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Hupa | Wiyot | Karuk | Shasta | Achumawi | Atsugewi | Yana | Wintu | Maidu | Modoc | Tübatulabal | Yokuts
Alternate forms: Karok, Na:tini-xwe
Date: 1949-1952 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 5 folders
Description: Several items relating to the indigenous peoples and languages of the region now known as California have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. This entry is intended as a catch-all for items Voegelin himself grouped under the general heading of "California." Researchers should also view the entries for specific culture groups and languages. The various subseries devoted to Hokan, Penutian, and Uto-Aztecan languages in Subcollection II, Series II. Research Notes might also be of interest. The following "California" items are all located in Subcollection II. They include a comparative vocabulary of California tribes (with words from from Hupa, Wiyot, Karuk, Shasta, Achumawi, Atsugewi, Konkow [Northwest Maidu], Yana, Wintu, Maidu, and Modoc) in Subcollection II, Series II. Research Notes, Subseries V. Hokan. There are two items in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries IX. Uto-Aztecan, except Hopi: a folder on "Baja California" containing notes excerpting "Tribes and Languages of Baja California" by William C. Massey, vol 5, pp. 272-307 (1949), and a folder containing comparative charts of . There are two stories--"Coyote and the Women Hunters" (Tübatulabal) and "Measuring Worm Rescues Two Boys" (Yokuts)--in the California Indian Tales category in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries II: American Indian Tales for Children. Finally, there is a copy of Giuseppe Francescato's masters thesis "A Structural Comparison of the Californian Penutian" (1952) in Series IV. Works by Others.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Karuk
Alternate forms: Karok
Language(s): Karuk | English | Spanish
Date: 1949-2006
Extent: 4 linear feet
Description: From the age of 21 throughout his life, William Bright worked with Karuk speakers to document and revitalize their language, resulting in becoming the first white honorary member of the Karuk tribe. The most prominent materials at the American Philosophical Society as a result are wide-ranging audio recordings, from the 1950s until the 2000s (Series 6), especially with Violet Super. With Susan Gehr, he produced a Karuk language dictionary, correspondence with whom (Series 1) contains draft texts. With the Karuk he contributed considerably to the literature on Coyote in particular, original transcriptions of which are in notebooks in Series 3 Subseries 1, and further developments in Series 2. He also collected many small publications about Karuk, in the same series. Additionally of interest in Series 1 is correspondence about the suspected arson of a'tim'îin, the Karuk sacred site near Somes Bar, CA. Karuk materials can be found in every series.
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)