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Atakapa | Biloxi | Catawba | Cherokee | Chitimacha | Choctaw | Chickasaw | Cocopah | Creek | Houma | Koasati | Lumbee | Natchez | Quapaw | Seminole | Shawnee | Timucua | Tunica | Tuscarora | Yuchi
Alternate forms: Cocopa, Coushatta
Language(s): English | Mobilian | Yuchi
Date: circa 1962-1983
Extent: 29 folders
Description: This entry is intended to encompass materials relating to James M. Crawford's interest in and study of Native North American languages. These items tend to be too general, too diffuse, or too vague in nature to easily fit under clear cultural or linguistic umbrellas. In Series III-D. Works by Crawford--Other, these items include "A Brief Account of the Indian Tribes of Northeast Georgia" (1962), a paper Crawford submitted in his Linguistics 170 class at Berkeley; Crawford's largely negative review of "Native Americans and Their Languages" by Roger Owen (1978); a typed copy of Crawford's "A Phonological Comparison of the Speech of Two Communities in California: East Bay and El Centro" (1964); typed drafts (with handwritten sections and penciled edits) of Crawford's "The Phonological Sequence ya in Words Pertaining to the Mouth in Southeastern and Other Indian Languages," which appeared in the volume “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages,” which he edited (1975); and three folders pertaining to Crawford's other work on the edited volume “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages,” including drafts, edits, notes, etc., of the preface and introduction Crawford wrote for the volume as well as exhaustive notes on bibliographic sources for several indigenous languages, including Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Natchez, Apalachee, Houma, Creek (Mukogean), Hitchiti, Seminole, Mobilian Jargon, Mikasuki, Alabama, Quapaw, Atakapa, Chitimacha, Timucua, Yuchi, Tuscarora, etc. (1970s). In Series IV-D. Research Notes & Notebooks—Other, items include a folder titled “Columbus Museum,” dated to July 1969, with research notes pertaining to Yuchi, Choctaw, Alabama-Koasati, Cherokee, etc., including the names and addresses of many potential language consultants for Yuchi, Shawnee, Catawba, Cherokee, etc., including some of the same people he visits in 1976 as described in “Mobilian Search—Notebook”; a folder labeled “Dialect Study (El Centro, East Bay),” with mostly handwritten notes and drafts pertaining to his "A Phonological Comparison of the Speech of Two Communities in California: East Bay and El Centro" (1964); “Haas Miscellany,” containing an Algonquian language chart attributed to Haas and two scraps of paper pertaining to her; “Miscellany,” containing notes on Maricopa, Digueno, Cocopa, Koasati, etc., as well as a plant specimen identified as Euphorbia chamaesyce; “Numerals from Indian Languages,” containing undated notes on numerals in Natchez, Muskogean, Hokan, Pomoan, Yukian, Wintun, Salinan, Esselen, Chumash, etc.; “Reconnaissance of Southeastern Indian Languages—Notebook,” a 1969 field notebook of a research trip mentioning numerous language consultants (Mrs. Rufus George, Yuchi and Cherokee, and Claude Medford, Creek?, prominent among them) and possible consultants, Choctaw, Seminole, Mikasuki, Cherokee, Lumbee, Creek, Chitimacha, Chickasaw, Shawnee, Yuchi, Tunica, Biloxi, Natchez, etc. people and languages, and commentary about relations between various groups, especially with Oklahoma groups [This item appears to be related to Crawford's research into the see also Mobilian materials]; “Mrs. Terrell—Notebook,” which contains a notebook of unidentified indigenous words elicited from consultants Mrs. Terrell and Mrs. Fletcher in April-May 1969; and “Unidentified,” containing sheets with a text in an unidentified indigenous language and its English translation. In Series VI. Course Material, there is a folder of materials relating to Crawford's coursework at Berkley, including “American Indian Languages--Linguistics 170 [1962]” as well as some Native North American material in an undated folder labeled “Seminars: 290a Theory; 290g American Indian Languages; Dialectology 216; 225; 130 Phonology—Notebook.” In Series II. Subject Files, there are materials relating to Crawford's research into to Mobilian, Cocopah, and Yuchi in “American Council of Learned Societies”; materials relating to his work in bilingual education under Title VII, particularly with the Yuchi in Oklahoma, in “Bilingual Education”; news clippings related to the work of Crawford and others in “Clippings”; records of payments to indigenous language consultants in “Informants' Receipts”; materials relating to Crawford's work with the Southeastern Indian Language Project via application materials in “National Science Foundation #1” and “National Science Foundation #2”; one folder of readers' reviews (pre-publication) and another folder of post-publication reviews of “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages”; and a grant proposal to do field work to study Yuchi in Sapulpa, Oklahoma in “University of Georgia—Grant Proposal,” in which Crawford outlines not only his proposed study but some historical information about Yuchi people and language. Finally, Series I. Correspondence contains many exchanges about Crawford's work on Native North American languages. Most of this correspondence revolves around Crawford's submission of papers and articles to academic conferences and publishers. The most interesting items include a letter from Ilona May (Thomas) Keyaite, the daughter of a Cocopah consultant; letters and notes about 1735 drawings of Yuchi and Creek Indians in Georgia in a folder labelled “Sturtevant, William C.” [1977-1978]. This series also includes various letters and notes from the University of Georgia recognizing Crawford's professional accomplishments and awards, and a few letters documenting the difficult publication history of the volume on Southeastern Indian Languages.
Collection: James M. Crawford Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.66)

