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Cayuga | Tuscarora | Mohawk | Onondaga | Seneca | Haudenosaunee | Lenape | Nanticoke
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English | Cayuga
Date: 1914-1947
Type:Text
Extent: 10 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Cayuga history, language, and culture. This includes Speck's correspondence with indigenous consultants such as Deskaheh and Alexander General (who became known as Deskaheh after the other's death in 1925) on topics such as museum specimens, games, religion, politics, land claims, stories, etc.; correspondence with other anthropologists such as Ernest Dodge about Cayuga war medicine [see also Speck and Dodge (1945)] and William N. Fenton concerning Cayuga winter rituals and suggestions for Speck's Cayuga manuscripts [see also Speck (1945b)]; and a notebook of Cayuga material containing ethnographic data and mentioning consultants John L. Buck, Mrs. John L. Buck, and Jerry Aaron as well as Deskaheh.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Haudenosaunee | Mohawk
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Six Nations
Language(s): English | Mohawk
Date: 1885
Contributor: Newhouse, Seth
Type:Text
Genre: Stories
Extent: 1 volume, 302 pages
Description: Copy of original, formerly in possession of Ray Fadden, St. Regis Mohawk Reservation, Hogansburg, New York, now in possession of Mohawk tribe. Includes story of Dekanawidah, lists of chiefs, ceremonial chants (including Condolence Council), constitution and its acceptance (pages 1-200), version of same in Mohawk with interlinear translation, names of principal families, and incomplete "aboriginal dictionary." Marginal notes by William N. Fenton. Fully described in Fenton (1949).
Collection: Cosmology of De-ka-na-wi-da's government of the Iroquois confederacy, 1885 (Mss.970.3.Ir6)

Lenape | Shawnee | Haudenosaunee | Odawa | Miami | Illinois
Alternate forms: Lenape, Iroquois, Odawa
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1730-1990, bulk 1947-1956
Type:Text
Extent: 44 folders, 1 box
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history. Though further research might yield more results, approximately 44 folders and one box of materials directly pertaining to the Delaware (also known as Lenape and Munsee) have been identified. Most of these items pertain to Wallace's personal research interest in the Delaware--beginning during his graduate studies, which led to the publication of "King of the Delawares: Teedyuscung, Delaware chief, 1700-1763" (1949), a psychoanalytic ethnohistory based on his masters thesis--and to his work as an expert witness for Native American land claims in the 1950s. There is one box containing research notecards on primary and secondary sources in Series III. Notecards. There are eight folders of notes, drafts, and other materials on Teedyscung, religion and revitalization, women, land, political organization, and other topics in Series IV. Works by Wallace A. Professional. There are two folders on "The Forbidden Path: Teedyuscung's Embassy to the Western Indians in 1760" by William A. Hunter and John Witthoft in Series V. Works by Others. Series IX. Indian Claims contains dockets, articles, notes, tribal histories, reports, etc., relating to Wallace's work as an expert witness for Delaware land claims (and the related land claims of other groups, such as the "Ohio Tribes," and Iroquois, or Haudenosaunee). There are also two folders of materials on the Lenape by Wallace's student Marshall Joseph Becker in Series II. Research Notes and Drafts B. Revitalization and Culture, as well as a folder of correspondence with Becker in Series I. Correspondence. Other relevant correspondence files include those of the American National Biography, Carl Bridenbaugh, Dwight Lewis Chamberlain, Loren C. Eiseley, the Eleutherian Mills--Hagley Foundation, Herbert Goltz, Jennifer King Hodges, William A. Hunter, Ruthe Blalock Jones, Mrs. Samuel P. Kelly, Harry B. Kelsey, Jean Laub, Franklin O. Loveland, Joan Lowe, Arthur Meyes, Russell Moses, Elizabeth Pilant, Claude E. Schaefer, Frank Speck, John Tabor, University of Pennsylvania Press, C. A. Weslager, and David Wyubeek. Finally, there is a folder of material on the history of the Munsee Recitation Festival (from originals in the Buffalo Historical Society and attributed to a Delaware resident of the Six Nations reserve in Canada, Albert Shequaqknind Anthony) in Series II. Research Notes and Drafts A. Indian Research. Note that there is also considerable Delaware material filed under "Ohio Tribes," particularly in land claims cases, and researchers should view the Ohio entry as well. See the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's long and varied career, and for an itemized list of the collection's contents.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)

