Current Filters
Click filter to remove
Displaying 1 - 10 of 19
Anishinaabe | Odawa
Alternate forms: Odawa
Language(s): English | Ottawa
Date: 1947-1948, 2000
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: Transcriptions and interlinear English translations by Howard Webkamigad of 13 Odawa (Anishinaabe) stories, 1 Odawa (annishinaabe) conversation, and 1 English story (transcription only), from wire recordings in Mss.Rec.1, "Ottawa material, 1947-1948."
Collection: Anishinaabe Language Tape Transcriptions of Anishinaabe Language Recordings by anishinaabe People from the Traverse Area of Michigan During the 1940s (Mss.SMs.Coll.20)

A'aninin | Anishinaabe | Apache | Apache, Plains | Apache, Western | Arapaho | Arikara | Assiniboine | Blackfoot | Caddo | Catawba | Cayuga | Cherokee | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Comanche | Creek | Crow | Lenape | Flathead | Haudenosaunee | Ho-Chunk | Hopi | Houma | Iñupiat | Iowa | Isleta | Kaw | Kickapoo | Laguna | Lakota | Mandan | Menominee | Meskwaki | Munsee | Nez Perce | Ojibwe | Omaha | Oneida | Otoe | Odawa | Penobscot | Pawnee | Ponca | Potawatomi | Quapaw | Seminole | Seneca | Shawnee | Shoshone | Stockbridge-Munsee | Tsimshian | Wabanaki | Wichita | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Arapahoe, Chippewa, Eskimo, Gros Ventre, Iroquois, Kansa, Lenape, Muscogee, Niimíipu, Odawa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Salish, Sioux, Sac-and-Fox, Sauk-and-Fox, Winnebago, Wyandotte
Language(s): English
Date: 1939-1943
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: There are a few items in the Frank G. Speck Papers currently identified as relating to Indian boarding schools.In the collection guide, under Subcollection 1, Series 1, in Section IV, "Southeast," see item IV(15H3), "Yuchi miscellaneous notes," which contains a letter from Ann Rolland (Haskell Institute), to Speck, April 6, 1941, as well as items under "C. Houma (Louisiana)" that relate to mission schools. In Section XIII, "Miscellaneous," see item XIII(22H), "Haskell Institute Roster," which lists of Native students and the Haskell Institute boarding school in 1939-1940, giving name, age, address, and tribe. (The tribes of the students included are listed above in this entry.) In Subcollection I, Series II, Biographical Material, see letters (listed alphabetically by author) from Leona E. Giger and Ann Rolland, both students at Haskell in the early 1940s. Also see letter from "Redge" and Gladys Laulin regarding Chippewa boy returning home for dances. In Series III, Photographs, there is an undated photograph [#10-14(a)] from the Shingwauk Indian Residential School. See also school-related photos in folders "Creek #3," "Eskimo [Inuit] (Labrador) #4," "Houma #1," #2, #7, and #8, "Pamunkey #6," and "Penobscot: People #2." In Series IV, Lantern Slides, there are slides of Native and Black students at the Hampton Institute. More boarding school-related material may be identified in the collection with further research.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Anishinaabe | Odawa
Alternate forms: Odawa
Language(s): English
Date: 1767
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume, 16 p.
Description: The full title of this manuscript is "Estimate of the Fur and Peltry Trade in the District of Michilimackinac, according to the bounds and limits, assign'd to it by the French, when under their government: together with an account of the situation and names of the several out-posts." Robert Rogers was commander of Fort Michilimackinac from 1766-1768. Rogers gave this manuscript to Jonathan Carver (the man he has sent on an expedition to find the Northwest Passage), who relayed it to Thomas Barton of Lancaster, Pa., who, in turn, sent it to the American Philosophical Society. It was received at the APS and referred to the Committee on Trade and Commerce on December 20, 1768. The manuscript may be the first separate manuscript collected by the American Philosophical Society.
Collection: Estimate of the Fur and Peltry Trade in the District of Michilimackinac (Mss.970.1.R63)

Anishinaabe | Mohawk | Odawa | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Odawa
Language(s): English
Date: 1754-1757
Type:Text
Extent: 3 items
Description: Letters to Governors Denny and Morris regarding rumors about French and Indian movements; arrival of 400 French, 200 Conawagas [Kahnawakes, or Mohawks], and Ottoways [Odawas] ready to move; 1,100 French and 70 Arondacks at French Fort on Monongahela. Trader and former captive John Patten's statement that the French keep Native women and children in forts while the men are hunting, and offer fine camping grounds.
Collection: Indian and Military Affairs of Pennsylvania, 1737-1775 (Mss.974.8.P19)

