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Innu | Naskapi | Atikamekw | Wabanaki | Lenape | Algonquin | Mashpee | Passamaquoddy | Wampanoag | Mi'kmaq | Penobscot | Maliseet | Muscogee | Menominee
Alternate forms: Menomini, Têtes-de-Boules, Têtes de Boules, Tete de Boule
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1920-1940
Description: The materials from Algonquian speaking cultures is quite extensive, though scattered, in the A. Irving Hallowell Papers. One of the strengths is Hallowell's very fine black and white portraits of indigenous peoples located in Series VI, Subseries F, which includes images of Mashpee, Mohegan, Montagnais, Naskapi, Womponowag, Nipissing, Atikamekw, Series V contains some generalized materials such "Algoquian Cross Cousin Marriage," Speck's studies of northern Algoquian hunting territories, and Algonquin mythology and history. The folders entitled "Eastern Woodlands" in box 26 contain more culturally specific materials such as a Penobscot vocabulary list, Innu and Naswkapi material culture, and Delaware religions and ceremonies, although many of these are quite brief. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a letter from John Swanton discussing bear ceremonialism in Muscogee culture. George Herzog's correspondence includes Penobscot and Maliseet scores of war dance songs. There is also a letter from Jeffrey Zelitch, dated 1969, describing traditional ceremonies on the Lakota Rosebud reservation just before the American Indian Movement begins. George Spindler's lettter to describes a Medicine Lodge ceremony among the Menomini.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Hupa | Wiyot | Karuk | Shasta | Achumawi | Atsugewi | Yana | Wintu | Maidu | Modoc | Tübatulabal | Yokuts
Alternate forms: Karok, Na:tini-xwe
Date: 1949-1952 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 5 folders
Description: Several items relating to the indigenous peoples and languages of the region now known as California have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. This entry is intended as a catch-all for items Voegelin himself grouped under the general heading of "California." Researchers should also view the entries for specific culture groups and languages. The various subseries devoted to Hokan, Penutian, and Uto-Aztecan languages in Subcollection II, Series II. Research Notes might also be of interest. The following "California" items are all located in Subcollection II. They include a comparative vocabulary of California tribes (with words from from Hupa, Wiyot, Karuk, Shasta, Achumawi, Atsugewi, Konkow [Northwest Maidu], Yana, Wintu, Maidu, and Modoc) in Subcollection II, Series II. Research Notes, Subseries V. Hokan. There are two items in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries IX. Uto-Aztecan, except Hopi: a folder on "Baja California" containing notes excerpting "Tribes and Languages of Baja California" by William C. Massey, vol 5, pp. 272-307 (1949), and a folder containing comparative charts of . There are two stories--"Coyote and the Women Hunters" (Tübatulabal) and "Measuring Worm Rescues Two Boys" (Yokuts)--in the California Indian Tales category in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries II: American Indian Tales for Children. Finally, there is a copy of Giuseppe Francescato's masters thesis "A Structural Comparison of the Californian Penutian" (1952) in Series IV. Works by Others.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Saulteaux
Date: 1932-1949
Description: The Ojibwe materials in the A. Irving Hallowell Papers are extensive. Hallowell focused on three regions of Ojibwe territory: Berens River in north, central Canada (Pikangikum, Pauingassi, Poplar River; Little Grand Rapids First Nations) and Lac du Flambeau in Wisconsin. Hallowell was particularly interested in psychological anthropology. Both the Berens River and Lac du Flambeau materials in Series V, for example, includes ethnographic information on taboos, incest regulations, Rorschach tests, dreams, and acculturation. Hallowell's interests in traditional knowledge are represented by descriptions of the practice of the Midewiwin religion; traditional stories about Wisakedjak and Tcakabec/Chakabesh, Memegwesiug, Windigos, and Thunderbirds. Of particular interest in the Lac du Flambeau materials are hundred of pages of family biographies in Series V and photographs with the names of community members in Series VI, Subseries B. Of particular interest in the Berens River materials are maps of traditional hunting grounds, a diagram of Ojibwe cosmology, an autobiography by Hallowell's collaborator Chief William Berens, 29 folders of "Saulteaux Indians--Myths and Tales" all in Series V. There are hundreds of photographs from the region, with many community members identified, and all digitized, in Series VI, Subseries A. The correspondence, in Series I, includes Robert Ritzenhaler's description of a shaking tent ceremony by Ojibwe in Wisconsin; a detailed account of Joseph Fiddler's trial for murdering a windigo in the folder labled Royal Canadian Mounted Police; papers sent by Morton Teicher detailing incidents of windigo in Canada (50+ pages); a letter from Frances Densmore describing a shaking tent ceremony; and several letters from Chief William Berens providing information about Ojibwe people in the photographs in Series VI.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Abenaki | Mi'kmaq | Penobscot
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1669; 1678; 1725-1796; 1809-1884; 1900-1995
Extent: 12 linear feet; 3 hrs. (audio)
Description: The Penobscot materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are concentrated in Series III. Siebert collected census material, treaties and treaty minutes, placenames, with a strong representation of songs, stories, and linguistic materials. There are detailed notes about Indian claims in Maine and genealogical information. There are also educational materials for the teaching of the Penobscot language as well as a wealth of information on Penobscot linguistics. Series V, Siebert's notebooks, have extensive grammatical, phonetic, and vocabulary of the Penobscot language. Both Series III and V reflect Siebert's deep interest in the history of Maine and the Eastern Abenaki including archaeological, pre-history, and colonial era documents such as the Eliot Bible, which Siebert owned a rare copy in his library, which was sold at auction. Series VI and VII contain various drafts of essays on Penobscot culture, language, and history. Series XII contains approximately 3 hours of Penobscot language recordings, primarily from the 1930s and 1950s.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)