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Anishinaabe | Blackfoot | Cree | Dakota | Métis | Kainai | Nakoda | Ojibwe | Secwépemc
Alternate forms: Blood, Ojibwa, Saulteaux, Shuswap, Simpcw, Sioux, Stoney
Language(s): English
Date: 1905-1910
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: Norman Leonard Jacobs was an engineer and surveyor with the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway in Canada. The collection consists of his correspondence with Bessie Frank (later Anathan), an acquaintance from Pittsburgh. Jacobs wrote of daily life in Canadian cities like Winnipeg and Edmonton, interactions with First Nations, and daily hardships encountered in the field (extreme cold, snowblindness, and lack of food), but also spoke of his work with pride and enthusiasm. In addition to the letters, Jacobs wrote twenty-eight pages of a "Diary of a Tenderfoot." Also included in the collection are two photobooks and various loose photographs, which display various aspects of camp life, details of work sites and the Canadian landscape, and First Nations peoples. Some of the photographs are extremely faded. Native peoples mentioned include Ojibwe, Blackfoot, Cree, "Surteau" (likely Saulteaux),"Bloods" (Kainai), "Stonies" (Nakoda, or "Stoney"), as well as Native people at Tete Jaune Cache who are likely Simpcw. The images include family groups; men, women, and children fishing; men (some apparently hired by Jacobs or his company to act as guides and carriers in the field) working with an infant in a cradleboard; Ojibwe graves; tepees [tipis]; "Sioux" warriors; a sweat bath; horse races; individuals like Joe KaeKwitch, Chief Handorgan, Chief Wingard, Muskowken, etc. Most of these materials have been digitized and are available through the APS's Digital Library. Also see the finding aid for more background information on Jacobs and detailed itemized lists for both Series I. Correspondence and Series II. Graphic Materials.
Collection: Anathan-Jacobs Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Collection (Mss.SMs.Coll.13)

Anishinaabe | Cayuse | Klallam | Cree | Dakelh | Haida | Heiltsuk | Kalapuya | Klickitat | Ktunaxa | Nez Perce | Nisga'a | Nuxalk | Ojibwe | Secwépemc | Squamish | Syilx | Tlingit | Walla Walla
Alternate forms: Bella Bella, Bella Coola, Carrier, Haíɫzaqv, Kootenai, Kootenay, Kutenai, Nehiyaw, Okanagan, Okanagon, Saulteaux, Shuswap, Skwxwú7mesh, Clallam, S'Klallam, nəxʷsƛ̕ay̕əm, Niska, Nishga, Nisgha
Date: 1834-1836
Type:Text
Genre: Notebooks
Extent: 2 volumes
Description: This collection contains two manuscript volumes collected by the naturalist John Kirk Townsend, obtained by dictation from native speakers, people of mixed ancestry, and traders of the Hudson's Bay Company. The first volume contains a collection of multiple comparative vocabulary lists of languages of modern-day Washington, Idaho, Oregon, British Columbia, and Alaska, obtained by dictation from native speakers, people of mixed ancestry, and traders of the Hudson's Bay Company. Languages included are: "Okanagan" (N̓səl̓xcin), "Attnaha" or "Shoushwap" (Secwepemctsin), "Walla Walla (Sahaptin), "Squalyamish" (Squamish / Sḵwx̱wú7mesh ?), "Nooselalum" (Klallam / nəxʷsƛ̕ay̕əm), "Haeeltzuk" (Heiltsuk), "Billichoola" (Nuxalk), "Nass" (Nisga'a), "Haidah" (Haida), "Tongaase" (Tlingit, possibly inland variety), Nez Perce, Chinook [Jargon], "Carrier or Takelhé" (Dakelh), "Kayouse" (Cayuse), and "Kootenai" (Ktunaxa). The second volume is a collection of vocabulary lists of 19 Indigenous languages, primarily of the Pacific Northwest, re-copied from earlier notes in an orderly fashion with an index and additional introductory information on the area where each language is spoken and the source of the vocabulary. 15 of the vocabularies are re-copied out from the first volume in this collection. This volume includes the languages listed for that volume, plus Cree (possibly Plains Cree), "Kalapooyah" (Kalapuya), Klikatat (Sahaptin or Yakama), and "Seauteux" (Western Ojibwa/Ojibwe).
Collection: John Kirk Townsend Indian vocabularies collection (Mss.497.3.T66)

Nlaka'pamux | Secwépemc | Syilx
Alternate forms: Okanagan, Okanagon, Shuswap, Thompson
Language(s): English
Date: 1980-1981
Extent: 16 hr., 46 min. : DIGITIZED
Description: Audio recordings of traditional and autobiographical Okanagan stories, recorded by Wendy C. Wickwire in Hedley and Merritt, British Columbia in 1980-1981. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Okanagan Stories (Mss.Rec.116)

Secwépemc
Alternate forms: Shuswap, Interior Salish
Language(s): English | Secwepemc
Date: 1900-1928, 1974
Type:Text
Extent: 1000+ pages
Description: The Secwepemc materials in the ACLS collection consist of materials found in multiple sections of the finding aid. In the "Shuswap" section of the finding aid, there are vocabularies recorded by Boas and Teit which include names of tribes and other information. In the "Thompson" section, Teit's "Salish ethnographic materials" includes some Secwepemc notes, as does Teit's notebooks that make up "Field notes or Thompson and neighboring Salish languages." (The extent of Secwepemc material in these notebooks is undetermined as the material does not yet have a detailed contents listing.) In the "Chinook Jargon" section of the finding aid, "Indian legends of the North Pacific coast of North America" includes some Secwepemc legends. In the "Kutenai" section, there are some Secwepemc stories in Teit's "Folkloristic tales from the Salish area." In the "Lillooet" section, Teit's "Lillooet vocabulary" includes some comparative Secwepemc words. In the "Salish" section, Teit's "Salish ethnographic notes" includes information on Secwepemc artifacts sent to museums, and "Songs for the Salish area" includes notes on 80 songs (some of which are Secwepemc) recorded for and sent to the National Museum of Canada (now the Canadian Museum of History.)
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)