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Naskapi | Yurok
Language(s): English
Date: 1918-1945 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 10 items
Description: A variety of materials relating to Speck's study of diverse Algonquian peoples, cultures, and languages. Includes his "Remnants of the Eastern Indian Tribes," a brief discussion of location of New England Algonquians; his favorable review of John M. Cooper, "Snares, Deadfalls, and other Traps of Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapascans" [Printed, Speck (1939).]; a "Table of Double Curve Motif," charting techniques and variations of motifs of various Northwestern, Iroquoian, and central Algonquian peoples; a manuscript draft and additions of "Terms of relationship and the family territorial band among the Northeastern Algonquins," [Printed, Speck (1918).]; letters from Alanson Skinner challenging Speck's ethnic position of the Southeastern Algonquian on meaning of Eskimo-type artifacts found in Algonquian site in New York (State); materials from Eva L. Butler, including two pamphlets containing transcriptions of historical letters, principally from the Connecticut State Library--"Colonial Letters of our Ancestors" and "Letters of the Indians"--and "Botany and ethnozoology of the New England Indians," a bibliography of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century sources for ethnobotantical and ethnozoological references; letters from Edward Sapir concerning Speck (1918a), particularly Yurok comparisons, his excitement about reduction of language stocks, and possible typographical errors; and letters from Carl F. Voegelen concerning the usefulness of Speck's Naskapi material for comparative study of Algonquian languages and seeking an article on process by which Algonquian languages become extinct.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Catawba | Cherokee | Tutelo
Language(s): English | Catawba | Tutelo
Date: 1716; 1803; 1951-1997
Extent: 7 boxes
Description: The Catawba materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are primarily concentrated in Series II. These consist of copies of secondary sources such as an "Indian Vocabulary from Fort Christanna, 1716, Catawba census notes, 1830-1929, land claim agreements, and a dictionary of Place names in South Carolina. Original materials include hundreds of pages of Siebert's FIeld notes and a Catawba vocabulary / dictionary done with Wes Taukchiray.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Maya
Language(s): English | Spanish
Date: 1926-1959
Extent: Circa 455 leaves; circa 635 pages; photographs
Description: The Central America materials, John Alden Mason Papers include correspondence regarding linguistic, archaeological, and ethnological work in Mexico and Guatemala; meetings; etc. Regarding archaeological work in Guatemala, Mexico, and Panama. Regarding Piedras Negras, Guatemala; Chichen Itza; archaeological work in Guatemala and Mexico. Regarding archaeological work in Guatemala, Mexico, and Texas. Regarding Pima; Yaqui; Piedras Negras, Guatemala; Maya glyphs and architecture; archaeological work in Guatemala, Mexico, and British Honduras. The bulk of the material is from 1933-1939 and concerns archaeological work at Piedras Negras, Guatemala. Some discussion of the Mayan calendar, the ruins at Yaxchilan, Mexico, and a 1953 expedition to the Caracol Ruins, Honduras. Scholarly materials: Article for [Lilly de Jongh] Osborne's handbook of Guatemala regarding the ruins of Piedras Negras, Guatemala. A paper entitled, "Los cuatro grandes filones linguisticos de Mexico y Centroamerica" for the International Congress of Americanists, Mexico, August 1939. A paper read at meeting of the American Anthropological Association, December 1938, on the genetic classification of Middle American languages. Bibliographies of books and a few manuscripts on Indians of Central America, Mexico, and South America; letter from Zelig Harris to Mason; Mason's reply. Paper sent to Mason to be read at the meeting of the American Anthropological Association. Discusses Hokan-Siouan Phylum, Tarascan, Macro-Otomanguean Phylum, Macro-Penutian Phylum, and Macro-Chibchan Phylum. Notes on genetic relationships and geographic distribution. Mostly from published sources. A compilation and juxtaposition of various opinions. A talk given before Sociedad de geografia e historia de Guatemala regarding the architecture of Piedras Negras. English original which was translated into Spanish for publication in Anales 15 (December 1938): pages 202-216. A paper "Middle American Linguistics, 1955" by Norman A. McQuown; draft of a paper by Mason discussing that of McQuown; a copy of Mason's paper as delivered at the meeting of the American Anthropological Association, November 17, 1955, Boston; a copy of Mason's paper as corrected for correspondence with Robert J. Weitlaner and Gordon R. Willey.
