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Ditidaht
Date: ca.1931-1972
Subject: Linguistics | Music
Extent: 1.5 linear feet
Description: The most noteworthy aspect of Mary Haas' Ditidaht file, stemming from fieldwork conducted with Morris Swadesh as her first fieldtrip, is a fairly detailed transcription of songs collected. Series 2 contains the transcriptions and Series 10 the cassette copies, while the original tapes are housed at the Indiana University Archives of Traditional Music. There is much overlap with Nuu-chah-nulth, as Haas frequently identified correspondences between them. A sizeable lexical file (Series 9) and correspondence with many, especially Edward Sapir and George Herzog (Series 1) may also be of interest.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Hupa
Alternate forms: Na:tini-xwe
Language(s): Hupa | English
Date: 1950-1962
Extent: 0.75 linear feet
Description: Haas' Hupa file is mostly comprised of published and unpublished work by others, most notably Mary Woodward and Edward Sapir. Series 1 includes correspondence with both Mary Woodward and Victor Golla on Hupa fieldwork and research. Chimariko and Hupa card files in Series 9 include lexica, phonological analysis and ethnographic notes, and are derived from work by Sapir and Woodward, including transcriptions by Woodward herself. Haas' Yurok field notebook in Series 2 includes a 12-page Hupa section with consultants Ned Jackson and Sam Brown, consisting of a basic lexicon and some grammatical paradigms. There are also some additional morphological and phonological analyses in the same series with notes from an unidentified author (possibly Woodward), and Haas made use of Hupa as an exercise in phonological reconstruction. Copies of materials housed at the Berkeley Language Center are also present in Series 10, and have been digitized, available at the APS Digital Library.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

A'wa'etłala | K'ómoks | Da'naxda'xw | Dzawada'enuxw | Gopinuxw | Gusgimukw | Gwa'sala | Gwatsinuxw | Gwawa'enuxw | Kwakwaka'wakw | Kwagu'ł | Kwikwasutinuxw | Ławitsis | Ma'a̱mtagila | Mamalilikala | Nak'waxda'xw | Namgis | Tłatłasikwala | Wiwekam | Wiweqayi
Alternate forms: Gwasilla, Gwawaenuk, K'omoks, Koskimo, Kwakiutl, Kwicksutaineuk, Laich-kwil-tach, Lekwiltok, Nakoaktok, Nakwoktak, Nimpkish, Quatsino, Tanakteuk, Tlowitsis, Tsawataineuk, Weiwaikai, Weiwaikum
Language(s): English | German | Kwak'wala
Date: 1893-1951
Extent: Approx. 10,000 loose pages, 10 notebooks, 7000+ cards, 10+ maps
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw materials in the ACLS collection are located predominantly in the "Kwakiutl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing of all materials. Some of the larger individaul sets of materials listed within this section also have their own specific tables of contents (available upon request) detailing their often highly diverse contents. Overall, the vast majority of the material is made of of 1) manuscripts sent to Boas by George Hunt from the 1890s to the 1930s, frequently in both Kwak'wala and English, covering a very broad range of Kwakwaka'wakw history, culture, languages, customs, and traditions; and 2) field work materials recorded by Boas and Boas' own analyses of material sent by Hunt, covering a similar range of topics. Additional materials by other individuals focus especially on linguistic and ethnographic matters. Also see the "Kwakiutl materials, Franz Boas Papers," for information on the correspondence between Boas and Hunt, which gives additional context to the materials in the ACLS collection.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Muscogee | Seminole | Yuchi
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): English | Muscogee | Yuchi
Date: 1904-1947
Extent: 14 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Creek history, language, and culture. Includes Speck's own notes and work, including "Notes on Social and Economic Conditions Among the Creek Indians of Alabama in 1941" (published as Speck 1947); an undated earlier version of that essay titled "Creek Indians Surviving in Alabama"; 115 pages of linguistic notes from Taskigitown, dated 1904-1905 and organized by categories; Creek and Yuchi songs; Creek and Yuchi Dance; 98 pages of Creek texts, including some interlineal translations, and related notes dated 1904-1905; and 35 pages of miscellaneous notes and letters on topics like dances, language, clothing, myths, handicrafts, and fieldwork. Also includes two botanical specimens--Coopti (Zamia floridana) used by Seminoles, 1941 and Ilex vomitoria Ait, used by Creeks--accompanied by letters to Speck from Richard Evans Schultes concerning Houma Botany; two letters from female students at the Haskell Institute in 1940 (Leona Giger writes of a Creek doll she is making and mentions the council house at Okmulgee, Oklahoma, while Ann Rolland offers to answer questions on Creek use of feathers); a letter from Morris Opler regarding Opler's work among the Creeks, as well as an essay by Opler about the organization, history, and social and political significance of Creek towns; a letter from Mario Gamio acknowledging the receipt of a Creek Indian pamphlet; and a letter from D'Arcy McNickle returning to Speck photographs of the Creek Indians of Atmore, Alabama to prevent them from getting lost and mentioning that his manuscript of the report is still being copied.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Nlaka'pamux
