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Shawnee | Lenape | Potawatomi | Meskwaki | Menominee | Cree | Ojibwe | Blackfoot | Cheyenne | Ktunaxa | Penobscot | Mi'kmaq
Alternate forms: Lenape, Fox, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Micmac
Date: circa 1930s-1960s
Extent: 25 folders, 1 box
Description: There are many materials relating to Algonquian languages in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. This entry is intended as a catch-all for materials labeled as Algonquian or Macro-Algonquian, or having to do with several Algonquian languages in a general way. Researchers should also view the entries for specific Algonquian languages and culture groups. Algonquian materials are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II. In Subcollection I, there is relevant correspondence with Leonard Bloomfield (regarding an inscription on a silver bracelet; Bloomfield's "Menomini Grammar"), Charles Hockett (with questions about Voegelin's article on Delaware and examples from other Algonquian languages), and Morris Swadesh (including a brief Stockbridge vocabulary and a slip of Moravian Delaware) in Series I. Correspondence; 1 box of comparative Algonquian vocabulary and grammar in Series II. and several linguistic maps (i.e., "Algonquian language text with illustrations" and "Linguistic classification of the Southern New England Algonquians"), particularly of the Potawatomi, Delaware, and Shawnee, to accompany the texts of Voegelin's work on Algonquian languages, in Series VII. Photographs. In Subcollection II, there is relevant correspondence from Eric Hamp (to Ives Goddard regarding preparation of Arapaho and Algonquian works) and Frank Speck (to Edward Sapir regarding his work on Mi'kmaq and other northern Algonquian languages and societies) in Series I. Correspondence. There is also an entire subseries devoted to Macro-Algonquian: Subseries III. Macro-Algonquian of Series II. Research Notes. This subseries contains a grammatical sketch of Algonquian by Leonard Bloomfield (135 pages of typescript with handwritten edits and 7 interleaved pages of notes by Voegelin); another "Sketch of Algonquian" by Bloomfield consisting of a notebook (approx. 45 pages) and handwritten notes (approx. 80 pages); 5 folders of notebooks focusing on beginning sounds ("Č and K," "L and M," "N and P," " Š and T," and "Θ and ?"), drawing from Pacific Coast Algonquian ("PCA"), Fox [Meskwaki], Plains Cree, Menominee, and Ojibwe; 3 folders of other comparative Algonquian notebooks organized by general nouns, body parts, kinship terms, numerals, and verbs; miscellaneous Algonquian notes; and specimens of Central Algonquian, including short texts in Fox [Meskwaki], Ojibwe, Menominee, and Plains Cree, with English translations. The rest of the material in the Macro-Algonquian folder is organized according to specific languages: Blackfoot, Cheyenne, Fox (Meskwaki), Kutenai [Ktunaxa culture], Ojibwe, Penobscot, and Shawnee. Finally, there is an article titled "Some Observations on Algonquian Phonology" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries I: General works; an incomplete typed draft of Bloomfield's "Sketch of Algonquian" in Series IV. Works by Others; and a "Linguistic map of Southern New England" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries V: American Indian Languages.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Aztec
Language(s): English
Date: 1827-1897
Extent: 5 items
Description: Correspondence, an essay, and one image relating to Aztec materials at the American Philosophical Society. In the correspondence, Barabino writes that a "Mexican idol" intended for the APS has a broken face; Culin orders copies of "The Tribute Roll of Montezuma" by Brinton, Phillips, and Morris (Transactions, 1892) for J. F. Loubat; and Morris corresponds with Henry Phillips about the reproduction of the Montezuma tribute roll and Morris' work on the aforementioned article [Brinton, Phillips, and Morris (1892)]. Cushing's essay is based on the pictographic image: he identifies the APS's still image #443 as a copy of a codex in the Vatican, and superior to that printed in King (1831) in draftsmanship. The image itself is a black and white printed document, similar to that in King (1831), vol. 1, fac. 3, but (according to Cushing) better drawn and probably from a Vatican codex, although King's version is attributed to the Boturini Codex. See Boturini (1746):11 for details on manuscript.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1953, 1960-1961, 1972, 1976-1977, 1980-1981, 1984-1988, 1992-1999, 2012
Type:Text
Extent: 1123 pages
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 19 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Bender, Druke, Fogelson, Huff, Ishii, Jordan, Kilroe, Kosmider, Nichols, Phillips, Phillips, Pulte, Rachlin, Ruff, Scancarelli, Sheidley, Uchihara, and Witthoft. Some of these materials may be restricted due to cultural sensitvity or privacy considerations.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Comanche
Language(s): English
Date: July 20, 1846
Type:Text
Extent: 2 pages
Description: Letter to John L. Le Conte. Author has been to Washington studying Comanche and southwest Indian phonology, now has collected thirteen specimens of Indian languages, and made a talking machine that produces sounds. Also references Leidy and botany.