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Kiowa | Ponca | Shawnee | Cheyenne | Menominee | Ho-Chunk
Language(s): English
Date: 1885; 1936-1981
Description: The General Linguistics material in the Lounsbury collection can be found in Series II. It includes a broad array works ranging from archeoastronomy to maps to lectures presented by Lounsbury on the history of linguistics. Many of the items are secondary sources.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Abenaki | Mi'kmaq | Penobscot
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1669; 1678; 1725-1796; 1809-1884; 1900-1995
Extent: 12 linear feet; 3 hrs. (audio); 5 photographs
Description: The Penobscot materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are concentrated in Series III. Siebert collected census material, treaties and treaty minutes, placenames, with a strong representation of songs, stories, and linguistic materials. There are detailed notes about Indian claims in Maine and genealogical information. There are also educational materials for the teaching of the Penobscot language as well as a wealth of information on Penobscot linguistics. Series V, Siebert's notebooks, have extensive grammatical, phonetic, and vocabulary of the Penobscot language. Both Series III and V reflect Siebert's deep interest in the history of Maine and the Eastern Abenaki including archaeological, pre-history, and colonial era documents such as the Eliot Bible, which Siebert owned a rare copy in his library, which was sold at auction. Series VI and VII contain various drafts of essays on Penobscot culture, language, and history. Series XI contains 5 related photos of Louis Lolar, taken in 1933. Series XII contains approximately 3 hours of Penobscot language recordings, primarily from the 1930s and 1950s.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Tupi | Rama | Quechua | Guarani | Cocama | Kogi | Chibcha | Guna | Aymara | Kawahiva | Ese Ejja | Yanesha' | Inca
Alternate forms: Kuna
Date: 1937-1960 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 23 items
Description: Materials relating to John Alden Mason's interest in and research on indigenous South American languages and cultures. Materials attributed to Mason include a bibliography composed of about 300 cards primarily on South American languages, including many entries not in the Handbook of South American Indians; a notebook of observations on the distribution, relationships, etc., of South American languages; a file with correspondence, bibliography, draft of introduction, etc., relating to his contribution to the Handbook of South American Indians; a 166-page essay on the preconquest history and culture of the Andean region (mostly Peru) through the medium of artifacts preserved in the University Museum (University of Pennsylvania); two copies of Mason's "Andean Civilization," including bibliography, for the Encyclopedia Britannica (1960); two copies of the preface to the Spanish edition of "Ancient Civilizations of Peru," with a memorandum from Alfred Kidder II to Mason regarding recent developments in Central Andean archaeology; an incomplete essay titled "Status and problems of research in the Native Languages of South America," primarily concerned with historical linguistics and genetic relationship; and a file of notes on genetic relationships, subgrouping, etc., from published sources or giving his own impressions: Kamakan, Choroti, Ashluslay Kaduveo, Mataco; Malali, Mashakal, Ge, Vejoz, Coropo, Motilon, Towothl, Kaingang, Subtiaba, Hokan, Coroado, etc.. Unattributed materials (most likely Mason's) include circa 2,000 cards of notes on South American linguistic and ethnology focused on genetic classification of South American languages; circa 4,000 cards of notes regarding South American languages and dialects and their geographical distribution, etc.; and 17 pages of notes concerning a letter (included) from Harry B. Wright to Captain Colon Eloy Alfaro proposing that expeditions be sent to Ecuadorean Oriente for study in linguistics, ethnology, etc. Materials attributed to others than Mason include two essays or drafts by John Peabody Harrington on the