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Anishinaabe | Chickasaw | Dakota | Lenape | Ojibwe | Osage | Pawnee
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Chippewa, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1804-1805
Type:Text
Genre: Journals
Extent: 1 volume
Description: This collection contains three manuscript journals of exploration expedition, bound together in one volume: one journal by Zebulon Pike, two journals by William Dunbar. The Pike journal documents the expedition to explore the geography of the Mississippi River led by Lt. Zebulon Montgomery Pike in 1805-1806, and his attempts to purchase sites from the Dakota Indians for future military posts, and to bring influential chiefs back to St. Louis for talks. Dunbar's journald document the expedition up the Red and Ouachita Rivers to the Hot Springs of Arkansas in 1804-1805. The "Journal... to the Mouth of the Red River" (200p.) is the fullest available record of the activities of the expedition from the time of their departure from St. Catharine's Landing on October 16, 1804, until their return to Natchez, Miss., on January 26, 1805. The "Journal of a geometrical survey" includes a record of course and distances as well as a thermometrical log and other brief notes. The second of these mention Osage and Caddo, their relations with whites (enemies and friends), trade to Osages with Delaware Indian as aid, and Chickasaw.
Collection: Expedition Journals (Mss.917.7.D91)

Haudenosaunee | Cherokee | Catawba | Shawnee | Lenape | Wyandot | Miami | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: January 22, 1736; 1744-1774; November 3, 1768; March 14, 1792; 1794; March 10, 1796; August 28, 1817; October 7, 1892; November 11, 1913; November 20, 1913; 1952; 1953-1954; September 1954; Undated
Type:Text
Extent: 14 items
Description: Relavent materials can be found in the finding aid under the specific dates listed. A variety of materials relating to the Haudenosaunee. Eighteenth-century materials include James Logan's treaty instructions to Conrad Weiser in 1736/7; examples of symbols used in treaty signatures by chiefs; miscellaneous items relating to treaties, Indian raids, and land transfers in Virginia;a 1768 deed of land to William Trent; using the Haudenosaunee to make peace with western tribes; Indian agents' accounts, and a journal of a survey of Moravian lands in the Erie triangle translated and edited by Paul A. W. Wallace. Nineteenth-century materials include correspondence regarding Iroquois language and an Iroquois census. Twentieth-century materials include lectures given by Wallace and Leland (on Benjamin Franklin, and on the Deerfield massacre and Eleazer Williams' claim to be the Lost Dauphin, respectively); correspondence between Newhouse and Parker about Newhouse's manuscript history of the "Five Nations Union," the Society of American Indians and possible creation of a Society of Canadian Indians; and Snyderman's essay on ethnohistory, particularly through materials at the American Philosophical Society, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the Quaker Historical Association, and the Haverford College Library. Other individuals mentioned include Shekallemy, Samuel Kirkland, Alfred, Street, Captain Brant, LIttle Billy, George Hoopaugh, Jacob Harmon, John Williams, Warham Williams, Madame de Pentigny, Captain John Stoddard, and John H. Hanson.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Lenape | Haudenosaunee | Shawnee | Nanticoke | Mohawk | Seneca | Onondaga | Meskwaki | Mahican | Wyandot | Ojibwe | Miami | Kickapoo | Mingo
Alternate forms: Lenape, Iroquois, Fox, Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1760
Type:Text
Extent: 1 reel
Description: Christian Frederick Post was a Moravian missionary and observer of Native peoples and cultures; he was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1768. This journal of Post's, who was in the company of fellow colonist John Hays and Delaware leader Teedyuscung (and also mentions Delawares Isaac Still and Moses Tattamy), relates to Post's mission as a representative of the Governor and Council of Pennsylvania to the Ohio Valley Indians and the conference held near the Ohio River in 1760. Copy in clerk's hand. Concerning message carried to Mingos (Haudenosaunee, in the Ohio Valley) and other Ohio Indians, return of colonists taken captive during the Seven Years' War, and other happenings on the journey. Includes description of conjuring ceremony. This is a microfilm of an original in possession of Mrs. Henry P. Gummere.
