Current Filters
Click filter to remove
Displaying 1 - 10 of 16
Abenaki | Innu | Penobscot | Maliseet | Haudenosaunee | Wabanaki | Atikamekw
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Tete de Boule
Date: 1914-1930
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Abenaki materials in the Hallowell Papers are mostly located in Series V, Research Files, in folders labled "Abenaki" and Series VI, Photographs, Subseries E "St. Francis Abenaki Album." These include linguistic, ethnographic, ethnobotanical, ceremonial knowledge, information on political organization, and historical materials. Of particular interest are a sketch of Abenaki history from 1600-1930 accompanied by detailed notes from secondary sources on 17th century Abenaki history. The linguistic materials include an analysis of how the language changed after contact with Catholic missionaries, Abenaki vocabulary related to body parts, Abenaki phonetics, and religious, medical, and kinship terminology. The ethnobotanical materials include a manuscript labled "Identity of animals and plants," and information concerning herbal medicine and its practitioners. There is a wealth of ethnographic materials that include drawings of pipes, descriptions of games, baketry and birch bark maks. There is descriptions of Abenaki music and diagrams of dances, as well as detailed descriptions of hunting techniques. Some of the genealogical materials contains lists of community members names and descriptions of marriage. Interspered throughout the folders labled "Abenaki" in the Research Files are interlinear translations of stories such as "Man who could Find Lost Objects," "Woman and Bear Lover" and numerous other stories. The materials on hunting include topics such as the use of snow shoes, preparation of moose hide,and techniques and drawings of trapping. The collections contain important information designation hunting territories and family names. Four folders contain detailed informaiton on kinship terms. Two folders on Measurements and Genealogical data contain lists of names. The folders labled "Linguistics" in Series V contain scattered information about Abenaki grammar. In Series VI, of 160 photographs taken at St. Francis, Odanak in the Centre-du-Québec region. The Abenaki people in the photographs are identified, in most cases, and also include depictions of traditional dress, buildings, clothing, baskets, and a wide variety of material culture. The correspondence, in Series I, includes letters from Theophile Panadis; Gordon Day describing his collection of stories, recordings, vocabularies, and hunting territories. Henry Lorne Masta, one of Hallowell's Abenaki consultants, writes about culture and language. Additional correspondents may contain other Abenaki-related information.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Abenaki | Innu | Penobscot | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Montagnais
Date: 1914-1947 and undated
Extent: 5 items
Description: Materials relating to Abenaki languages and culture. Includes notes on a St. Francis Abenaki [Western Abenaki] conjuring lodge; miscellaneous notes about the St. Francis Abenaki including two cards of reading notes, a typed copy of an Indian poem in English from John Reade (1887), a letter from Frederick S. Dickson regarding Abenaki vocabulary, a letter from Edwin Tappan Adney concerning place names and Maine Indian shamans, and a photomechanical print of Montagnais [aka Innu] in camp; Wawenock [or Wawanoc, Eastern Abenaki] texts taken from Neptune, with interlinear translations [See also Speck (1928b).]; miscellaneous Wawenock notes on vocabulary, folklore, and population, along with a letter from J. P. Ranger about canoes, and three letters from W. C. Kendall, owner of Camp Wawenock, Lake Sebago, Maine, with information about Wawenock and his memories of Wawenock and Penobscot Indians of Maine; and a letter from Gordon M. Day seeking a bibliography and Speck's help in learning Abenaki.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Innu
Alternate forms: Montagnais
Language(s): English | Innu-aimun
Date: circa 1822
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume
Description: This volume of Champlain's "Voyages de la Nouvelle France" contains Albert Gallatin's marginalia. Gallatin's notes are in the section on Native Americans. Includes one page of remarks on Canadian Indians, and a one-page list of words of Montagnais [Innu] language.
Collection: Albert Gallatin Marginalia (Mss.917.1.C35)

Innu | Naskapi | Atikamekw | Wabanaki | Lenape | Algonquin | Mashpee | Passamaquoddy | Wampanoag | Mi'kmaq | Penobscot | Maliseet | Muscogee | Menominee
Alternate forms: Menomini, Têtes-de-Boules, Têtes de Boules, Tete de Boule
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1920-1940
Description: The materials from Algonquian speaking cultures is quite extensive, though scattered, in the A. Irving Hallowell Papers. One of the strengths is Hallowell's very fine black and white portraits of indigenous peoples located in Series VI, Subseries F, which includes images of Mashpee, Mohegan, Montagnais, Naskapi, Womponowag, Nipissing, Atikamekw, Series V contains some generalized materials such "Algoquian Cross Cousin Marriage," Speck's studies of northern Algoquian hunting territories, and Algonquin mythology and history. The folders entitled "Eastern Woodlands" in box 26 contain more culturally specific materials such as a Penobscot vocabulary list, Innu and Naswkapi material culture, and Delaware religions and ceremonies, although many of these are quite brief. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a letter from John Swanton discussing bear ceremonialism in Muscogee culture. George Herzog's correspondence includes Penobscot and Maliseet scores of war dance songs. There is also a letter from Jeffrey Zelitch, dated 1969, describing traditional ceremonies on the Lakota Rosebud reservation just before the American Indian Movement begins. George Spindler's lettter to describes a Medicine Lodge ceremony among the Menomini.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Catawba | Houma | Pamunkey | Cheraw | Yuchi | Cherokee | Innu | Naskapi | Dakota | Wateree | Creek | Shawnee | Haudenosaunee | Tutelo | Powhatan
Alternate forms: Montagnais-Naskapi, Sioux, Iroquois
Language(s): English | Catawba
Date: 1914-1947
Type:Text
