Soursprings Longhouse Midwinter Festival." Series V includes Fenton's notes on "Deskaheh on Cayuga Council." In Series VI, there are photos of "Cayuga nomination strings" In Series VIII-B, see the "Iroquois Social Structure" section and in Series VIII-D see the "Cayuga Social Organization" folder with information on Myron Turkey. Additional Cayuga-related materials may be found in other folders not currently identified as Cayuga.
Collection: William N. Fenton papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.20)

Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1714-1747, bulk 1745-1747
Type:Text
Extent: 1 reel, 200 pages
Description: These papers include 140 pages of letters, council minutes of Indian conferences, petitions, and speeches, concerning the activities of the New York Assembly and the Six Nations, principally for 1745-1747. Also contains a 200-page addendum of papers of the Van Shack (Van Schaak)family, pertaining to the same subjects. Table of contents included. From originals at the New York Historical Society.
Collection: Daniel Horsmanden selected papers, 1714-1747, relating to the Six Nations (Mss.Film.640)

Onondaga | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1850-1855
Type:Text
Extent: 32 items
Description: "Letters of Onondaga Indians." Letters from two young Christian Onondaga Indians, Thomas La Fort and Jameson L. Thomas, about their efforts to get an education so they might help their tribe; from Chief David Hill, leader of the Christian Onondagas, asking for financial and political aid when the New York state legislature refused money for a school on the Onondaga reservation, and when the Christian and traditionalist factions sought to divide the reservation between them. Letters are itemized, with brief descriptions, in the guide to the Ebenezer Meriam Correspondence.
Collection: Ebenezer Meriam correspondence (Mss.970.3.On1)

Language(s): English
Date: 1757-1758
Type:Text
Extent: 3 items
Description: Two 1757 letters to Major James Burd reporting on theatre of war: French and Indian raiding parties at Colonel Dunbar's old camp; French and Indians have road from Albany; Indians at Shippensburg; Governor Delancey of New York on march with militia to relieve Fort William Henry, infested with French, Canadians, and Indians. Also "Declaration of Martin Discentio," in which a soldier of Captain DuVitier's [i.e., deVitri or Charles Aubry, see Hunter (1960): 134] tells of Fort Duquesne and departure of French officers and 300 Indians for attack on English [under James Burd] near Loyalhanna, October 12, 1758.
Collection: Burd-Shippen Papers (Mss.B.B892)

