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Apache | Arapaho | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Cree | Dakota | Lenape | Kiowa | Ojibwe | Pojoaque | Santa Clara | Shawnee | Tohono O'odham | Wichita | Zuni
Alternate forms: Sioux, Papago, Pueblo, Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1870-1934
Extent: 5 folders
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Of particular interest might be Folder "A:9770-1-118 Indians from Oklahoma (Work Sent in by Mr. Paul Roofe)" (1926), containing 118 pages of Individual Analysis Cards containing personal and family information about students at the Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas. There is also "Folder A:9770 #1. Indian Photographs, Bureau of American Ethnography" (1870-1912), containing 23 photographs of Native individuals, all men, most with both front and profile shots, and identifying information on the back. Cultures represented include Kiowa, Brule (Dakota), Apache, Delaware, Papago (Tohono O'odham), Arapaho, Wichita, Zuni, Santa Clara (Pueblo), Shawnee, Pojoaque (Pueblo), Cheyenne, and Bannock. Folder "A:9770 #3. American Indians" (1920-1934) contains material about Bolivia Indians, Chippewas (Ojibwe) in Michigan, and from Dr. Margaret W. Koenig of the Nebraska Medical Women's League regarding the family history of Permela Palmer (Chicksaw), who married a Choctaw and then a white man, and who was of particular note because of her supernumerary mammary glands and the similarly abnormal breast development of some of her daughters. Folder "A:974 x 7. Caucasian x Indian" (1920-1925) contains trait charts of mixed families, including charts of a French-Cree and Choctaw family and a French-Cree and Scotch-Cree family sent by Mrs. L. M. William of Battleford, Sask.; a three-page typed essay, "For a Universial Marriage Law," advocating the prohibition of mixed marriages, also attributed to Mrs. William; and a magazine article, intended to be humorous, titled "Indian Wives and White Husbands" by Josiah M. Ward. Folder "A:976 x 70. American Indian - Negro" (1919-1928) contains charts, anecdotal data, notes, etc. regarding the traits of mixed children of Native and African American parents, several examples of which are stamped State Normal School, Montclair, NJ; a letter from the state registrar of Virginia to the Census Bureau concerning the efforts of people trying to gain recogition as Chickahominy, Rappahannock, and other groups despite having been previously been designated as "mullatoes," fear about such people having "broken into the census as Indians," and from there "have gotten across into the white race," and hopes to clarify matters for the 1930 Censuses; and materials (interviews, family trees, forms, notes) from a study directed by A. H. Estabrook and I. E. McDougle of the Sociology Department of Sweet Briar College--with fieldwork (such as interviews) performed by Sweet Briar students--titled "The Isshys, An Indian-Negro-White Family Group Near Amherest, Virginia."
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Hopi | Tohono O'odham | Nahua | Zuni
Alternate forms: Papago, Aztec
Date: 1975-1977 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 25 folders
Description: There are several items relating to the Hopi language in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. Items are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II. In Subcollection I, there is relevant correspondence with Kenneth L. Hale (regarding passivity, clowning, and comparisons to Papago [Tohono O'odham] and Walbiri) and Dennis Tedlock (regarding Tedlock's Zuni consultants' dealings with Hopi) in Series I. Correspondence; a "Papago and Hopi" file in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries III-B: Works Authored by Voegelin; and 6 folders of Hopi material (mostly consisting of handwritten linguistic notes in pencil) in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-A: Language Notes. In Subcollection II, there is Hopi-related correspondence with Francis X. Grolling, S.J. (brief note mentioning two-hearted people and kachinas), Kenneth Hale (regarding Voegelin's Hopi research), Jerome Kirk (Voegelin mentions that his Hopi consultants prefer to use English directional terms), Ekkehart Malotki (regarding Hopi fieldwork and language), Joel M. Maring (regarding Eastern and Western Keresan and Hopi parallels), Raven I. McDavid, Jr. (brief note mentioning his enjoyment of Hopi fieldwork), Alice Schlegel (regarding teasing/humor), Morris Swadesh (mentions Charles Loloma), Unidentified (miscellaneous Hopi linguistic notes), and Gary Witherspoon (the world view problem, work of LaVerne Masayesva at MIT) in Series I. Correspondence. Also in Subcollection II, there is Hopi-Tewa material in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries VII. Kiowa-Tanoan; and two Hopi-related files in Subseries IX. Uto-Aztecan, except Hopi. These include a general "Hopi" folder and another folder of Edward A. Kennard's Hopi Texts, consisting of 5 typewritten texts in Hopi and English accompanied by two letters, Kennard to Voegelin, 1976-1977. There is also a copy of C. F. and F. M. Voegelin's "Hopi Number in Respect to Idiosyncracy" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries I: General works; Helmut Gipper's "The conception of time and space in Hopi: Some necessary corrections to the views of B.L. Whorf" in Series IV. Works by Others; and a file for Tetelcingo Nahuatl (with Hopi comparison) in Series V. Card Files.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Houma | Creek | Tohono O'odham | Akimel O'odham | Lenape
Alternate forms: Papago, Pima, Munsee
Language(s): English
Date: 1929-1947
Extent: 11 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Houma history and culture. Includes correspondence with Houma consultants such as members of the Billiot family, Ann Celestine, Dorothy Celestine, and Ben Paul about topics including museum specimens (a pirogue, beaded belts, baskets, blow guns, etc.), land questions, and schooling problems; correspondence with government officials and academic colleagues including Willard Beatty, William Zimmerman, Joseph McCaskill, Alice Marriott, and John Reed Swanton, and others regarding Speck's field work, various aspects of his research, and the social and economic conditions of the Houma people; a draft and copy of Speck's "Report...on Houma Indians" prepared for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, concerning the history and condition of the Houma and their educational needs; notes and correspondence regarding Houma medicine and traps; and Houma specimens consisting of six bone and wood points for canoe arrows and a model of canoe with two paddles.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Wichí | Tohono O'odham | Tepecano | Nahua | Huastec | Karankawa | Otomi | Mazahua | Matlatzinca | Pame | Chichimeca | Cuitlatec | Mazatec | Popoluca | Cuicatec | Amuzgo | Zapotec | Chatino | Chinantec | Purépecha | Tlapanec
Alternate forms: Papago, Tarascan, Tarasco
Language(s): English
Date: 1913-1966;
Extent: 165 pages; Circa 300 items;
Description: The Mexico materials, John Alden Mason Papers include a log of a trip to Sonora, itinerary of pack trip from Yecora to Maicoba; lists of photographs; journal. Archaological materials: report on archaeological sites near Rancho Guiracoba, Sonora, Mexico with report on surface collections at six sites in southern Sonora. Notes on the Northern Extension of the Chalchihuites Culture, written for the Mexican Historical Congress, Zacatecas. Slayton Creek Excavation, regarding Mexico; the Papago [Tohono O'odham]; a dig at Slayton Creek, Delaware. Regarding archaeological, ethnological, and linguistic work in Mexico; genetic classification of languages of Central America and Mexico. Regarding internal strife in local (Durango) Indian tribe (including murders); archaeology in Durango; collection of specimens of material culture; work at Schroeder pyramid; cliff dwellings near Mezquital. Mentions Alex Krieger. Cave investigations in Durango and Coahuila, report on search conducted with Robert H. Merrill for traces of early man, particularly on the Folsom horizon. Written for Weitlaner volume. Includes description of three varieties of Cucurbita moschata; evidence in conflict with the theory that Cucurbita moschata was introduced into southern Arizona in late prehistoric or early historic times from the north and east. Regarding Maya pottery; Piedras Negras, Guatemala; archaeological work in Mexico and Guatemala; the University Museum (University of Pennsylvania); Vaillant's obituary. Includes correspondence between Mason and Sue Vaillant (Mrs. George C.) and between Mason and Charles Marius Barbeau. Linguistic materials: a list entitled, "Familias linguisticas de Mexico-idiomas y dialectos a ellas pertencientes," with the families with subdivisions: for Museo nacional de arqueologia, historia y etnologia, Anales. Includes