Alternate forms: Thompson
Language(s): English | Nlaka'pamuctsin
Date: 1885, 1898-1918
Extent: 1000+ loose pages, 500+ slips, 23 notebooks, 1 map
Description: The Nlaka'pamux materials in the ACLS collection are located primarily in the "Thompson" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing. They consist predominantly of ethnographic, historical, linguistic, and botanical materials recorded and assembled by James Teit from the 1890s to the 1910s and sent to Boas. Many of the material listed in the finding aid, especially those of larger size, are composed of many shorter, distinct individual manuscripts on specific topics that were gathered together into the large sets of manuscripts and assigned general titles such as "Thompson materials" or "Salish ethnographic materials." Many additional Nlaka'pamux materials can also be found in the "Salish" section of the finding aid, often intermixed among information on neighboring Interior Salish peoples. In both of these sections there are also some additional materials, generally linguistic, by Franz Boas and others.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Tohono O'odham | Tepecano | Tepehuán | Akimel O'odham
Alternate forms: Papago, Pima
Language(s): English | Spanish | Tohono O'odham
Date: 1918-1955
Type:Text
Extent: 19 items
Description: Materials relating to John Alden Mason's interest in and research on Tohono O'odham language and culture, and particularly of his preparation of "The Language of the Papago of Arizona" (1950), informally referred to as his Papago grammar. Of particular interest will be materials by Juan Dolores, a Tohono O'odham man who both published his own work on Tohono O'odham (then called Papago) language and culture and also worked as a consultant for Mason, Alfred Kroeber, and others. Dolores items in this collection include three notebooks (numbered 10, 11, and 12, each with a table of contents) on Papago [Tohono O'odham] grammar apparently in the hand of Dolores with some additional notes by Mason; a table of contents listing myths and songs in notebook #14, which is missing; 138 pages of Papago [Tohono O'odham] texts with interlinear English and two copies of "The Sacred Case" myth in Northern Tepehuan with English translation. There is also a Papago [Tohono O'odham] text (in ink) without translation, attributed to Miguel Garcia, with corrections by Juan Dolores (in pencil). This collection also contains many of Mason's field notes and writings on Tohono O'odham, including a notebook of field notes on kinship terms, vocabulary, texts, comparisons with Tepecano, etc.; a notebook of songs with English interlinear translations, ethnographic and archaeological notes, Tepecano and Papago [Tohono O'odham] comparisons, etc.; two boxes comprising a linguistics card file of Papago [Tohono O'odham] words with English glosses, along with grammatical or other explanatory notes; miscellaneous notes on kinship terms, paradigms, and various other grammatical matters; a four-page summary of the general characteristics of Tohono O'odham without examples; drafts of an article by Mason giving Dolores' verb conjugations and a letter of George Herzog's comments on same, along with various notes, lists, analyses, etc., on Papago [Tohono O'odham] adjectives, nouns, verbs, pronouns, etc., much of it from Dolores; notes on Papago nominal stems ending in l, li, or ta based on list of stems from Dolores, with cognates from Pima, Northern Tepehuan, and Tepecano; four pages on Papago words with p and t, with English glosses; Tohono O'odham texts with interlinear translations in English and occasionally Spanish; and Mason's comments on William Kurath's "A brief introduction to Papago." Correspondents include George Herzog, who sent several pages of comments on Mason's Papago [Tohono O'odham] grammar; Alfred Kroeber regarding Mason's Papago [Tohono O'odham] grammar; Ruth Underhill regarding their shared interests in Papago [Tohono O'odham] culture and and Joe Grimes, Burton W. Bascom, Jr., George Herzog, Rev. Fr. Regis Rohder, O. F. M., and Dean Saxton regarding Mason's Papago [Tohono O'odham] grammar and the dispute with Morris Swadesh on whether there is one or two stop series in Papago [Tohono O'odham].