Haudenosaunee | Tuscarora | Seneca | Cayuga | Mohawk | Oneida | Onondaga
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1668-1990, bulk circa 1936-1974
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history, among other interests. Haudenosaunee materials include items relating to Wallace's particular interests in the Tuscarora and the Seneca, and can be difficult to disentangle from items organized by subject, such as personality, religion, and cultural revitalization. Researchers should therefore also see the Wallace Papers entries for the Tuscarora and Seneca, and consult the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's career and for an itemized list of the collection's contents. Materials explicitly linked to the Haudenosaunee can be found throughout Series I. Correspondence, especially in the correspondence with William N. Fenton, Merle H. Deardorff, Francis Jennings, Mina Brayley Smith, and Wallace's father, historian Paul A. W. Wallace. Other relevant correspondence files include those for Aren Akweks (Ray Fadden), the American Philosophical Society, Michael Ames, Edmund Snow Carpenter, Dwight Lewis, Chamberlain, Malcolm Collier, Charles Congdon, Jesse Cornplanter, Robert T. Coulter, Myrtle Crouse, Norma Cuthbert, Hazel Dean-John, Vine Deloria, Michael K. Foster, John F. Freeman, Joseph Chamberlain Furnas, Bob Gabor, Charles Garrad, C. Marshall Gorman, Randy Gorske, Barbara Graymont, Jeannette Henry, N. Perry Jemison, Francis Jennings, Randy Alan John, Gertrude Kurath, Weston La Barre, David Landry, Gardiner Lindzey, Floyd G. Lounsbury, Franklin O. Loveland, Charles Lucy, Nancy Lurie, Benjamin Malzberg, Henry Manley, Jane Ann McGettrick, Ernest Miller, Stephen Murray, Oscar Nephew, New York State Library, Niagara County Historical Society, Arthur Caswell Parker, Arthur Piepkorn, Richard Pilant, Susan Postal, V. R. Potmis, Frederic Pryor, Martha Randle, Paul G. Reilly, Egon Renner, Alex and Catherine H. Ricciardelli, Cara Richards, Sally M. Rogow, Anne Marie Shimony, John Sikes, Florence Smith, Mrs. Douglas Snook, Patricia Snyder-Freeman, Frank Speck, George Dearborn Spindler, William Sturtevant, Elizabeth Tooker, Eula Tottingham, Allen W. Trelease, University of Pennsylvania Press, Shirley Vanatta, A. Jeanne Weissinger, C. A. Weslager, and Susan Williams. There is also a great deal on Haudenosaunee peoples in Series II. Research Notes and Drafts, particularly relating to Wallace's monographs on the Tuscarora and Seneca. Subseries A. Indian Research primarily contains Haudenosaunee-related materials, including notes and field notes from research trips to Iroquoia and to archives, copies of and extracts from primary and secondary sources, notes on what Wallace called his "Iroquois Research Project," field notes and materials compiled by Paul A. W. Wallace, etc. There is also some Haudenosaunee material in Subseries B. Revitalization and Culture, mostly in form of secondary sources, including "History of the St. Regis Reservation and several Iroquois pamphlets and drawings" by Mohawk Aren Akweks (aka). Series III. Notecards contains index cards with notes on primary and secondary sources on a range of topics, including Wallace's research interests in revitalization, culture and personality, and his work on Indian land claims, all of which touch on the Haudenosaunee. Several drafts of Wallace's work on the Haudenosaunee and other indigenous peoples can be found in Series IV. Works by Wallace A. Professional, along with fictional works in B. Creative Writing and C. Juvenilia of the same series. Series VI. Consulting and Committee Work A. American Anthropological Association contains two folders labeled "Iroquois Wampum," which contain materials relating to Onondaga demands for the return of wampum belts held by the New York State Museum. Wallace publicly supported the Haudenosaunee, in direct opposition to many scholars, including his friend William Fenton, who argued that the NYSM had saved and maintained the belts and should continue in that role. Correspondence, drafts of Wallace's statement, and other items reveal many factors at play: Vine Deloria, Jr.'s involvement; Haudenosaunee youth involved in the red power movement; inter-tribal divisions about the fate of the belts; scholarly disagreement about how best to serve both Native and non-Native members of the public; ideas about the roles of museums in preserving and protecting cultural materials; anxieties about the implications of Wallace's stance for ethnological museum collections in general; the legal dimensions of deaccessioning bequests; and more. [See Wallace's correspondence with Fenton and others in Series I. Correspondence for more on this issue.] Subseries C. Other Committees of the same series includes files on the Iroquois Conference 1946-1961. Series IX. Indian Claims contains over 50 folders of research materials, dockets, trial memoranda, etc., relating to Wallace's work as an expert witness for Haudenosaunee land claims. Series XI. Maps also contains materials pertaining to Haudenosaunee land claims, as well as to Wallace's personal research. Finally, Series XII. Graphics includes watercolor paintings by Ray Fadden's (Mohawk, aka Aren Akweks) son John (Mohawk, aka Ka-Hon-Hes), original drawings by Seneca Jesse Cornplanter and Tuscarora Nellie Gansworth, and photographs associated with Paul A.W. Wallace's fieldwork among the Indians of Pennsylvania, New York State, and Ontario as well as Anthony F.C. Wallace's research (1947-1985) on American Indians including several photographs of Tuscaroras, Senecas, a cradleboard, and pictographs. Additional material may be found in other places in the collections.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)

Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1815-1945
Type:Text
Extent: 25 items
Description: Various materials relating to Haudenosaunee people, culture, history, and language. Correspondence includes a typed copy of a 1815 letter from Haudenosaunee chiefs to the Secretary of War listing losses in the War of 1812; Daniel Webster thanking Parker for a gift copy of Morgan's "League of the Iroquois"; letters pertaining to Parker's assistance to both fiction and non-fiction writers such as Lewis Henry Morgan, Anna C. Campbell, Alfred B. Street, Charles Talbot Porter, etc.; William Cornwall's suggestion that the Haudenosaunee still own the Thousand Islands on the Canadian side of the border; letters pertaining to the New York Indians in Kansas Territory prosecuting claims under treaties of 1838 and 1842; Parker to B.F. Hall regarding "traditional history" of Chief Logan [see also #557]; and Parker to the President of the United States requesting that Peter Wilson be continued as interpreter for the New York Indian agency. Other items include a fragment of Ely Parker's "History of the government, manners, customs...(of the Iroquois Confederacy)"; his mutilated manuscript describing "a Grand Council of the Six Nations of New York, held at Tonawanda for the purpose of hearing again their religious code, from Jimmy Johnson, the Grand High Priest of the Iroquois Confederacy"; his "Initiation of the Wolf tribe of the Cayuga nation, one of the confederate nations of the Grand Confederacy of Iroquois"; other notes, extracts, and short essays by Ely Parker on Haudenosaunee-related topics; Caroline Parker's school essay on Handsome Lake; three chapters of Arther Caswell Parker's unpublished manuscript, "Red Embers of the Longhouse"; Asher Wright's memo book on the Council of the Six Nations held at Cattaraugus (December 1, 1862); Edward Ehlers' address suggesting similarities between Iroquois Longhouse and Masonic Lodge symbolism; and Peter Wilson's talk on Haudenosaunee history before the New York Historical Society.
Collection: Ely Samuel Parker Papers (Mss.497.3.P223)

Haudenosaunee | Stockbridge-Munsee | Seneca
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Stockbridge
Language(s): English
Date: 1795
Type:Text
Extent: 142 pages
Description: Materials compiled by Pennsylvania Quaker missionary Halliday Jackson. Titled "Negotiations with the Indians of Pennsylvania by the Society of Friends to 1795," this assemblage contains a census of Native groups; miscellaneous information about various Native peoples; a verbatim collection of previous speeches and messages to and from various Native groups; letters from Timothy Pickering, Jasper Parrish [or Parish], and Isadore Chapin; and a discussion of various Iroquoian, Stockbridge, Brotherton, etc., peoples. Mention of Connediu (Handsome Lake). Original in possession of Historical Society of Pennsylvania.
Collection: Halliday Jackson journal, 1814 (Mss.Film.631b)

Anishinaabe | Haudenosaunee | Oneida | Mohawk | Seneca | Shawnee | Miami | Odawa
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Odawa
Language(s): English
Date: 1749-1759
Type:Text
Extent: 19 items
Description: Various items relating to Haudenosaunee-Pennsylvania relations, largely in the 1750s. Topics include need for colonial governments to renew the covenant chain; death of Tanaghrisson (Seneca, also called the Half King) suspected to be witchcraft; the diplomatic work of Scarroyady (Oneida, also called Monacatootha and the Half King), especially as a go-between between the Six Nations and Pennsylvania; the Albany Plan of Union; a conference with Caughnawagas [Kahnawakes] and negotiations for the redemption of an Indian held prisoner by the Caughnawagas; drunken conduct of Andrew Montour; Conrad Weiser's dealings with the family of Shickellamy (Oneida); John Lidieus's purchase of Susquehanna lands from the Six Nations for Connecticut; George Croghan's meeting at Logstown with Six Nations and Shawnees; a document prepared for Governor Hamilton listing events, letters, resolutions, and behavior of Miamis and other Indians toward Six Nations, Ohio lands, etc.; 1754 appointment of John Penn, Richard Peters, Benjamin Franklin as Commissioners of Pennsylvania to a list of Six Nations Indians present at the 1758 Treaty of Easton; and Christian Frederick Post on Indian character.
Collection: Indian and Military Affairs of Pennsylvania, 1737-1775 (Mss.974.8.P19)