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A'wa'etłala | K'ómoks | Da'naxda'xw | Dzawada'enuxw | Gopinuxw | Gusgimukw | Gwa'sala | Gwatsinuxw | Gwawa'enuxw | Kwakwaka'wakw | Kwagu'ł | Kwikwasutinuxw | Ławitsis | Ma'a̱mtagila | Mamalilikala | Nak'waxda'xw | Namgis | Tłatłasikwala | Wiwekam | Wiweqayi | Ndau | Zulu | Heiltsuk
Alternate forms: Gwasilla, Gwawaenuk, K'omoks, Koskimo, Kwakiutl, Kwicksutaineuk, Laich-kwil-tach, Lekwiltok, Nakoaktok, Nakwoktak, Nimpkish, Quatsino, Tanakteuk, Tlowitsis, Tsawataineuk, Weiwaikai, Weiwaikum
Date: 1893-1951
Extent: Approx. 10,000 loose pages, 10 notebooks, 7000+ cards, 10+ maps
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw materials in the ACLS collection are located predominantly in the "Kwakiutl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing of all materials (other relevant sections are "Northwest Coast", "Bella Bella (Heitsuk)", and item AfBnd.4 in "Non-American and non-linguistic material"). Some of the larger individual sets of materials listed within this section also have their own specific tables of contents (available upon request) detailing their often highly diverse contents. Overall, the vast majority of the material is made of of 1) manuscripts sent to Boas by George Hunt from the 1890s to the 1930s, frequently in both Kwak'wala and English, covering a very broad range of Kwakwaka'wakw history, culture, languages, customs, and traditions; and 2) field work materials recorded by Boas and Boas' own analyses of material sent by Hunt, covering a similar range of topics. Additional materials by other individuals focus especially on linguistic and ethnographic matters. Also see the "Kwakiutl materials, Franz Boas Papers," for information on the correspondence between Boas and Hunt, which gives additional context to the materials in the ACLS collection.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Kwakwaka'wakw
Alternate forms: Kwakiutl
Language(s): English
Date: 1893
Type:Text
Extent: 3 items
Description: Correspondence about Boas' Kwakiutl [Kwak'wala] vocabulary, from Brinton's approval of its printing, Boas' comments on the proof, and Williams' request for a copy after publication. See also Boas (1893).
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Kwakwaka'wakw
Alternate forms: Kwakiutl
Language(s): English
Date: 1934
Type:Text
Extent: 18 letters
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw material in the Boas-Rukeyser collection primarily consists of a series letters to and from Dan Cranmer written in 1934. These letters all been digitized and can be accessed via links the finding aid. Other correspondence files in this collection may contain some additional Kwakwaka'wakw-related content.
Collection: Boas-Rukeyser Collection (Mss.B.B61ru)

Kwakwaka'wakw
Alternate forms: Kwakiutl
Language(s): English | Kwak'wala
Date: circa 1947-1950 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 7 folders
Description: Several items relating to the Kwakwaka'wakw culture and Kwak'wala language have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. Voegelin and his contemporaries designated both the culture and language as "Kwakiutl," which is reflected in the finding aid. All "Kwakiutl" materials are located in Subcollection II. They include "Kwakiutl" material in correspondence with Morris Swadesh in Series I. Correspondence; a "Kwakiutl" folder in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries VIII. Undetermined Phylum Affiliation; a "Kwakiutl" folder and another folder containing reviews of Franz Boas' "Kwakiutl Grammar" (1948) in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries I: General works; a Kwakwaka'wakw story ("Cannibal-of-the-North-End-of-the-World") in the North Pacific Coast Tales category in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries II: American Indian Tales for Children; and Stanley S. Newman's review of Franz Boas' "Kwakiutl Grammar" and Florence M. Robinett's [i.e., F. M. Voegelin] "Tentative Kwakiutl Morpheme List, Based on Boas' Grammar in the Handbook of American Indian Languages." in Series IV. Works by Others.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

A'wa'etłala | K'ómoks | Da'naxda'xw | Dzawada'enuxw | Gopinuxw | Gusgimukw | Gwa'sala | Gwatsinuxw | Gwawa'enuxw | Kwakwaka'wakw | Kwagu'ł | Kwikwasutinuxw | Ławitsis | Lekwiltok | Ma'a̱mtagila | Mamalilikala | Nak'waxda'xw | Namgis | Tłatłasikwala | Wiwekam | Wiweqayi
Alternate forms: Gwasilla, Gwawaenuk, K'omoks, Koskimo, Kwakiutl, Kwicksutaineuk, Laich-kwil-tach, Nakoaktok, Nakwoktak, Nimpkish, Quatsino, Tanakteuk, Tlowitsis, Tsawataineuk, Weiwaikai, Weiwaikum
Language(s): English | German | Kwak'wala
Date: 1885-1942
Type:Text
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: This collection contains the bulk of correspondence between Franz Boas and his professional colleagues, though there are also other Boas collections in the library. The correspondents listed above contain some correspondence related to the culture or language listed in this entry. The largest correspondence is that of George Hunt, which took place from 1894-1933 and runs around 1000 pages. A full index for this correspondence is available upon request, and includes cross references to the locations (in other APS collections) of fieldwork and other materials referred to in the letters. Other correspondences primarily about Kwakwaka'wakw matters are that of the Cadwalladers, Dan Cranmer, John Fillmore (concerning the transcription of Boas' cylinder recordings of Kwakiutl songs), Alfred I. Hall, and C. J. Nowell. In the finding aid listings for some of these correspondents, the individual letters pertaining to this culture or language will be identified by a subject heading, though for some correspondents this indexing has not yet been completed. Some letters may contain only brief mentions of work being conducted in relation to the topic. Some additional correspondences in this collection that have not yet been indexed may also contain additional material.
Collection: Franz Boas Papers (Mss.B.B61)