Collection: Journal, 1760, of the great council of the different Indian nations (Mss.Film.204)

Lenape | Ojibwe | Shawnee
Alternate forms: Lenape, Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1793-1819
Extent: 1 reel
Description: This journal of Moravian missionary John Gottlieb Ernestus Heckewelder covers travels among the Indians to a conference in Detroit in 1793. Includes a list of the names of different Indian nations in North America, their locations, and number of fighting men. Also contains miscellaneous materials: a letter from Heckewelder to Mordecai Churchman, October 5, 1819, mentioning Peter S. Du Ponceau; engraving of Heckewelder possibly from a painting at the American Philosophical Society; a 1-page letter of Maria Heckewelder to Matthew S. Henry requesting him to relinquish the volume; and some Heckewelder letters. Originals at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.
Collection: Journey with the commissioners to the Indian treaty (Mss.Film.805.1)

Haudenosaunee | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1845-1881
Type:Text
Extent: 2 reels
Description: Materials of ethnologist and anthropologist Lewis Henry Morgan. Reel 1: Lorimer Fison and Alfred W. Howitt to Morgan, 1865-1881, 455 pages. Materials pertaining to geology, etc., 194 pages. Materials pertaining to Morgan's secret society, Grand Council of the Iroquois, by Morgan, 156 pages, by others, 105 pages. Rules, Constitutions, etc., 44 pages. Volume 1 of Morgan manuscript journals, 394 pages. Reel 2: Volumes 2-6 of Morgan manuscript journals, 453, 532, 385, 456, and 552 pages. The journal includes notes on travels to New York and Michigan, conversations, and Indian councils. Record of Indian letters [i.e., Record of the inquiry concerning the Indian system of relationship...], volume 1, letters sent, 230 pages; volume 2, letters received, 279 pages. (Includes related correspondence). Printed table of contents (1936). [See also, for descriptive contents, Rochester Historical Society Publication Fund Series 2: 83-97; and White (1959).] Originals in the Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester.
Collection: Lewis Henry Morgan journal and correspondence, 1845-1876 (Mss.Film.582)

Quinault | Arikara | Assiniboine | Clatsop | Chehalis | Chinook | Wasco-Wishram | Tillamook | Shoshone | Mandan | Nez Perce | Arapaho | Ojibwe | Yakama | Osage
Language(s): English
Date: Circa March 1806; January 6-10, 1806; November 19, 1805-January 29, 1806; January 1-March 20, 1806; March 21-May 23, 1806;
Type:Text
Extent: 4 pages; 1 map
Description: Estimate of "western Indians," includes 48 tribal names, many of which do not correspond to contemporary tribal names.
Collection: Lewis and Clark Journals (Mss.917.3.L58)

Blackfoot | Dakota | Walla Walla | Nez Perce | Mandan | Shoshone | Hidatsa | Arikara | Crow | Chinook | Wishram | Assiniboine | Sahaptin | Pawnee | Osage | Kickapoo | Omaha | Lakota | Cheyenne | Arapaho | Kiowa | Ojibwe | Cree | A'aninin | Salish | Meskwaki
Alternate forms: Atsina, Gros Ventre, Sioux, Flathead, Sauk-and-Fox
Language(s): English
Date: 1804-1806
Type:Text
Extent: 6 red morocco book; 80 pages; 3 notebooks; 1 volume;
Description: The Plains materials in the Lewis and Clark journals includes observations on the Arikaras, Assiniboines, Blackfoot, Mandan, Minnetaree, Shoshoni, Blackfoot, Flathead-Tushepaw, Dakota Sioux, Mandan, and Minnetaree, Otos, Sauks, Iowa, Kansas, Kickapoo, Missouri, Omaha, Osage, Pawnees, Ponca, Sioux, Cheyenne (Arapaho), Arikara, Blackfoot, Crow, Kansas, Kiowa, Sioux, Yankton, Memacarjo, Teton, Waupatone, Cascarba, Sisseton, Waupacootar, Hoindeborto, Tecarton, Newastarton, Micacuopsiba, and Siouan, Minnetaree (Gros Ventre), Shoshoni, Assiniboine, Teton Sioux, Mandan, Hidatsa, Showhoni, Arikara, Castahan, Crow, Flathead (Tushepaw), Ootlashoot. The