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Guarani | Quechua | Aymara | Maya
Date: 1936-1950
Description: The Guarani materials in the Lounsbury Papers can be found in multiple sections of the collection. In Series I, there is correspondence from Rahder, Rubin, and Tulchin. In Series II, in the "Other Languages and Cultures of the Americas" section, there are Lounsbury's notes, "Têtagüá Sapucài (Grito del Pueblo)," which accompany sound recordings. In the "South America" section of Series II, see Fieldnotes #5, under "Brazil," and "Terena and Guarani Wire Recordings Tables of Contents." In Series VII, there are two sets of digitized recordings, "Paraguayan Popular Music" and "Terena-Guarani." Of special interest among the audio is the "Story of the Guarani creator, Tupi, and the creation of the Guarani people" told by Pedro Coelho de Suza.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Chicomuceltec | Ch'ol | Lacandon | Maya | Tzeltal | Tzotzil
Alternate forms: Mayan
Date: 1924 and undated
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 4 pages, 1 map
Description: The Maya materials in the ACLS collection consist of two items in the "Maya" section of the finding aid. The first is a brief word list recorded by Edward Sapir containing terms for numerals, natural objects, animals, parts of the body; obtained from the "Mortiniano tribe." (The specific Mayan language the list reflects is currently unidentified.) The second item is a linguistic map of Chiapas by Rudolf Schiller form 1924, which includes locations of Lacandon, Chol, Tzotzil, "Tsoke," "Tzendal" (Tzeltal?), and Chicomuceltec.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Maya | Mixe | Zuni | Tzeltal | Bororo
Date: 1963-1995
Description: The Maya materials in the Lounsbury Papers are extensive. The correspondence in Series I includes a Motul (Mayan) dictionary, discussion about translating Maya glyphs and calendrical calculations, the Popol Vuh. Series II consists of articles and manuscripts from a project identified as "Maya kinship unfin. project." Much of this work is focused on interpreting Maya hieroglyphs. In Series VII there are a number of recordings of Yucatec Maya made in the 1960s focused on vocabulary. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a dictionary by Rene Acuna, Lloyd Anderson's Etymologies of Mayan calendrical and astronomical terms, Anthony Aveni's interpretation of Maya hieroglyphs, Brent Berlin's decipherment of Maya hieroglyphs, Gordon Brotherston's comments on FGL's manuscript on Maya dates, Lyle Campbell's bibliography of Mayan linguistics, Wallace Chafe on how FGL got into the study of Maya hieroglyphics, Michael Coe's report that Soviets were successful in using a computer to translate Maya hieroglyphs, R. David Drucker's comparison of Aztec and Maya calendars, Dieter Dutting on Maya hieroglyphs; transformational analysis of Yucatec.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Maya
Date: undated
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 4 folders
Description: Daythal Kendall annotated a copy of "Correspondencias Fonologicas Entre la Lenca y una Lengua Mayance" with Quechua and Takelma (Series 2). He also kept Essays from the American Anthropological Association (Series 7) and a one-page description of the Maya vigesimal numeral system.