Kwakwaka'wakw
Language(s): English | Kwak'wala
Date: 1962-1966, 1975, 1989-1990, 1994
Type:Text
Extent: 248 pages
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 4 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Amoss, Compton, and Rohner.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Navajo | Yuchi | Cherokee | Creek | Choctaw | Penobscot | Innu | Naskapi | Maliseet | Tunica | Chitimacha | Catawba | Inuit | Tsimshian | Seneca | Cayuga | Haudenosaunee | Cheyenne | Maya | Pueblo | Nanticoke | Catawba | Mi'kmaq | Quechua | Dakota | Chinook | Kwakwaka'wakw | Klamath | Pamunkey | Chickahominy | Rappahannock
Alternate forms: Montagnais-Naskapi, Eskimo, Iroquois, Malecite, Micmac, Sioux, Kwakiutl
Language(s): English | German
Date: 1904-1950
Type:Text
Extent: 46 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's research and other professional activities. Items include Speck's notes taken during graduate work at Columbia University under Franz Boas, and utilized for his own anthropology courses at the University of Pennsylvania; Speck's miscellaneous notes comprising circa 500 bibliographic cards and reading notes sorted out by tribe and/or language, dealing with tribes and countries in which Speck did no field work [other entries of this type are to be found among the various groups of materials in the Speck collection, according to tribe]; correspondence concerning exhibits and specimens for the Chicago World's Fair and for the Exposition of Indian Tribal Arts in New York City; two letters from Boas regarding the work of the Committee on Research in Native American Languages; correspondence regarding topics such as the double-curve motif, family hunting areas, indigenous foods and cooking methods, wampum, silverwork, birch-bark technique, baskets, Speck's research and publications, the research and publications of others, obtaining indigenous material cultural specimens for Speck, purchases of indigenous material culture specimens (baskets, masks, etc.) from Speck, Speck's identification of items in the Pitt Rivers Museum at Oxford University, Speck's bibliography, and Speck's obituary; letters requesting copies of Speck's publications, or acknowledging the transmission of publications between Speck and others; copies and/or drafts of several of Speck's presentations and publications, including "Lectures on Primitive Religion," "Land Ownership Among Hunting Peoples in Primitive America and the World's Marginal Areas," "Review of Lowie's Introduction to Cultural Anthropology," and "The Double-Curve Motive in Northeastern Algonquian Art"; a bibliography of Speck's publications through 1942; rough drafts of miscellaneous papers, 1928-1948; Speck's notes on topics such as crane posture; Birket-Smith's 1946 "Plan for Circumpolar Research"; ten distribution maps for circumpolar culture traits, colored in with crayon to show distribution of traits including divination and miracle shamanism, sweat bath, turtle Atlas myth and world-tree concept, bone divination, bear veneration, curative power of mystic words and formulae, dog-ancestor myth, dog as soul leader, curvilinear patterns, and confession to cure taboo violation; and a prepublication manuscript of Hallowell's "The nature and function of property as a human institution" with additions and corrections.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Ditidaht | Kwakwaka'wakw | Nuu-chah-nulth
Alternate forms: Nitinat, Nootka, Kwakiutl
Date: 1910-1952
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 75 pages; 47 slips
Description: The Wakashan materials in the ACLS collection consist of materials in the "Wakashan" section of the finding aid assembled by Sapir and Swadesh from earlier fieldwork materials. The materials in this section are all comparative vocabularies and analyses of mutiple Wakashan languages, primarily Nuu-chah-nulth, Kwak'wala, and Ditidaht. Distinction between these languages will be more apparent in the materials in themselves. See also the separate listings in this guide specifically for Ditidaht, Kwakwaka'wakw, and Nuu-chah-nulth materials.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Tsimshian | Nisga'a | Gitxsan | Kwakwaka'wakw
Alternate forms: Gitxaala, Kitasoo, Kwakiutl, Niska, Nisgah, Nishga, Gitksan
Language(s): Tsimshian | English
Date: 1933-1937; 1933-1969
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 Linear feet
Description: The William Beynon Papers include correspondence with Franz Boas regarding his work on Tsimshian narratives, Boas' collection of the tale of Dzagagilace in 1888 and 1900, Benyon's work on a series of Hartley Bay stories and the Halait manuscript, Benyon's proposed work with Gitxsan. Beyon's texts include his work with the Tsimshian collecting stories such as the arrival of the first white man, the myth of the house of Temks, subdivisions within the Tsimsyen, most all interlinear translations. The collection also includes two manuscripts previously collected by Henry W. Tate and a manuscript by Irving Goldman discussing Boas' ethographic work on the Kwakwaka'wakw.
Collection: William Beynon Papers (Mss.B.B467)