correspondence includes Two letters of Lewis to Jefferson at conclusion of expedition. Replies to questions 6, 7, and 8 concerning Place names and measurement of time and distance; Indian songs. Probably an enclosure in Clark to Biddle, December 7, 1810, printed in Jackson (1962m): 562-564. For Biddle queries see Jackson (1962): 550-554. Mentions Snake, Shoshoni, Castahana, Nemison, Crow or Arpsarrozah, Maw or Pashapalorah. Refers to Indians of Missouri River only: Kanzes, Oto, Missouri, Ponca, Panias (Loups, Republicans), Mahars, Ricares, Mandan, Minetares, Maharha, Ayhawies, Saukes and Reynards, Assiniboine, Christinoes, Cheyenne, Cannarwesh. Mentions Snake Indians. 24 tribes are listed with population, trade, language, and character information included in parallel columns: Osage, Kansas, Otto, Panias, Mahas, Poncaro, Ricaras, Mandans, Ahwahhawa, Minnetaree, Iowa, Saukie; Sioux (Wahparton, Mindawarcarton, Wahpacta, Sissatoni, Yankton, Yankton ah nah, Teton, Teton O Kandandas, Teton Minzarkine, Teton sah one.) Indian tribes mentioned: Cataka, Castahana, Anauawa, Mahar, Sharah-Cheyenne, Ricares, Panias (Loups, Republicans), Padoucas, Cayauwas, Wetapato, Cannavich, Stateton. Mentions Arikara, Gros Ventres, Mandan, Marhaha, Minnetaree, Sioux, and Teton in diary.Arikara (Beuffles de Medecine lodge), Aunahhow or Aunerhoo, Nootarwau, Toowarsar, Tohpahcass, Weheskeu, Wetersoon, (Hidatsa), Arapaho, Assiniboine, Cheyenne, Chippewa, Cree, Crow, Fox, Paduca, Pawnee, Sioux (Sisseton, Teton), Mandan, Minnetaree (Gros Ventre), Shoshoni. Includes list of nations who trade with Arikaras: Aunerhoo, Nootarwau, Toowarsar, Tohpahcass, Weheeskeu-chien, Kunnanarwesh (Arapaho), Tochewahcoo (Fox), Cattarkah (Paducar), Kiewah, Sharhachien. Discusses Arikara, Cheyenne, Comanche, Crow, Kansas, Kickapoo, Mandan, Minnetaree, Omaha, Osage, Dakota, and Teton and Yankton Sioux. Includes list of Crow bands: Shiptahcha, Apsharookee (Absaroka). Also Ecupscuppeah (Tushepaw band) together with locations. Draft list of Western Indians and their locations in Summary of Rivers (Codex N:128-142): Chillatehokle, Potoash, Queets (Quaitson), Pailish, Chiltz, Clamoitomicks, Quinechart, Kilamox. Tribes noted: Ahaharopinopah (Crow band), Alabama, Atacapa, Biloxi, Blood, Cadoquies, Cahokia, Castapanas, Cataka (Haka, Catteka), Cattanahaw, Cherokee, Choctaw, Choketartowomb, Conchates, Creek, Dotames (Dotama, a Paduca group), Ehartsar (Crow band), Esahatenketarpar (Teton Sioux), Hahahartone (Yankton Sioux), Honetaparteen (Yankton, also Honetaparteenwas), Kaskaskia, Keenkesah (Mindawarcarton Sioux), Lalplay (group of Alitan-Snake), Mahtahton (Sioux), Manetopar (Assiniboine-Band lar Gru), Menesharne (Teton Sioux), Miahkeejocksah (Wahpocoota Sioux), Nacota Mahtopanarto (Assiniboine) and Nacota Oseegah, Natchez (Chitemacha), Nemousin (see also Kiowa, Staeton), Noota (Crow band), Otaharton (Wahpatone Sioux), Ozash (Teton Sioux), Pareescar (Crow), Peoria Sahonehontaparpar (Teton Sioux), Sahown (Teton Sioux), Sheo (Teton Sioux), Sosobubar and Sosona (Shoshoni tribe), Tackchandessechar (Sioux-Teton), Tarcoimboto (Yankton Sioux), Tarcoehparh (Teton), Tintahton (Mindawarcarton Sioux), Touincas, Wauneewackataonelar (Teton), Warchinktarhe (Teton), Wetapahatoes and Kiowa (branch of Padouca?), Zaartar (Yankton).Ethnographic materials include a list of natural history specimens sent on November 16, 1805, to the American Philosophical Society by Captain Lewis. 