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Abenaki | Innu | Penobscot | Maliseet | Haudenosaunee | Wabanaki | Atikamekw
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Tete de Boule
Date: 1914-1930
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Abenaki materials in the Hallowell Papers are mostly located in Series V, Research Files, in folders labled "Abenaki" and Series VI, Photographs, Subseries E "St. Francis Abenaki Album." These include linguistic, ethnographic, ethnobotanical, ceremonial knowledge, information on political organization, and historical materials. Of particular interest are a sketch of Abenaki history from 1600-1930 accompanied by detailed notes from secondary sources on 17th century Abenaki history. The linguistic materials include an analysis of how the language changed after contact with Catholic missionaries, Abenaki vocabulary related to body parts, Abenaki phonetics, and religious, medical, and kinship terminology. The ethnobotanical materials include a manuscript labled "Identity of animals and plants," and information concerning herbal medicine and its practitioners. There is a wealth of ethnographic materials that include drawings of pipes, descriptions of games, baketry and birch bark maks. There is descriptions of Abenaki music and diagrams of dances, as well as detailed descriptions of hunting techniques. Some of the genealogical materials contains lists of community members names and descriptions of marriage. Interspered throughout the folders labled "Abenaki" in the Research Files are interlinear translations of stories such as "Man who could Find Lost Objects," "Woman and Bear Lover" and numerous other stories. The materials on hunting include topics such as the use of snow shoes, preparation of moose hide,and techniques and drawings of trapping. The collections contain important information designation hunting territories and family names. Four folders contain detailed informaiton on kinship terms. Two folders on Measurements and Genealogical data contain lists of names. The folders labled "Linguistics" in Series V contain scattered information about Abenaki grammar. In Series VI, of 160 photographs taken at St. Francis, Odanak in the Centre-du-Québec region. The Abenaki people in the photographs are identified, in most cases, and also include depictions of traditional dress, buildings, clothing, baskets, and a wide variety of material culture. The correspondence, in Series I, includes letters from Theophile Panadis; Gordon Day describing his collection of stories, recordings, vocabularies, and hunting territories. Henry Lorne Masta, one of Hallowell's Abenaki consultants, writes about culture and language. Additional correspondents may contain other Abenaki-related information.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Innu | Naskapi | Atikamekw | Wabanaki | Delaware | Algonquin | Mashpee | Passamaquoddy | Wampanoag | Mi'kmaq | Penobscot | Maliseet | Muscogee | Menominee
Alternate forms: Menomini, Têtes-de-Boules, Têtes de Boules, Tete de Boule
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1920-1940
Description: The materials from Algonquian speaking cultures is quite extensive, though scattered, in the A. Irving Hallowell Papers. One of the strengths is Hallowell's very fine black and white portraits of indigenous peoples located in Series VI, Subseries F, which includes images of Mashpee, Mohegan, Montagnais, Naskapi, Womponowag, Nipissing, Atikamekw, Series V contains some generalized materials such "Algoquian Cross Cousin Marriage," Speck's studies of northern Algoquian hunting territories, and Algonquin mythology and history. The folders entitled "Eastern Woodlands" in box 26 contain more culturally specific materials such as a Penobscot vocabulary list, Innu and Naswkapi material culture, and Delaware religions and ceremonies, although many of these are quite brief. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a letter from John Swanton discussing bear ceremonialism in Muscogee culture. George Herzog's correspondence includes Penobscot and Maliseet scores of war dance songs. There is also a letter from Jeffrey Zelitch, dated 1969, describing traditional ceremonies on the Lakota Rosebud reservation just before the American Indian Movement begins. George Spindler's lettter to describes a Medicine Lodge ceremony among the Menomini.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Maliseet | Passamaquoddy
Alternate forms: Malecite
Date: 1975-1978, 1995, 1998
Type:Text
Extent: 858 pages
Description: The Malecite-Passamaquoddy materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 6 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Campana, Knecht, LeSourd, Ng, and Smith.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Abenaki | Maliseet | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Malecite
Date: 1959
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (1 hr., 11 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Linguistic field recordings made at Woodstock Reserve, New Brunswick, Canada, in June 1959. A reading of Malecite words and their English equivalents for multiple varieties and groupings of animals and plants, fish, dwellings, canoes and other water craft, hunting & fishing, and numbers & measures. The final 6 minutes of the recording consist of a reading from from Joseph Laurent's "New Familiar Abenakis and English Dialogues" (St-Francis, Quebec, 1884). (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Malecite words pertaining to natural history (Mss.Rec.34)