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Tsimshian | Gitxsan | Nisga'a | Haisla | Tahltan
Alternate forms: Ts'msyan, Ts'msyen, Zimshian, Gitksan, Niska, Nisgah, Nisgha, Nishga, Nass
Language(s): English | German | Tsimshian
Date: 1893-1895, 1906-1909, 1915, 1920-1940, 1974
Type:Text
Extent: Approx. 1,000 slips 5 notebooks, 1500+ loose pages
Description: The Tsimshian materials in the ACLS collection consist of numerous items concentrated in the "Tsimshian" section of the finding aid. Noteworthy materials include texts, vocabularies, and notes on music recorded by Boas in the 1890s, along with an English-Tsimshian dictionary file. There is a large body of material recorded by William Beynon, including Vocabularies, notes on kinship, and a large body of stories (primarily in English) pertaining to primarily to Tsimshian history. (A full table of contents of these texts is available.) Also of note are Henry Tate's are texts sent to Boas by Henry Tate with interlinear texts, Vocabularies, and grammatical analyses by Amelia Susman from the late 1930s; an extensive lexicon file by an unidentified compiler (may be Susman); and essays on social organization and linguistics by Barbeau and Beynon. A set of cards, long identified as "Kwakiutl social organization," have been identified as "Tsimshian names file" now at the end of the Tsimshian section. This was likely compiled by William Beynon, and contains a few Gitxsan, Nisga'a, and Haisla ("Kitimat") names, and some with notes on kinship of "Tahltan Stickine origin." Some additional materials comparing Tsimshian and Nisga'a can be found in the "Nass" section of the finding aid.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Tunica | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Alabama | Koasati | Natchez | Atakapa | Chitimacha | Avoyelles
Alternate forms: Coushatta, Avoyel
Date: ca.1933-1960s
Extent: 3 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas conducted extensive fieldwork on Tunica with last speaker Sesostrie Youchigant, subsequently publishing a grammar as her PhD dissertation, and later texts and a dictionary. Fourteen field notebooks can be found in the dedicated subseries in Series 2, along with abundant grammatical and lexical notes and sheet music. Tunica was an integral part of Haas' comparative work on the Gulf hypothesis, so extensive comparisons can be found, especially in the lexical slip files of Series 9. Haas' Tunica work also contains more ethnographic notes than most of her files. Photographs of Sesostrie Youchigant are present in Series 11 and can be viewed at the Digital Library.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Tutelo | Lenape | Cayuga | Onondaga
Language(s): English
Date: 1931-1942
Type:Text
Extent: 5 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's interest in Tutelo language, history, and culture. These include three letters from Canadian (Grand River, Ontario) Delaware Samuel John concerning John's Tutelo background and Speck's visit to Canadian Delawares; Speck's field notes from Grand River, Ontario on recordings of Tutelo and Onondaga songs and noting the order of rites [see also Speck (1942)]; Speck's Tutelo field notes from Ohsweken including a notebook of 53 pages of ceremonials, an account of Tutelo ceremonial procedure, a note on the Cayuga burial and redressing ceremony, and letters from indigenous consultants George Nash and Mrs. John Ruck concerning museum specimens; 12 pages of miscellaneous notes and correspondence, including a 1-page list of Tutelo names, 2 pages on Longhouse religious ceremonies, 1 note card and 4 pages of reading notes on adoption rites, two letters from John R. Swanton to Speck citing Byrd's History of the Dividing Line for Sappony-Tutelo references and concerning Tutelo linguistic forms and relationships, a letter from William N. Fenton to Speck concerning Tutelo songs and difficulties of attending Seneca longhouse ceremonies, and a letter from H. W. Dorsey (Smithsonian Institution) transmitting a photo of a Tutelo adoption necklace; and an 11-page draft of an essay on Tutulo ceremonies focusing on the adoption rite. (NOTE: portions of these materials pertaining to Tutelo ceremonies may be restricted due to potential cultural sensitivity.)
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Wintu | Klamath | Takelma | Maya | Patwin | Miwok
Date: 1888-1953
Description: The Wintu materials in the Harvey Pitkin Papers are extensive. Subcollection I, Series I, contains notes, notebooks, vocabularies, slip files, texts, manuscripts and phonetic tracings by Jeremiah Curtin in the late 19th century, Roland Dixon, and A.M. Halpern. Series I-B contains Pitkin's grammar slip files and vocabularies collected by Curtin. Series I-C includes Jaime de Angulo's manuscript on the Patwin lagnague, S.A. Barrett's transcritptions and translations of speech and song recordings, Radin's "Grammatical Sketch" and Waterman's notes on Patwin phonetics. Series II-A is rich in materials collected by A.L. Krober. In Subcollection II, Pitkin's field notes are located in Series 2, Subseries 1. Subseries 2 includes Pitkin's extensive notes on his Wintu dictionary, grammar, texts, stories, and music. The manuscript of the dictionary is located in Subseries 3. There is an unpublished 416 page manuscript of stories written in both English and Wintu, songs, and transcriptions in Subseries 4. This section also includes copies of all the extant linguistic material with works by noted linguists such as Curtin, Albert Gatschet, Radin, Halpern, Morris Swadesh, Victor Golla, and J.P. Harrington. Series 6 is comprised of card file slips with comparative analyses by Pitkin of the four languages of the Wintun family.
Collection: Harvey Pitkin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.78)