affiliation of Witoto [Huitoto, probably Murui Huitoto but possibly Nüpode Huitoto], Miranya [aka Miraña or Miranha, now known as Bora] and Guaranian/Tupi-Guarani [Guarani, represented by Cocama], one with Mason's comments; 27 pages of Kagaba [Kogi] texts with interlinear Spanish translation and lists of animals, plants, body parts, natural phenomena, kinship terms, etc., with Spanish and English glosses; and Eugenio Garro's "Geographical distribution of the Native languages and dialects of Peru," an article submitted for the Handbook of South American Indians (marked "not printed in Handbook"). Correspondence includes Mason's Handbook of South American Indians correspondence, with Zellig S. Harris, Harry Hoijer, Eugene A. Nida, et al., soliciting contributions to the handbook, etc.; letters from Claude Levi-Strauss regarding locations, languages, and dialects of indigenous peoples of Brazil (mentions Parintintin [Kagwahiva], Rama-Rama [Rama], Tupi, Nambikuara [Southern Nambikuára], Tupi-Kawahib [Kawahiva?], Kabixiana [Kabixí], Kep-kiri-uat [?]); correspondence with John Peabody Harrington concerning Harrington's work for Mason on the Handbook of South American Indians; correspondence with Willard Z. Park regarding Park's ethnological work among the Kagaba [Kogi] in Colombia; correspondence with Louis Rankin regarding the Cocama, Cocamilla [the dialects of what is now called Cocama-Cocamilla], Chama [Ese Ejja], Campa [Ajyíninka Apurucayali?], and Amuesha [Yanesha'] languages of Peru; correspondence with David B. Stout regarding Stout's genetic classification of Chibchan, Kuna, and Choco, with one page of Mason's opinions on Stout's classification; correspondence with John Howland Rowe regarding South American languages and cultures, including the Quechua, Aymara, and Millcayac languages, early work of Max Uhle in Peru, Bolivia, etc.. and mentioning Alfred V. Kidder, Alfred L. Kroeber, and others; and a letter from Otis H. Green regarding the origin of the word "jivaro."
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Narragansett | Wampanoag
Alternate forms: Nauset, Mashpee
Language(s): English
Date: 1923-1928 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 2 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of the peoples now often known collectively as Wampanoag, but who once comprised several tribal entities living in eastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island, including Cape Cod (the Nauset) and islands such as Martha's Vineyard (the Aquinnah or Gay Head Indians). In Subcollection I, Series I, see item II(4B9c), "Mistassini Band -- c. Field Notes," which contains notes, some by Gladys Tantaquidgeon concerning "Gay Head Indians." In this same series, see item III(14D11) "Wampanoag miscellaneous notes," which includes one postal card from Uncle Al to Speck, concerning an island; a letter from Rachelle T. Ryan to Speck reserving a cottage at Gay Head; Frederick S. Hammett (Wistar Institute) to Speck concerning his archaeological find at North Truro, Massachusetts; and a four-page letter from Chief Leroy C. Perry (Ousamequin or Yellow Feather, Wampanoag) concerning tribal and intertribal social activities. Item III(14D17), "Pennacook miscellaneous notes" contains a notebook with information on Wampanoag of Martha's Vineyard and Cape Cod areas, incuding genealogical and population notes. In Series I, Series II, see correspondence with Marion G. Bever. Finally, see the "Wampanoag" folder in Subcollection I, Series III, which contains 6 photographs. In Subcollection I, Series IV, there is one lantern slide of Mashpee Indians. In Series V, see the map "Maine, New England, Eastern Canada."
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Yupik | Cup'ik | Deg Xit'an | Koyukon
Alternate forms: Cupik, Eskimo, Yup'ik, Deg Hit'an, Deg Hitan, Degexit'an, Kaiyuhkhotana, Ingalik (pej.)
Date: 1978-1981, 1990, 1995-1996
Type:Text
Extent: 911 pages
Description: The Yupik materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 5 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Griffin (Dennis and Eve), Jolles, and Woodbury.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)