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Navajo | Yuchi | Cherokee | Creek | Choctaw | Penobscot | Innu | Naskapi | Maliseet | Tunica | Chitimacha | Catawba | Inuit | Tsimshian | Seneca | Cayuga | Haudenosaunee | Cheyenne | Maya | Pueblo | Nanticoke | Catawba | Mi'kmaq | Quechua | Dakota | Chinook | Kwakwaka'wakw | Klamath | Pamunkey | Chickahominy | Rappahannock
Alternate forms: Montagnais-Naskapi, Eskimo, Iroquois, Malecite, Micmac, Sioux, Kwakiutl
Language(s): English | German
Date: 1904-1950
Type:Text
Extent: 46 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's research and other professional activities. Items include Speck's notes taken during graduate work at Columbia University under Franz Boas, and utilized for his own anthropology courses at the University of Pennsylvania; Speck's miscellaneous notes comprising circa 500 bibliographic cards and reading notes sorted out by tribe and/or language, dealing with tribes and countries in which Speck did no field work [other entries of this type are to be found among the various groups of materials in the Speck collection, according to tribe]; correspondence concerning exhibits and specimens for the Chicago World's Fair and for the Exposition of Indian Tribal Arts in New York City; two letters from Boas regarding the work of the Committee on Research in Native American Languages; correspondence regarding topics such as the double-curve motif, family hunting areas, indigenous foods and cooking methods, wampum, silverwork, birch-bark technique, baskets, Speck's research and publications, the research and publications of others, obtaining indigenous material cultural specimens for Speck, purchases of indigenous material culture specimens (baskets, masks, etc.) from Speck, Speck's identification of items in the Pitt Rivers Museum at Oxford University, Speck's bibliography, and Speck's obituary; letters requesting copies of Speck's publications, or acknowledging the transmission of publications between Speck and others; copies and/or drafts of several of Speck's presentations and publications, including "Lectures on Primitive Religion," "Land Ownership Among Hunting Peoples in Primitive America and the World's Marginal Areas," "Review of Lowie's Introduction to Cultural Anthropology," and "The Double-Curve Motive in Northeastern Algonquian Art"; a bibliography of Speck's publications through 1942; rough drafts of miscellaneous papers, 1928-1948; Speck's notes on topics such as crane posture; Birket-Smith's 1946 "Plan for Circumpolar Research"; ten distribution maps for circumpolar culture traits, colored in with crayon to show distribution of traits including divination and miracle shamanism, sweat bath, turtle Atlas myth and world-tree concept, bone divination, bear veneration, curative power of mystic words and formulae, dog-ancestor myth, dog as soul leader, curvilinear patterns, and confession to cure taboo violation; and a prepublication manuscript of Hallowell's "The nature and function of property as a human institution" with additions and corrections.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Tsimshian | Gitxsan | Nisga'a | Haisla | Tahltan
Alternate forms: Ts'msyan, Ts'msyen, Zimshian, Gitksan, Niska, Nisgah, Nisgha, Nishga, Nass
Language(s): English | German | Tsimshian
Date: 1893-1895, 1906-1909, 1915, 1920-1940, 1974
Type:Text
Extent: Approx. 1,000 slips 5 notebooks, 1500+ loose pages
Description: The Tsimshian materials in the ACLS collection consist of numerous items concentrated in the "Tsimshian" section of the finding aid. Noteworthy materials include texts, vocabularies, and notes on music recorded by Boas in the 1890s, along with an English-Tsimshian dictionary file. There is a large body of material recorded by William Beynon, including Vocabularies, notes on kinship, and a large body of stories (primarily in English) pertaining to primarily to Tsimshian history. (A full table of contents of these texts is available.) Also of note are Henry Tate's are texts sent to Boas by Henry Tate with interlinear texts, Vocabularies, and grammatical analyses by Amelia Susman from the late 1930s; an extensive lexicon file by an unidentified compiler (may be Susman); and essays on social organization and linguistics by Barbeau and Beynon. A set of cards, long identified as "Kwakiutl social organization," have been identified as "Tsimshian names file" now at the end of the Tsimshian section. This was likely compiled by William Beynon, and contains a few Gitxsan, Nisga'a, and Haisla ("Kitimat") names, and some with notes on kinship of "Tahltan Stickine origin." Some additional materials comparing Tsimshian and Nisga'a can be found in the "Nass" section of the finding aid.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)