Maliseet | Penobscot | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Malecite
Date: 1933
Type:Text
Extent: 50 pages
Description: The Maliseet materials in the ACLS collection consist of a single item in the "Malecite" section of the finding aid. Sapir and Swadesh's "Notes on Penobscot and Malecite" primarily consists of Penobscot, with additional Maliseet vocabulary. It contains a Penobscot alphabet, text, and carbon copy of texts from records with interlinear translations, and lexical items on slips. Recorded in part with speaker Mitchell Attean.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Maliseet | Penobscot
Alternate forms: Malecite
Language(s): English
Date: 1833-1893
Type:Text
Extent: 4 items
Description: Items relating to Maliseet culture and Malecite-Passamaquoddy language. These include John Howe's presentation of a set of porcupine table mats, made by the Indians of St. John, New Brunswick, to the Horatio Hale's letter to Henry Phillips concerning the proper title of his pamphlet [i.e., "Remarks on the language of the St. John's, or Wlastukweek Indians, with a Penobscot vocabulary" (1834)], words taken when Indians visited Cambridge, and faulty reference in Pilling's proof sheets; James Pilling's letter to Phillips seeking proper bibliographical entry for Hale (1834) pamphlet on Wlastukweek and the spelling of the name; and Phillips' "Concerning pamphlet on the language of the St. John's...Indians," about Hale (1834).
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Maliseet
Alternate forms: Malecite
Date: 1916-1949 (bulk 1916, 1945‐1948)
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: The Speck Maliseet materials include vocabulary lists, unpublished notes from Speck's work on hunting territories, a comparative analysis between Maliseet and Delaware conceptions of the Celestial Bear, and notes on Maliseet dance and songs. Of particular value is a map depicting Maliseet villages along the St. John's River. This material is found primarily in the “Malecite” section of Subcollection I, Series I, Research Material, with additional materials in correspondence series, photographs, and maps. Some Maliseet information may be located among Passamaquoddy, Penobscot, or other materials from the same region.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Maliseet | Penobscot
Alternate forms: Malecite
Date: 1907; 1914-1917; 1934-1935; 1971-1991
Type:Text
Genre: Grammars | Stories
Description: The Maliseet materials in the Siebert Papers consist primarily of secondary sources in Series IV and VII . Siebert's work can be found in Series V. Of special interest are a collection of Maliseet tales from 1914 collected by William Mechling.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Mi'kmaq | Passamaquoddy | Maliseet | Beothuk | Cherokee
Alternate forms: Micmac, Malecite
Language(s): English | Mi'kmaq
Date: 1909-1949
Type:Text
Extent: 8 folders
Description: Materials relating to Mi'kmaq history, language, and culture. Includes Speck's field notes on topics such as wampum, hunting territories, Cape Breton texts, Newfoundland traditions, the Passamaquoddy, etc., as well as a map with names of Bear River Band members and one piece of birch bark with pictographs inscribed; Speck's miscellaneous notes and correspondence on topics such as consultants, specimens, hieroglyphics, linguistics, fieldwork, Mi'kmaq and Cherokee, and the Mi'kmaq mission newspaper; a text on Mi'kmaq dance with interlinear translation, notes, and a musical score; 10 pages of linguistic notes and vocabulary collected along the Miramichi River, along with 6 pages of typed copy by John Witthoft; correspondence with Mechling concerning linguistic research on the Mi'kmaq, Malecite [Malecite-Passamaquoddy], and Oaxaca languages, Mi'kmaq burials, and historic materials on Beothuk and Mi'kmaq; a brief article on a traveler's account of the Mi'kmaq in 1822; an incomplete article or set of reading excerpts taken after 1922 by Speck from John G. Millais (1907); and extracts concerning the sweat house taken by Butler from the Jesuit Relations.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Passamaquoddy | Maliseet | Abenaki | Penobscot
Alternate forms: Malecite
Language(s): English
Date: 1898-1899
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Letters from John Dyneley Prince to the American Philosophical Society regarding his work on the Passamaquoddy. Prince requests copies of his article "Passamaquoddy Wampum Records" [see Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 36 (1897): pages 479-495]; acknowledges receipt thereof; and writes again regarding a paper on Passamaquoddy witchcraft tales, his article on Passamaquoddy wampum records, and his study of the language and traditions of the eastern Algic tribes, particularly Abenakis, Passamaquoddies, and Penobscots. Mentions Daniel G. Brinton.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)