Haudenosaunee | Mohawk | Seneca | Tuscarora | Onondaga | Oneida | Cayuga
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1984
Type:Text
Extent: 292 pages
Description: This dissertation was submitted to the anthropology department of Brown University by Christina Barbara Johannsen (later Hanks) in 1984. The author was also the founding director (and later on the Board of Directors) of the Schoharie Museum of the Iroquois Indian and a trustee of the Mohawk Caughnawaga Museum. The dissertation is based on fieldwork with Haudenosaunee artists and craftspeople and in museum collections. The author attempted to draw from Haudenosaunee communities through the United States and Canada to show how modern Haudenosaunee art has become "a means of maintaining and expressing a sense of Iroquois identity in a non-Iroquois world," and that the 1970s were in particular a moment of efflorescence as the People of the Longhouse asserted their identity through political activism and art.
Collection: Efflorescence and identity in Iroquois arts (Mss.970.6.J57e)

Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1815-1945
Type:Text
Extent: 25 items
Description: Various materials relating to Haudenosaunee people, culture, history, and language. Correspondence includes a typed copy of a 1815 letter from Haudenosaunee chiefs to the Secretary of War listing losses in the War of 1812; Daniel Webster thanking Parker for a gift copy of Morgan's "League of the Iroquois"; letters pertaining to Parker's assistance to both fiction and non-fiction writers such as Lewis Henry Morgan, Anna C. Campbell, Alfred B. Street, Charles Talbot Porter, etc.; William Cornwall's suggestion that the Haudenosaunee still own the Thousand Islands on the Canadian side of the border; letters pertaining to the New York Indians in Kansas Territory prosecuting claims under treaties of 1838 and 1842; Parker to B.F. Hall regarding "traditional history" of Chief Logan [see also #557]; and Parker to the President of the United States requesting that Peter Wilson be continued as interpreter for the New York Indian agency. Other items include a fragment of Ely Parker's "History of the government, manners, customs...(of the Iroquois Confederacy)"; his mutilated manuscript describing "a Grand Council of the Six Nations of New York, held at Tonawanda for the purpose of hearing again their religious code, from Jimmy Johnson, the Grand High Priest of the Iroquois Confederacy"; his "Initiation of the Wolf tribe of the Cayuga nation, one of the confederate nations of the Grand Confederacy of Iroquois"; other notes, extracts, and short essays by Ely Parker on Haudenosaunee-related topics; Caroline Parker's school essay on Handsome Lake; three chapters of Arther Caswell Parker's unpublished manuscript, "Red Embers of the Longhouse"; Asher Wright's memo book on the Council of the Six Nations held at Cattaraugus (December 1, 1862); Edward Ehlers' address suggesting similarities between Iroquois Longhouse and Masonic Lodge symbolism; and Peter Wilson's talk on Haudenosaunee history before the New York Historical Society.
Collection: Ely Samuel Parker Papers (Mss.497.3.P223)

Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1789; 1848; 1917; 1939-1994
Type:Text
Description: The Haudenosaunee materials in the Snyderman Papers include folders labelled by author in Series I from William Fenton, Alexander General, Helen Harris, and Frank Speck, which contain correspondence concerning wampum belts in museum collections and related topics. In Series II there is a deed from 1796, an article about Condolence Ceremonies, and Six Nations Council Minutes from 1848. See also the separate entries in this guide for Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, and Seneca materials in the Snyderman Papers.
Collection: George S. Snyderman Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.51)