Arapaho | Caddo | Cherokee | Cheyenne | Comanche | Lenape | Kiowa | Meskwaki | Osage | Otoe | Odawa | Pawnee | Ponca | Quapaw | Seneca-Cayuga | Shawnee | Yuchi
Alternate forms: Arapahoe
Language(s): English
Date: 1973-1974
Genre: Songs | Speeches
Extent: 36 audiocassettes (33 hr., 53 min.)
Description: Recordings of powwows, benefit dances, wedding dances, dance competitions, and other permonances at various grounds in Oklahoma and Missouri from 1973-1974 by Sue Roark-Calnek. Includes round dances, stomp dances, war dances, gourd dances, snake dances, buffalo dances, hand games, and others. Dancers, singers, and staff are Arapaho, Caddo, Cayuga, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Delaware, Fox, Hopi, Kiowa, Osage, Ottawa, Oto, Pawnee, Ponca, Quapaw, Seneca, Shawnee, and Yuchi. Includes Delaware and Quapaw Pow-Wow, Osage Inloska Society, Arapaho Starhawk Society, Nevada (Mo.) Bushwhacker Days Pow-Wow, and White Oak Shawnee Night Stomp Dance, Kihekah Steh Pow-Wow, and Seneca-Cayuga Green Corn Ceremonial and Stomp Dance. Some materials may be restricted due to cultural sensitivity and privacy concerns.
Collection: Indian performances in Oklahoma (Mss.Rec.107)

Anishinaabe | Haudenosaunee | Oneida | Seneca | Cherokee | Choctaw | Ojibwe | Dakota | Odawa | Nez Perce
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Sioux, Odawa, Ojijbway
Language(s): English
Date: 1960
Type:Text
Extent: 1 reel
Description: In this doctoral dissertation (Cornell University, 1960), Berkhofer compares and contrasts the differing missionary activities of Quakers, Moravians, Congregationalists, Presbyterians, Baptists, and Methodists, to reactions among the Oneida, Seneca, Cherokee, Choctaw, Ojibwa [Ojibwe], Sioux [Dakota], Ottawa [Odawa], and Nez Perce.
Collection: Protestant missionaries to the American Indians, 1787 to 1862 (Mss.Film.1157)

Abenaki | Cherokee | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Dakota | Odawa | Ojibwe | Miami | Osage | Pawnee | Penobscot | Stockbridge-Munsee
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Sioux, Ottawa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Chippewa, Stockbridge, Wabanaki
Language(s): English
Date: 1817-1883
Type:Text
Extent: 64 reels
Description: These papers include letters, reports, accounts, and memoranda relating to the work of the American Board of Home Missions among the Abenaki, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Dakota, Ojibwa, Miami, Osage, Pawnee, Penobscot, and Stockbridge-Munsee peoples of Arkansas, New York, and Oregon. Originals in Houghton Library, Harvard University.
Collection: Papers,1817-1883, relating to North American Indian missions (Mss.Film.1223)

Anishinaabe | Odawa
Alternate forms: Odawa
Language(s): Ottawa | English
Date: 1947-1948
Extent: 21 sound tape reels (8 hr., 28 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: This collection consists of Ottawa songs, interviews, Vocabularies, legends, Nanabojo stories, autobiographical stories, and information on Ottawa history. Some of the material is given in both Ottawa and English, some in Ottawa only. Recordings in Series 1 made by Jane Ettawageshik in Philadelphia in 1947, and Series 2 in Michigan in 1948. Transcriptions and translations of some of the collection can be found in Mss.SMs.Coll.20, "Anishinaabe Language Tape Transcriptions of Anishinaabe Language Recordings by Anishinaabe People from the Traverse Area of Michigan During the 1940s". (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Ottawa material (Mss.Rec.1)

Anishinaabe | Odawa
Alternate forms: Odawa
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1951-1952
Type:Text
Extent: 9 folders
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history. Though further research might yield more results, approximately nine items directly pertaining to the Odawa (called Ottawa by Wallace) have been identified. Most of these materials are located in Series IX. Indian Claims, and relate to Wallace's work as a researcher and expert witness on behalf of Native American land claims. They include research notes, tribal histories, court dockets, trial memoranda, and a copy of Robert F. Bauman's "Ottawa, the Huron-Wyandot, and the Land" with several pages of handwritten notes [Robert F. Bauman was a lawyer and historian who specialized for a time as a research historian on Indian claims for a Cleveland law firm and was also briefly director of the Dearborn Historical Museum in the early 1950s.] See also the Omer Call Stewart file in Series I. Correspondence. See the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's long and varied career, and for an itemized list of the collection's contents.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)

Anishinaabe | Odawa
Alternate forms: Odawa
Language(s): English
Date: November 11, 1766
Subject: Diplomacy | Treaties
Type:Text
Extent: 2 pages
Description: Letter informing Franklin that Sir William Johnson has had a treaty with Pontiac and a great number of southern Indians at Oswego, and has settled matters to their satisfaction.
Collection: Benjamin Franklin Papers (Mss.B.F85)