Collection: Daythal L. Kendall Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.148)

Aztec | Huichol | Nahua | Tarahumara | Tepecano | Tepehuán | Tohono O'odham | Yaqui | Mayo | Akimel O'odham | Ute | Paiute | Hupa | Maya | Cora
Alternate forms: Cahita, Papago, Pima, Hiaki, Yoeme, Na:tini-xwe
Date: 1914-1962
Type:Text
Extent: 21 items
Description: Materials relating to John Alden Mason's interest and research in Uto-Aztecan languages and cultures. Items include notes and letters on Uto-Aztecan historical Mason's "Some initial phones and combinations in Utaztecan stems," an abstract and full text of a paper delivered at the Philadelphia meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1951); unattributed corresondence discussing that 1951 paper; Mason's correspondence with Edward Sapir regarding Mason's work on the Tepehuan, Papago [Tohono O'odham], Sonoran and Yaqui languages, Sapir's work on Paiute and Hupa, and mentioning Boas, Rivet, Speck, Spier, and Whorf; earlier correspondence with Sapir relaying Tepehuan, Tepecano, Papago [Tohono O'odham], and Nahua examples, data from Mason for Sapir's use in Uto-Aztecan comparative work, Sapir's comments on Mason's data and analysis, and Sapir's views on Uto-Aztecan historical Mason's corresondence with Ruth Benedict regarding work on Papago [Tohono O'odham], Pima, and Yaqui languages, an honorarium for Franz Boas, and Ruth Underhill's Papago Rites and ceremonies; correspondence with George Herzog regarding Tepehuan music and language, Pima-Papago language, and mentioning Franz Boas, Gene Weltfish, Edward Sapir, Ruth Underhill, Frank G. Speck, and others; correspondence with David H. Kelley regarding comparison of Polynesian and Uto-Aztecan languages (Kelly's dissertation); part of Kelley's Harvard University doctoral dissertation regarding the borrowing of Uto-Aztecan words into Polynesian; Benjamin Lee Whorf on Uto-Aztecan languages, including a table of relationships and a photo reproduction of Whorf's Azteco-Tanoan tree; correspondence with Whorf regarding Whorf's grant application to the Social Sciences Research Council to work on modern Nahuatl, and also touching on Uto-Aztecan phonology, Maya glyphs, Nahuatl, Papago [Tohono O'odham], Tepecano, Tepehuan, Yaqui, and subgrouping; and correspondence with Morris Swadesh regarding establishing an official Aztec alphabet, Swadesh's glotto-chronological work in Uto-Aztecan, disagreement between Mason and Swadesh over the number of stop series in Papago [Tohono O'odham], Swadesh's retraction (to be published in Word) of his criticisms of Mason's Papago [Tohono O'odham] grammar, and copies of letters from Swadesh to [Dean] Saxton and Andre Martinet. Undated linguistic materials include notes, Vocabularies, vocabularies, comparisons with notes about correspondences, comparative vocabularies, notes on numerical systems, cognates with English glosses, cognates with Spanish glosses, lexicostatistical compilations, etc. Languages represented (and not merely mentioned) include Huichol, El Nayar Cora, Nahuatl, Opata, Tarahumara, Tepecano, Tepehuan, Tohono O'odham, Tubar, Yaqui, and Mayo; it is unclear, however, which specific Tarahumara and Tepehuan languages are represented.
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Wintu | Klamath | Takelma | Maya | Patwin | Miwok
Date: 1888-1953
Description: The Wintu materials in the Harvey Pitkin Papers are extensive. Subcollection I, Series I, contains notes, notebooks, vocabularies, slip files, texts, manuscripts and phonetic tracings by Jeremiah Curtin in the late 19th century, Roland Dixon, and A.M. Halpern. Series I-B contains Pitkin's grammar slip files and vocabularies collected by Curtin. Series I-C includes Jaime de Angulo's manuscript on the Patwin lagnague, S.A. Barrett's transcritptions and translations of speech and song recordings, Radin's "Grammatical Sketch" and Waterman's notes on Patwin phonetics. Series II-A is rich in materials collected by A.L. Krober. In Subcollection II, Pitkin's field notes are located in Series 2, Subseries 1. Subseries 2 includes Pitkin's extensive notes on his Wintu dictionary, grammar, texts, stories, and music. The manuscript of the dictionary is located in Subseries 3. There is an unpublished 416 page manuscript of stories written in both English and Wintu, songs, and transcriptions in Subseries 4. This section also includes copies of all the extant linguistic material with works by noted linguists such as Curtin, Albert Gatschet, Radin, Halpern, Morris Swadesh, Victor Golla, and J.P. Harrington. Series 6 is comprised of card file slips with comparative analyses by Pitkin of the four languages of the Wintun family.
Collection: Harvey Pitkin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.78)