Haudenosaunee | Mohawk | Seneca | Tuscarora | Lenape | Oneida
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1936-1967
Extent: 39 items
Description: Materials relating to Paul A. W. Wallace's interest in Haudenosaunee people, history, and culture. Of particular interest will be Wallace's correspondence and interviews with Haudenosaunee individuals. This includes Wallace's extensive correspondence with Ray Fadden (Tehanetorens, Aren Akweks) on subjects such as publications, the Six Nations, the Akwesasne Mohawks, personal matters, etc., as well as a woodcut by John Fadden (Kahionhes) titled "The persecuted Iroquois"; Ray Fadden's "The Visions of Handsome Lake," an interpretation of Ray Fadden's wampum belt (with two drawings by John Fadden); and Ray Fadden's (Aren Akweks, Tehanetorens) "Iroquois Lesson Book-Stories for good children and bad." Interview materials include a Six Nations Journal, containing notes on interviews with Nick Peters, Chief Joseph Montour, John Napoleon Brinton Hewitt, Isaiah Williams, Chief Hess, Chief William Loft, Alec General, and Jerry Aaron; notes, manuscripts, and interviews with William Dewaseragech Loft relating to the Six Nations and to Wallace's preparation of an entry on Loft for the Dictionary of Canadian Biography; and a transcript of a talk on Haudenosaunee cosmogony and history of relations with white people attributed to the Seneca chief Cornplanter and taken from a document (circa 1822) in the Draper Collection at Princeton University. Other Native correspondents and consultants include Jesse J. Cornplanter regarding the purchase of drawings, along with five of Cornplanter's drawings: "Two Friends," "Mortise," and three untitled; Alexander J. General (Deskaheh) regarding copies of Wallace's White Roots of Peace, the identity of a Mohawk chief, the meaning of some names, and Wallace's trip for the Seventh Annual Pageant at Ohnedagowah; E. T. Montour regarding the Handsome Lake religion; Ethel Brant Montour regarding the Six Nations and the Brant and Montour families; Donald Richmond regarding copying the Seth Newhouse version of Deganawidah sent to the St. Regis Mohawks; Allan Wargon regarding the film "The Longhouse People"; M. J. Jamieson regarding attendance by Wallace at the Condolence to the Dead and the Great Feast for the Dead; Arthur Einhorn (Skaroniate) regarding copies of publications, misinformation about the Iroquois, and plans for building an "Indian village"; Emily General regarding possible genealogical studies of chiefs of the Six Nations, the annual pageant at Ohnedagowah, and vital statistics of Deskaheh (Hi-wyi-iss, Levi General); Bernice Minton Loft Winslow (Dawendine) regarding the Six Nations, the health of her father Chief William Loft (Mohawk), publications, her poetry; Mad Bear regarding a parcel of land in Philadelphia reportedly owned by the and Robert Gabor (Sagotaoala) regarding Gabor's interest in and research on the effects of the adoption complex on the Iroquois Confederacy, his art work for Ray Fadden, circumstances under which the Delawares entered the League, etc. There is also correspondence between Wallace and other non-Native researchers including Charles E. Congdon regarding arrangements for conferences on Iroquoian studies; James T. Edward regarding a biographical sketch of Madam Montour for Notable American Women, 1607-1950; Peter Schuyler Miller regarding the Deganawidah legend; Arthur Caswell Parker regarding the Six Nations and Conrad Weiser; Harvey Chalmers regarding Heckewelder's prejudice against the Six Nations and its effect on Cooper, and prejudice aroused by Cooper's novels; Howard F. Comrie regarding the Iroquois Confederacy as an inspiration for the Constitution and Bill of Rights; Harry C. Durston regarding the date and place of the founding of the Five Nations Confederacy and possible influences of the Six Nations on the United States Constitution; John F. Freeman regarding Ray Fadden and the Akwesasne Mohawk Counsellor Organization and mentioning Seth Newhouse, Bernice Loft, and Edward Ahenakew; Marion E. Gridley regarding The Amerindian: American Indian Review, a picture of Maria Tallchief, and role of the Delawares, Tuscaroras, and Oneidas in the American Revolution; Alfred K. Guthe regarding old photos of Iroquois costumes in the Rochester Museum of Arts and Sciences; John Serres regarding the dedication of an Iroquois monument at Scarboro, Ontario and attempts to preserve Native culture; William N. Fenton regarding the Six Nations, different versions of the Deganawidah legend, meanings of Indian names, archaeological work in the area to be flooded by the Kinzua Dam, political history of the Iroquois, Seth Newhouse, publications, research, fieldwork, etc.; an essay by Fenton on published and manuscript sources relating to the history of political institutions and laws of the Six Nations, particularly with regard to ethnological sources, procedural methods to reach the desired goal, and expected results (published in Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 93 (1949): pages 233-238); and William A. Ritchie regarding a meeting at the American Philosophical Society, Indian trails in the Delaware Valley, and the probable date of the founding of the Five Nations Confederacy. Finally, there are Wallace's own notes, drafts, essays, etc., including notes for and a draft of "The Iroquois-A Brief Outline of their History" and "Return of Hiawatha," on the reasons for Iroquois ascendancy.
Collection: Paul A. W. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64b)

