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Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway
Language(s): Chippewa | English
Date: 1938; 1951-1952
Extent: 253 pages, 26 cards, 2 maps
Description: The Ojibwe materials in the ACLS collection consist of two items in the "Ojibwa" section of the finding aid. One is Swadesh's "Chippewa field notes," which includes a story and other language information given by Ted St. Germaine of Lac du Flambeau, who attended the Carlisle Indian School, obtained a law degree at Yale in 1913, played as a tackle in the NFL in 1922, became the first Native American admitted to the bar in Wisconsin, and later served as tribal judge for Lac du Flambeau. This section also includes Joe Pierce's "Shawnee, Kickapoo, Ojibwa, Sauk-and-Fox materials," containing discussion of dialect and language relationships, translations of texts, tests, and degree of linguistic relationships. (The Ojibwe in Pierce's work is that spoken at Mount Pleasant.) In the "Northeast" section of the finding aid, two maps annotated by hand by Speck include linguistic and hunting territories, include that for Ojibwe groups.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Chippewa
Language(s): English | Chippewa
Date: 1826
Type:Text
Extent: 3 volumes, 29 watercolor illustrations
Description: A record of a journey undertaken by Thomas L. McKenney and Lewis Cass, from Washington, D.C., to Fond du Lac, Wisc., to negotiate a treaty with the Chippewa and other Indians. McKenney, the Superindenant of Indian Affairs, includes an account of travel on the Great Lakes and a description of the "character" and customs of the Chippewa Indians, an account of the treaty of Fond du Lac, and a vocabulary of the Algic or Chippewa language. The manuscript, a fair copy of the original sent to a London publisher, is illustrated throughout with watercolor sketches of scenes and persons. It was originally published in Baltimore in 1827. Schoolcraft-Gallatin Chippewa vocabulary appears at beginning, but the manuscript lacks appendices found in the printed text. Watercolors are different in small details, superior in color to printed text.
Collection: Sketches of a Tour to the Lakes (Mss.917.7.M19)