Hupa
Alternate forms: Na:tini-xwe
Language(s): Hupa | English
Date: undated, 2001-2004
Extent: 0.1 linear feet
Description: In addition to copies of several small publications on Hupa history, stories and songs (Series 2), Bright possessed a sketch map of Shastan languages distributed throughout California (Series 5), and corresponded with several researchers, most significantly Juliette Blevins, in which there is a lexicon of plants and animals (Series 1).
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Karuk
Alternate forms: Karuk
Language(s): English | Karuk
Date: 1976 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 2 folders
Description: Two items relating to the Karuk (Karuk) language have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. Both are in Subcollection II. They consist of correspondence with Samuel H. Elbert in Series I. Correspondence; and Karuk examples in a comparative vocabulary of California tribes (with words from from Hupa, Wiyot, Karuk, Shasta, Achumawi, Atsugewi, Konkow, Yana, Wintu, Maidu, and Modoc) in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries V. Hokan.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Karuk
Alternate forms: Karok
Language(s): Karuk | English | Spanish
Date: 1949-2006
Extent: 4 linear feet
Description: From the age of 21 throughout his life, William Bright worked with Karuk speakers to document and revitalize their language, resulting in becoming the first white honorary member of the Karuk tribe. The most prominent materials at the American Philosophical Society as a result are wide-ranging audio recordings, from the 1950s until the 2000s (Series 6), especially with Violet Super. With Susan Gehr, he produced a Karuk language dictionary, correspondence with whom (Series 1) contains draft texts. With the Karuk he contributed considerably to the literature on Coyote in particular, original transcriptions of which are in notebooks in Series 3 Subseries 1, and further developments in Series 2. He also collected many small publications about Karuk, in the same series. Additionally of interest in Series 1 is correspondence about the suspected arson of a'tim'îin, the Karuk sacred site near Somes Bar, CA. Karuk materials can be found in every series.
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Luiseño
Alternate forms: Payómkawichum
Language(s): English
Date: 1993-1996
Type:Text
Extent: 440 pages
Description: The Luiseño materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 2 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Thorne and Weiner.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Paiute
Date: 1976, 19797, 1981, 1986-1990, 2012-2013
Type:Text
Extent: 1407 pages, 10 CDs
Description: The Paiute materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 6 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Bunte, Knack, Ramsay, Thornes, and Toosarvandani.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Pomo
Date: circa 1907-1934
Type:Text
Extent: unclear
Description: The Pomo materials in the Franz Boas Papers are of unclear total extent, though a few letters relating to Pomo languages and peoples have been identified. In the correspondence with Jaime de Angulo, see especially the letter sent by de Angulo to Boas on December 5, 1934, which details Pomo kinship terms in "Clear Lake" and "Yukaya" Pomo. Other letters in the de Angulo-Boas correspondence may contains other discussion of Pomo languages. In the correspondence with Alfred Kroeber, mentions of Pomo can be found in letters from Kroeber to Boas on December 17, 1907, and May 4, 1927, as well as letter from Boas to Kroeber on May 3, 1930. The collection may contain additional letters and correspondences of relevance beyond these that have not yet been identified. 
Collection: Franz Boas Papers (Mss.B.B61)

Pomo
Language(s): English | Pomo, Northern
Date: 1986, 2001-2003, 2009
Type:Text
Extent: 370 pages
Description: The Pomo materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 2 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Bauer and O'Connor.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Maidu | Konkow | Wailaki | Nomlaki
Alternate forms: Concow, Noamlakee, Nomelaki
Date: 1930s-1970s
Extent: 1.5 linear feet
Description: During the late 1930s, Amelia Susman Schultz conducted fieldwork on acculturation at the Round Valley Indian Reservation, California, for a Ph.D. thesis eventually published in 1976. Series II of the Amelia Susman Schultz Papers reflects both periods of research, though mostly the late 1930s. Of particular interest are: ten field notebooks from 1937, most containing some language data (undetermined as yet which languages) in addition to ethnographic notes from discussions with consultants; ethnographic notes arranged by subject (see items titled "Ethnographic notes by subject" in addition to "Notes on full sheets" and "Notes on half sheets"); descriptions of Round Valley's chronology, population history, genealogy, and socioeconomic surveys; and Schultz's works-in-progress, including the original dissertation.
Collection: Amelia Susman Schultz Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.171)

Achumawi | Atsugewi | Maidu | Pomo | Wailaki | Yuki
Alternate forms: Pit River
Language(s): English
Date: 2002-2003, 2009
Contributor: Bauer, William
Type:Text
Extent: 347 pages
Description: The Round Valley materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 1 item. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Bauer.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)