lexical items in the various languages--Hokan, Oto-Manguren, Uto-Aztecan, and Maya-- arranged in columns; Spanish glosses. Regarding Mason's Subtiaba-Hokan-Caduveo-Mataco comparative vocabulary. Kroeber is not much impressed with the possible resemblances in Mason's list (included). Mexican linguistics, comparative vocabularies, etc., includes short comparative vocabularies for Comecrudo, Papago-Tepecano, Nahua, Huaxtec, Choctaw, Coahuiltec, Karankawa, Torkana, Atakapa, Chitimacha, Tunica; notes on Sapir's classification; other miscellaneous notes. Comparative vocabulary, includes letter from Frederick Johnson to John Alden Mason; comparative vocabulary which is number-keyed to a list of twenty-two languages and arranged in columns headed by Spanish glosses. Words lacking in some languages for almost all items. Languages include Otomi, Mazahua, Matlatzinca, Ocuiltec, Pame, Chichimeca, Cuitlateco, Mazatec, Popoluca, Chochotec (Tlapanec), Ichcateco, Trique, Chiapanec, Manque, Mixtec, Cuicatec, Amuzgo, Zapotec, Chatino, Chinantec, Tarasco, and Tlapanec. Scholarly materials: two versions of a paper, entitled, "Los Cuatro Grandes Filones Linguisticos de Mexico y Centroamerica," for the International Congress of Americanists, August 1939, Mexico. Photographs: Unidentified photographs showing people, dwellings, terrain, etc. Images of temples, excavations, crypts, jade work, etc. Includes a photograph of John Alden Mason and Burton W. Bascom from Palenque. Entire series of photographs from the Mason papers. The bulk of the images are from Mexico (Chihuahua, Durango, Sonora, etc.). Also 3 contact sheets of images from Peru. From the Durango expedition, a list of photographs; "Informes hacera de la Sierro de la Candela:" notes from Tarayre, pages 184-185; "Ruins of an agricultural colony near Zape"; possible routes of migration into Mexico; Everardo Gamiz "La Raza Pigmea," Durango, April 1934; an incomplete set of numbered photos enumerated in above list (all duplicates from museum set). A linguistic realignment north of Mexico, which gives six phyla, one "broken phylum," and two uncertain languages (for presentation at the meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Chicago, 1940) and a detailed outline of five phyla plus several unaffiliated languages.
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Denesuline | Hopi | Navajo | Ojibwe | Seminole | Tohono O'odham
Alternate forms: Chipewyan, Pima, Papago, Dënesųłiné
Language(s): English
Date: 1964-1984
Extent: 7 folders
Description: The North American materials in the James V. Neel papers consists materials related to Neel's genetics and populations studies among some indigenous people in the Southwest and Great Lakes region. The bulk of these materials are found in "Series IIa: Amerindian," "Series IIIa: Amerindian," and "Series IV: Committees." These materials can be located most quickly by doing a keyword search in the aid for the culture terms listed above.
Collection: James V. Neel Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.96)

Tohono O'odham
Alternate forms: Papago
Language(s): English | Tohono O'odham
Date: Undated
Contributor: Enos, Susie | Ventura, Jose
Type:Text
Extent: 31 pages
Description: Susie Enos was a native speaker of Tohono O'Odham and an early writer of her language. This text, collected by Enos from a consultant, Jose Ventura, "Ho'ok Oks" (Witch, Green Hawk, Eagle), includes indications of the syntactic function elements in the sentences and other grammatical notes, with a separate, line-by-line English translation.
Collection: Papago Stories narrated by Jose Ventura (Mss.497.P21)

Quechua | Cocama | Tohono O'odham | Akimel O'odham | Cocama
Alternate forms: Papago, Pima
Date: 1941-1948
Type:Text
Extent: 4 items
Description: Materials relating to Quechua language and culture. Includes John Peabody Harrington's correspondence with John Alden Mason regarding Harrington's work on the Hokan nature of Quechua and on Pima-Papago [Tohono O'odham, and possibly Akimel O'odham]; Harrington's "The nominal derivational suffixes of Quechua" with a list of the suffixes with examples, a brief discussion by Harrington, and Mason's comments; Harrington's "Adjective derivational suffixes of Quechua," a listing of suffixes with brief comments and one slip of Mason's comments; and Harrington and Luis Valcárcel's "Grammarlets of the Quechua and Cocama languages," with grammatical sketch of Quechua and a very brief sketch of Cocama [Cocama-Cocamilla].