2 pages, copy of Lewis to Jefferson, March 5, 1805, Fort Mandan. Answers written at Fort Mandan to queries concerning Indian land ownership, trade, cultivation, mode of life, mode of taking game, mode of warfare, origins, burial customs, houses, superstitions, modes of punishment, trade, treatment of whites. Data arranged in tabular form with diary observations arranged in one column, 28 pages. Ledger entries comment on plants, giving Kickapoo and Chippewa plant names; 10 pages dated 1800. Ancient fortification on BonHomme Island, the original draft of which is to be found on reverse of Clark's estimate of the western Indians. Mentions Salteaux, Sioux, Mandan, Assiniboine, Oto, Maha, Ponca, Shivitans, Crows, Caneenawees, Shayehn. Printed, Quaife (1916a). See also Jackson (1962): 155-156 for further data. A list of the names of the different nations and tribes of Indians...expressive of the names, languages, numbers, trade, water courses. A large chart listing 72 tribes with parallel columns giving various data. On reverse side only tribes 1-52 are considered, as remainder are Louisiana tribes rather than Missouri and Rocky Mountain Indians. A draft of the "Statistical Estimate..." printed as part of Thomas Jefferson, Message of the President...(February 17, 1806): 9-47. Geographic materials include An account of location of tributaries of the Missouri above Fort Mandan prepared in 1805. This draft appears to antedate the fuller statement in Codex O: 117-128, and supplements the "Summary Statement of the Rivers and Creeks." A lengthy description and list of distances of tributaries of the Missouri from St. Charles to Fort Mandan; an earlier version of the formal statement in Codex O: 69-116 by Lewis. Early draft of Summary Statement of Rivers..."A Summary View of the Rivers and Creeks," pages 69-128; mentions old villages of Missouri and Kansas; recommends trading posts for Oto, Missouri, Poncaras, Panies (Proper, Republican, and Loups), Mahas, Yankton Ahnahs. Mentions Yankton, Sisseton, and Teton Sioux as well as Minnetarees, Mandans, and Ahwahharwas. Pages 116-128 based on Indian information; mentions Flatheads. Probably composed at Fort Mandan, 1804-1805. A translation extracted from journal of James MacKay describing trade route through Lake Superior to the Grand Portage; recording stay with Mandans, Manitouris, and Wattassons in 1797. Includes extract of journal of John Evans, 1796, who visited the Arikaras. Notes by John Hay and his "Description of the route from Mackinac to the Grand Portage," etc., taken by him in 1794.
Collection: Lewis and Clark Journals (Mss.917.3.L58)

Anishinaabe | Seneca | Haudenosaunee | Lenape | Shawnee | Wyandot | Miami | Ojibwe | Potawatomi | Odawa
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Odawa, Ojibwa, Ojibway
Language(s): English
Date: 1722-1801
Type:Text
Extent: 3 items
Description: Colonel John French and James Logan's 1722 report to the Pennsylvania Provincial Council about the murder of an Indian by traders John and Edmund Cartlidge during a drunken brawl, including depositions and Indians' demands for satisfaction. John Montresor's letter to Colonel James Montresor, regarding his meeting with the Senecas and meetings with other Native peoples in the Great Lakes region in fall of 1764, during Pontiac's War; his position made precarious by General Gage's desire to continue war; French aid to Indians. Pierce's 1801 journal of a visit to Cornplanter Reservation, including an account of Conediu (Handsome Lake) meetings with Indians, September 18-21. Conediu accuses Munsy of witchcraft on Cornplanter's daughter.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway
Language(s): English
Date: 1865-1871
Type:Text
Extent: 2 volumes, 655 p.
Description: The two surviving volumes of Trippe's journals document his ornithological and natural historical observations between 1865 and 1871, including meticulously detailed records of the avifauna (and to lesser degree other fauna) in central New Jersey, central Iowa, and southern Minnesota. They include detailed, and Trippe provided year-end taxonomic and meteorological indexes for 1869, 1870, and 1871. Includes brief mentiones of Chippewa Indians.
Collection: T. Martin Trippe Journals (Mss.598.2.T73)