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Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Winnebago
Language(s): English
Date: 1839
Type:Text
Extent: 2 folders
Description: In total, the Kane Family Papers consist of 56 linear feet of letters, legal papers, financial records, etc. of three generations of the prominent Philadelphia family. There are two folders, "Brodhead, D.M. Indian Material," #1 and #2 (1839), in Series II. Kane Family Legal Papers, which contain Philadelphia lawyer Daniel M. Brodhead's handwritten manuscript correspondence and other writings on legal issues pertaining to a recent treaty, treaty rights, land claims, removal, etc. facing the Ho-Chunk (whom he called Winnebago) people in Wisconsin, including a report to Secretary of War Joel R. Poinsett, ad a long letter from Indian agent Joseph M. Street. There is also a letter from C. A. Rogers to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs accusing Brodhead of siphoning treaty money to the comissioners. [See Linda M. Waggoner, "'Neither White Man Nor Indian': Affidavits from the Winnebago Mixed Blood Claim Commissions, Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin," for an interpretation of Brodhead's activities as nefarious).
Collection: Kane Family Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.115)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe | Potawatomi | Ho-Chunk | Meskwaki | Dakota | Menominee | Stockbridge-Munsee | Oneida | Iowa
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Chippewa, Winnebago, Sac, Sauk, Fox, Sioux, Chiwere, Ioway
Language(s): English
Date: 1835-1838
Type:Text
Extent: 4 items
Description: Letters discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains and observations of contemporary Native people. Houghton has been among Winnebago, Sacs, Foxes, and Sioux; can get Pottawatomi, Winnebago, and Chippewa skulls, but to get to know personages may take longer; Pitcher is sending sketch to go with a skull. Dr. Wheaton, evidently an army surgeon, spent 1822-1827 at Sault Ste. Marie, then at Mackinaw and Green Bay; consumption infrequent among soldiers, French residents, and Indians, which he attributes to the dry cold climate there; recommends such as treatment for sufferers. Pitcher resigned his Army job for private practice and to assist in forming the medical department of the new University of Michigan. He will send Chippewa skulls to help Morton "build up something like an American Golgotha." Schoolcraft advises Morton to come to Mackinac for treaty payments, where he can see Indians, and suggests a route he can take west to see more Indians. Mentions Chippewa, Menominee, Winnebagos, Stockbridge (Mohegan), Brothertowns, Oneidas, Sioux, Iowa, Sac and Fox Indians.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)