Haudenosaunee | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1845-1881
Type:Text
Extent: 2 reels
Description: Materials of ethnologist and anthropologist Lewis Henry Morgan. Reel 1: Lorimer Fison and Alfred W. Howitt to Morgan, 1865-1881, 455 pages. Materials pertaining to geology, etc., 194 pages. Materials pertaining to Morgan's secret society, Grand Council of the Iroquois, by Morgan, 156 pages, by others, 105 pages. Rules, Constitutions, etc., 44 pages. Volume 1 of Morgan manuscript journals, 394 pages. Reel 2: Volumes 2-6 of Morgan manuscript journals, 453, 532, 385, 456, and 552 pages. The journal includes notes on travels to New York and Michigan, conversations, and Indian councils. Record of Indian letters [i.e., Record of the inquiry concerning the Indian system of relationship...], volume 1, letters sent, 230 pages; volume 2, letters received, 279 pages. (Includes related correspondence). Printed table of contents (1936). [See also, for descriptive contents, Rochester Historical Society Publication Fund Series 2: 83-97; and White (1959).] Originals in the Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester.
Collection: Lewis Henry Morgan journal and correspondence, 1845-1876 (Mss.Film.582)

Mohawk | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1933-1948
Type:Text
Extent: 6 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Mohawk language, history, and culture. Includes miscellaneous Mohawk field notes on topics such as Caughnawaga traps, St. Regis mask data obtained from Julius Cook, dance, addresses, etc., as well as a letter from Ray Fadden congratulating Speck on his Iroquois study (1945); Speck's review of "Listen for a Lonesome Drum" by Carl Cramer; a brief (circa 1945) by St. Regis Mohawks concerning Indian rights against New York and federal government after 1924, along with a letter from Muzzy Cook, Julius Cook, and Ray Fadden (Aren Akweks, Tehanetorens, of the Akwesasne Counselor Organization); a letter from former student Mary Rowell (married name Carse) regarding her summer experiences among the St. Regis Mohawk, including her general impressions of the culture and her concern about the dangers of false traditions being taught; a letter from Margaret Lazore concerning the sale of baskets at the Allentown Fair and mentioning the visit of Mary Rowell (Carse) and Ray Fadden; and two letters from Louis C. Jones returning Speck's manuscript "the Mohawk Folk Tale" and relating to Speck serving on the Handbook Committee of the American Folklore Society.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Nanticoke | Haudenosaunee | Lenape | Cayuga | Tuscarora | Mohawk | Seneca | Onondaga | Oneida
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape
Language(s): English | Nanticoke
Date: 1914-1943
Type:Text
Extent: 3 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Nanticoke language, history, and culture. Includes Speck's miscellaneous Nanticoke notes, comprising a letter from Wes (?) to Speck, June 24, 1943, concerning Nanticoke J. Barton Cheyney to Speck, October 31, no year, concerning Delaware-white-Nanticoke relations; James Mooney to Speck, February 15, 1916, concerning Speck's Nanticoke article (1915); Franz Boas to Speck, March 29, 1916, on same subject. [See also Speck (1915).] Other materials include a document describing a meeting of Delaware, Nanticoke, and Canadian Iroquois in the presence of Speck and recounting injustices suffered by Native peoples in the United States and Canada [see also #1755] and Speck's notes on the Tuscarora in Canada, which include names for the Nanticokes in Cayuga, Tuscarora, Mohawk, Seneca, Onondaga, and Oneida; notes on wampum, folklore, and the Canadian Tuscarora; and some Nanticoke vocabulary.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)