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Tarahumara | Tohono O'odham
Alternate forms: Papago
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1962
Type:Text
Genre: Essays | Drafts
Extent: 9 folders
Description: Several items relating to the Tarahumara language have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. They are all in Subcollection II. Tarahumara is one of the languages Voegelin considered in a grammatical analysis of Uto-Aztecan languages. Drafts of seven chapters of this work can be found in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries III: Uto-Aztecan book. There are also two items in Series IV. Works by Others, consisting of Kenneth L. Hale's "Papago (Tohono O'odham) and Tarahumara" and David Brambila's review of Hale. Researchers might also be interested in the general Uto-Aztecan entry for the Voegelin Papers.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

O'dam | Tepecano | Tohono O'odham | Akimel O'odham
Alternate forms: Papago, Pima, Tepehuan
Date: 1916-1967
Type:Text
Extent: 21 items
Description: Materials relating to John Alden Mason's interest in and research on Tepehuan language and culture. Northern Tepehuan is most prominently represented in this collection, though references to "Southern Tepehuan" indicate the presence of data on what are now distinguished as the Southeastern Tepehuan and Southwestern Tepehuan languages. Items focused on Northern Tepehuan include Mason's report from the Northern Tepehuan Linguistic Expedition, Baborigame, Chihuahua, Mexico (1951); his Northern Tepehuan linguistics file, containing circa 350 cards with words, phrases, and sentences with Spanish glosses and occasionally some Tepecano and Papago [Tohono O'odham] cognates; two 1936 notebooks on Northern Tepehuan linguistics with vocabulary and texts with Spanish glosses based on work with consultant Pedro Valencia; two 1951 notebooks on Northern Tepehuan linguistics with grammatical notes and texts from wire recordings; 20 pages of Northern Tepehuan texts with interlinear Spanish translation; 20 pages of texts relating to myths, official speeches, settling marital difficulties, etc. with interlinear Spanish 14 pages on Northern Tepehuan morphology concerned primarily with suffixes, taken from the files of Burton W. Bascom; 5 pages of Northern Tepehuan miscellaneous notes including verb conjugation labeled "Bascom" and a map; and two copies of "The Sacred Case" in Northern Tepehuan with English translation, attributed to Juan Dolores. There is one item focused on Southern Tepehuan, comprised of seven notebooks of Southern Tepehuan field notes containing grammatical notes, texts, and some transcriptions and translations of recordings at the American Philosophical Society (see also #3738). More general or comparative materials include Mason's "The Primitive Religions of Mexico" (1916), a paper read at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (Tepecano prayers to accompany the paper lacking); Mason's "Notes on the Linguistic and Cultural Affiliations of the Tepehuan and Tepecano," written for the Mexican Historical Congress, Zacatecas (1948); Mason's "Tepehuan of Northern Mexico" (1958), regarding observations on the culture which were made incidental to linguistic fieldwork (includes original and two copies with maps); lists of perdones Tepehuanes and notes on same; comparative lists from Southern and Northern dialects of Tepehuan, with English glosses and comments, by Burton W. Bascom and based on his work in 1943-1944 under the auspices of the Summer Institute of Linguistics; 14 pages of kinship terms in Southern Tepehuan, Northern Tepehuan, and Tepecano with English glosses; and a notebook containing a digest of Rinaldini's Tepehuane taken from the book in the Ayer Collection, Newberry Library. Correspondence includes letters from Burton W. Bascom regarding Northern Tepehuan with some mention of Tepecano, Pima [Akimel O'odham], Papago [Tohono O'odham], and Southern Tepehuan, and including a short paper by Bascom on the Northern Tepehuan possessive -ga, a Northern Tepehuan verb list for comparison with Mason's Tepecano list, and a discussion of noun plural formation with examples; Brete R. Hart regarding receipt of material on Utaztecan, work on alphabet for Southern Tepehuan, and a brief description of Fiesta for the Dead observed at Xoconoxtle, Durango, Mexico; Phil C. Weigland regarding acculturation, history, and relations with whites in San Sebastian and Azqueltan; and a report and correspondence from John Hobgood concerning events transpiring during a visit by John Hobgood and Carroll L. Riley to Santa Maria Ocotlan: their presentation of letters, request for permission to study the Tepehuan language and customs of the village, and interactions with the villagers. Hobgood mentions Agnes McClain Howard as well as Carroll L. Riley.
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Tohono O'odham
Alternate forms: Papago
Language(s): English
Date: 1951-1954
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Tohono O'odham materials in the Elisabeth Tooker Papers are found in multiple sections of the finding aid. Most are labelled as "Papago" by Tooker. In Series I, see correspondence with Donald Bahr. There may be additional relevant material in other correspondence folders. In Series III, see "Acculturation, Urbanization and the Papagos" and Tooker's Master's thesis, "Papagos in Tuscson: An Introduction to Their History, Community Life, and Acculturation." In Series VI, see "Papago negatives, Louis Henry Morgan Library." In Series V there are 4 folders of Tooker's Tohono O'odham research files. These materials may be restricted due to culturaly sensitivity or privacy concerns. In Series VI, there are approximately 300 black and white gelatin photographs of Tohono O’odham in Tucson, Arizona taken by Tooker for her masters and doctoral theses from 1952-1958, of social customs including ceremonial dances, races, processions, and dwellings.
Collection: Elisabeth Tooker Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.84)