Extent: 21 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Catawba history, language, and culture. This includes Speck's correspondence with indigenous consultants such as Red Thunder Cloud, Chief Sam Blue, and Leola Blue (Catawba) and Will West Long and Climbing Bear (Cherokee); correspondence with other anthropologists and linguists, such as John Reed Swanton, William N. Fenton, Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, C.F. Voegelin, Morris Swadesh, A. I. Hallowell, Mary Haas, and others; genealogies of twentieth-century Catawba consultants; a Catawba bibliography; notes on topics including Catawba division of time, travel and expedition, food resources, racial status in the South, and notes, possibly for a lecture, titled "The Catawba-A Small Nation Deflated"; a University of Pennsylvania student's essay on Catawba tribal correspondence with J. Walter Fewkes about Speck's Catawba field trips; field notebooks devoted to ethnologic notes, vocabulary, texts, songs, and other linguistic and cultural data; and collections of notes devoted to Catawba language and texts, general ethnological notes, and miscellaneous notes. Some of the notes and notebooks and much of the correspondence mentions other indigenous groups as well.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Cree | Innu | Naskapi
Alternate forms: Montagnais, Nehiyaw
Language(s): English | Cree | Innu-aimun
Date: 1911-1931, 1936, 1938-1948
Extent: 6+ folders; 60+ photographs; 1 film
Description: The Cree material in the Frank Speck papers are scattered around multiple sections of the finding aid, mostly in Subcollection I, Series I. In this series, see item II(2A5), containing correspondence from P.G. Downes to Speck regarding Cree in Quebec. See item II(2F3), which includes notes from A. irving Hallowell to Speck regarding field work visiting Sweet Grass Cree, mentioning attitude of Cree to Leonard Bloomfield. Item II(4B9c) contains Speck's field notes on the Mistassini band, including notes on relationship between Cree and Montagnais languages, as well as museum specimens. Item II(2G1) includes Naskapi names in Cree syllabary; the Lord's Prayer in Cree; miscellaneous syllabary Cree words, and images of 79 pictographs. In Subcollection I, Series II, see correspondence with Claude Schaeffer regarding Rocky Boy Cree, and correspondence with Paul A. W. Wallace regarding Cree tales (Wissakutchek) collected by Edward Ahenakew in Alberta. In Subcollection I, Series III, there are 4 "Cree" photograph folders containing approximately 60 photographs. See also "Naskapi films," located in Subcollection II, Series IV, Photographs and Video, which includes some footage of some Cree people.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Innu | Naskapi
Alternate forms: Montagnais
Language(s): English
Date: 1919
Extent: 30+ photographs
Description: The Innu materials in the Hallowell Papers include 30+ photographs in Series VI, Subseries D, from Lac St-Jean (Mashteuiatsh) and unidentified Naskapi communities.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Innu | Naskapi
Alternate forms: Montagnais, Montagnais-Naskapi
Language(s): English | Innu-aimun | Naskapi
Date: 1910s-1940s
Extent: 1.5 linear feet; 500+ photographs; 10+ maps; 1 film
Description: The Innu and Naskapi materials in the Frank Speck Papers are extensive and found to some degree in most sectionsn of the finding aid. The majority of these materials are identified by Speck as "Montagnais-Naskapi," though they include materials relating to Innu peoples from throughout Québec and Labrador, particularly the communities in the area of Lac St-Jean (Mashteuiatsh; usually given as "Lake St. John" by Speck), St-Augustin (usually "St. Augustine" in Speck); and Naskapi communities in northern and central Labrador. The main body of field work manuscript material is found in Subcollection I, Series II, especially items II(3B1a) through II(4B13). In Series III and IV, there are approximately 500-600 photographs and lantern slides from these communities. Series V contains approximately 12 maps pertaining to Speck's research into hunting territories and place names. In Subcollection II, Series I, see correspondence from Beston, Cooper, Gusinde, Myers, Sapir, and especially the voluminous correspondence with Richard White, a trader in Labrador who provided Speck with extensive information on the Naskapi peoples of the region for decades. In Series II, there are numerous works by Speck, including draft versions of "Naskapi, the Savage Hunters of the Labrador Peninsula." Finally, in Series IV, there is a brief silent film consisting of footage taken of various Innu peoples, including Joseph Kurtness, doing various activities, such as skinning and preparing hides, and singing.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Innu
Alternate forms: Montagnais
Language(s): English | Innu-aimun | French
Date: 1925-1937; 1982
Type:Text
Description: The Innu materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are predominantly linguistic materials, with one story and ethnographic study. Original notes by Siebert can be found in Series V: Notebooks, under notebooks labelled "Lake St. John" and "Scribble-in Book." Secondary sources, which use the term "Montagnais," can be found in Series IV and VII
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Innu | Naskapi
Alternate forms: Montagnais
Language(s): English | French | Naskapi | Innu-aimun
Date: circa 1690-1774
Type:Text
Extent: 3 items
Description: Part of a collection comprised of religious and linguistic materials in various Native American languages. Many were written by Jesuit missionaries of New France. These particular items include a copy of a Montagnais dictionary attributed to Father Bonaventura Faber (or Favre) circa 1690; Montagnais prayers attributed to Father Pierre-Michel (or Petro) Laure, containing also a fragment of a letter dated 1724 noting "this is the third year that I live with the Tad8ssaciens," and denouncing the honesty and truthfulness of the Indians; and a register of baptisms, marriages, and deaths at La Mission du Domain du Roy from 1759 to 1774. Native peoples mentioned in the latter include Chicoutimi, Tadussaks, Mille Vaches, and Montagnais. Originals in the Archives de l'Archiveche de Quebec, Bibliotheque de l'Archeveche de Quebec, and Universite Laval, Seminaire de Quebec.
Collection: Selected materials, 1676-1930, on Indian linguistics (Mss.Film.453)