Collection: John L. (John Lawrence) LeConte papers (Mss.B.L493)

Denesuline
Alternate forms: Chipewyan, Dënesųłiné
Date: circa 1950
Type:Text
Extent: 2 folder
Description: Two items relating to the Denesuline language have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. One is in Subcollection I, Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-C: Other, and consists of notes in both English and French on the Dene alphabet and syllabary in a folder labeled "Inscribed Stone and Syllabary Material. The other is in Subcollection II, Series II. Research Notes, Subseries II. Na-Dene, and consists of a folder labeled "Athabascan (Chipewyan)." Its contents primarily concern Chipewyan, with briefer mentions of Apachean, Navajo, Hupa, Okanagan, Carrier, Chilcotin, Sekani, Beaver, and Tsuut'ina ("Sarcee"). It also includes correspondence with Harry Hoijer, 1950.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Language(s): English
Date: Undated
Type:Text
Extent: 2 pages
Description: Letter to John L. LeConte describing cave with Indian hieroglyphs and other comments on an exploring expedition [possibly the Sitgreaves Expedition (1851)].
Collection: John L. (John Lawrence) LeConte papers (Mss.B.L493)

Anishinaabe | Hawaiian | Potawatomi | Paiute | Cheyenne | Dakota | Arapaho | Kiowa
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1942-1968
Extent: circa 28
Description: There are many items relating to Indigenous American languages in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. This entry is intended as a catch-all for materials that cover Indigenous American languages in general and might not show up in narrower searches. Researchers should also view the entries for specific languages and regions. For this more general category, there is relevant material in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II. In Subcollection I, there are 7 folders relating to Voegelin's intended publication "American Indian Language" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries III-B: Works Authored by Voegelin [see also the associated material in Oversized]. Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-C: Other contains one file on inscribed stones and the Dene syllabary system and another on the Summer Linguistic Institute (in which many Native North American languages are mentioned). There are also two images of a stone inscribed with what were supposed to be Potawatomi petroglyphs in Series VII. Photographs. Also in Series VII are several language maps (i.e., "Indian language groups in the state of Illinois" and "American Indian Languages"), in which Algonquian languages are particularly well-represented. In Subcollection II, there is relevant correspondence with Wallace Chafe (regarding a census of speakers of indigenous languages), Kenneth Croft (regarding the state of American language work in Mexico, the use of mechanical recording equipment, Cheyenne materials, etc.), Samuel H. Elbert (regarding place names in Hawaii, comparison with Oceania and North America), Dell Hymes (regarding Anthropological Lingustics), Vernon E. Jake (regarding proposed language speaker census, particularly how to discern whether children really know the language), Luis S. Kemnitzer (a thank-you note in which Voegelin revealingly acknowledges, "Although I once worked with the Dakota language, I know little of its culture."), Jerome Kirk (a thank you known in which Voegelin asserts, "I've never found any speaker among the twenty American Indian languages I've worked with who got them [directional terms] straight."), and Morris Swadesh (many languages). Also in Subcollection II, there is a file of notes on classification of North American languages in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries XI. General; some "Ungrouped Tales," two folders with stories about Pechiha (Kickapoo?) and Yellow Horse (Arapaho?) attributed to Joe Pierce and Bruno Nettl, respectively, and a folder on sources in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries II. American Indian Tales for Children; and drafts, linguistic notes and maps in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries V. American Indian Languages.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Haudenosaunee | Cherokee | Catawba | Shawnee | Lenape | Wyandot | Miami | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: January 22, 1736; 1744-1774; November 3, 1768; March 14, 1792; 1794; March 10, 1796; August 28, 1817; October 7, 1892; November 11, 1913; November 20, 1913; 1952; 1953-1954; September 1954; Undated
