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Lenape | Miami | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Lenape, Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1789; 1794
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Two letters of Moravian missionary John Gottlieb Ernestus Heckewelder concerning Native Americans. From originals in the Massachusetts Historical Society. A 4-page 1789 letter to an unknown recipient concerns the danger of surveying Moravian Indian lands on the Muskingum River due to threats from Indians, particularly Miamis, and mentions Zeisberger. A 2-page 1794 letter to Timothy Pickering contains information from David Zeisberger concerning Indian affairs; according to Zeisberger and [Gottlob] Senseman, Native peoples (especially Five Nations) at Thames River desire peace.
Collection: John Gottlieb Ernestus Heckewelder letters and papers, 1789-1796 (Mss.Film.805.2)

Haudenosaunee | Nanticoke | Shawnee | Lenape | Wyandot | Miami | Seneca
Alternate forms: Iroquois: Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1790-1976
Type:Text
Extent: 4 reels
Description: These papers include letters, reports, minutes, memoranda, and addresses to Indian chiefs, selected from the Pickering papers from the Massachusetts Historical Society and from the Essex Institute. Includes letters and documents pertaining to Pickering, Henry Knox, John Sergeant, Jasper Parrish and Samuel Kirkland; relates to New York and Western Indian affairs, principally Iroquois, but also Nanticoke, Shawano [Shawnee], Delaware, Wyandot, Miami, Seneca. Originals at the Massachusetts Historical Society (3 reels) and Essex Institute, Salem, Massachusetts (1 reel). See also Fenton (1953).
Collection: Papers, 1790-1796, on Indian affairs (Mss.Film.638 & 645)

Lenape | Haudenosaunee | Shawnee | Nanticoke | Mohawk | Seneca | Onondaga | Meskwaki | Mahican | Wyandot | Ojibwe | Miami | Kickapoo
Alternate forms: Lenape, Iroquois, Fox, Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1760
Type:Text
Extent: 1 reel
Description: Christian Frederick Post was a Moravian missionary and observer of Native peoples and cultures; he was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1768. This journal of Post's, who was in the company of fellow colonist John Hays and Delaware leader Teedyuscung (and also mentions Delawares Isaac Still and Moses Tattamy), relates to Post's mission as a representative of the Governor and Council of Pennsylvania to the Ohio Valley Indians and the conference held near the Ohio River in 1760. Copy in clerk's hand. Concerning message carried to Mingoes (or Mingos, who were Haudenosaunee, aka Six Nations Iroquois, in the Ohio Valley) and other Ohio Indians, return of colonists taken captive during the Seven Years' War, and other happenings on the journey. Includes description of conjuring ceremony. This is a microfilm of an original in possession of Mrs. Henry P. Gummere.
Collection: Journal, 1760, of the great council of the different Indian nations (Mss.Film.204)

Abenaki | Cherokee | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Dakota | Odawa | Ojibwe | Miami | Osage | Pawnee | Penobscot | Stockbridge-Munsee
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Sioux, Ottawa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Chippewa, Stockbridge, Wabanaki
Language(s): English
Date: 1817-1883
Type:Text
Extent: 64 reels
Description: These papers include letters, reports, accounts, and memoranda relating to the work of the American Board of Home Missions among the Abenaki, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Dakota, Ojibwa, Miami, Osage, Pawnee, Penobscot, and Stockbridge-Munsee peoples of Arkansas, New York, and Oregon. Originals in Houghton Library, Harvard University.
Collection: Papers,1817-1883, relating to North American Indian missions (Mss.Film.1223)

Tuscarora | Seneca | Dakota | Haudenosaunee | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Miami | Otomi | Powhatan | Mohawk | Natchez | San Felipe | Nottoway | Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Winnebago, Sioux, Keres
Language(s): English
Date: 1801-1843
Type:Text
Extent: 33 items
Description: Correspondence, largely from Peter S. du Ponceau to Albert Gallatin, regarding legal and political matters, Indian languages and linguistics, philological matters, and the American Philosophical Society. Specific topics include exchanges of publications and manuscripts between the two men; the creation of a map of Indian languages; the government's collecting of Indian vocabularies and du Ponceau's refusal to supply Historical and Literary Committee material to the government, believing that the committee rather than the government should undertake the collection and publication of Indian materials; methods of seeking data on languages, and the difficulties of sentence for testing problems of comparative Vocabularies;s both already published and in progess, such as Eliot's Grammar, Barton (1797), Pickering (1820), Hodgson on the Berber, Najera (1837), Zeisberger (1830), Gallatin (1836), Prichard (1813), several of du Ponceau's works, etc.; du Ponceau's acceptance of copies of Gallatin's Synopsis, with a jab at its Worcester (rather than APS) the fate of the manuscript for du Ponceau's prize essay: the printer bankrupt, difficulties in getting manuscript returned, and du Ponceau has no full copy; of du Ponceau's study of Chinese;s and the Transactions of the Historical and Literary Committee; du Ponceau's acceptance of vocabularies on behalf of the the state of European linguistics; Pickering's alphabet for Indian languages; Carib women's vs. men's the opposition founding of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, and du Ponceau's efforts to make peace by submitting his translation of Vater's Enquiry for them to publish; illnesses and deaths in du Ponceau's family; and du Ponceau's age, health, and failing eyesight. Other individuals mentioned include Franklin, Rush, Rittenhouse, Jefferson, Cass, Schoolcraft, Long, Ebeling, Adelung, Klaproth, Balbi, Humboldt, Volney, and Heckewelder. Originals at the New York Historical Society.
Collection: Peter Stephen Du Ponceau letters, 1801-1843, to Albert Gallatin (Mss.Film.541)