Type:Text
Extent: 14 items
Description: Relavent materials can be found in the finding aid under the specific dates listed. A variety of materials relating to the Haudenosaunee. Eighteenth-century materials include James Logan's treaty instructions to Conrad Weiser in 1736/7; examples of symbols used in treaty signatures by chiefs; miscellaneous items relating to treaties, Indian raids, and land transfers in Virginia;a 1768 deed of land to William Trent; using the Six Nations to make peace with western tribes; Indian agents' accounts, and a journal of a survey of Moravian lands in the Erie triangle translated and edited by Paul A. W. Wallace. Nineteenth-century materials include correspondence regarding Iroquois language and an Iroquois census. Twentieth-century materials include lectures given by Wallace and Leland (on Benjamin Franklin, and on the Deerfield massacre and Eleazer Williams' claim to be the Lost Dauphin, respectively); correspondence between Newhouse and Parker about Newhouse's manuscript history of the "Five Nations Union," the Society of American Indians and possible creation of a Society of Canadian Indians; and Snyderman's essay on ethnohistory, particularly through materials at the American Philosophical Society, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the Quaker Historical Association, and the Haverford College Library. Other individuals mentioned include Shekallemy, Samuel Kirkland, Alfred, Street, Captain Brant, LIttle Billy, George Hoopaugh, Jacob Harmon, John Williams, Warham Williams, Madame de Pentigny, Captain John Stoddard, and John H. Hanson.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Winnebago
Language(s): English | Ho-Chunk
Date: 1938-1939
Type:Text
Extent: 281 pages, 11 notebooks
Description: The Ho-Chunk materials in the ACLS collection consists primarily of three items in the "Winnebago (Ho-Chunk)" section of the finding aid. The bulk of the material is Amelia Susman's 11 field notebooks, which contains texts with interlinear translation, Vocabularies, ethnographical and linguistic notes, and some songs. Two additional items also by Susman are extended analyses based upon field work with Sam Blowsnake and wife: "The accentual system of Winnebago" and "The Winnebago syllabary." In the "Chiwere (Iowa)" section of the finding aid, Gordon Marsh's "Materials for a study of the Iowa Indian language" include some Ho-Chunk grammatical notes, and Ho-Chunk cognates with Chiwere. Lastly, in the "Dakota" section, Franz Boas' "Miscellaneous Dakota notes" (item X8a.3) includes a Dakota-Ho-Chunk comparative word list.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Inuit | Yupik | Miwok | Maidu | Yokuts
Alternate forms: Eskimo, Unaaliq
Language(s): English | Greenlandic
Date: circa 1950-1973 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 4 folders
Description: Four items relating to Inuit (Eskimo) languages have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. They are all in Subcollection II. In Series I. Correspondence, there is correspondence wtih Richard L. Peterson about "Eskimo pictographic writing." In Series II. Research Notes, Subseries I. Eskimo-Aleutian, there are two folders labeled "Eskimo-Aleutian." Folder 1 includes information on Greenlandic, letters from Knut Bergsland (1950-1951), and "Presentation of 'A Grammar of the West Greenland Language' by Schultz-Lorensen," by Eeva Kangasmaa, 1952. Folder 2 includes brief information on Unaaliq [Yupik], Maidu, Miwok, and Yokuts, and the finished typescript of "Sketch of Eskimo." The third folder in the subseries, "Miscellaneous languages," contains Inuit material, among other languages.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)