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Caddo | Lenape | Choctaw | Chickasaw | Osage | Pascagoula | Natchez
Language(s): English
Date: 1804
Type:Text
Extent: 107 pages
Description: "Journal up the Red and Washita rivers, with William Dunbar, by order of the U.S. with list of common names of some of the trees and vegetables from the River Washita." No. 2 of Explorations in the Louisiana Country. Describes mounds near Natchez and on the Ouachita. Mentions Caddo trace; Captain Jacobs, a Delaware Indian; Chickasaws, Choctaws, Osages (Little Osages and Grand Osages) and Pascagoulas; warfare and raids; and the singing of a Choctaw woman mourning a child. Printed (abstract only) as Jefferson (1806). [See also Hunter journals #473, volumes 2, 3, 4, May 27, 1804-March 29, 1805.]
Collection: Mémoire sur le district du Ouachita dans la province de la Louisianne, [1803] (Mss.917.6.Ex7)

Natchez | Choctaw | Chickasaw | Yuchi | Lenape | Cherokee | Creek | Osage
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1792-1897
Extent: 28 items
Description: Items relating to materials about the Native peoples of Eastern North America. Topics include papers and articles, particularly those considered for publication (on the relation of pentagonal dodecahedron found near Marietta, Ohio, to shamanism; memoir on aboriginal monuments; memoir of Dr. Charles D. Meigs on bones and burial customs; multiple items regarding a letter from S. P. Hullihen to Dr. Richard Harlan regarding inscription on a stone found at Grave Creek near Wheeling, and Thomas Townsend's claim to prior publication rights to Grave Creek inscription; Caleb Forshey's paper describing a great mound in Adams County, Mississippi; Cushing's publication on exploration of ancient key dwellers' remains on the Gulf Coast of Florida; a response to Henry Phillips' article on supposed runic inscriptions at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia); requests for information or materials (Samuel Miller's request for copies of designated Indian vocabularies of Delaware, Cherokee, Creek, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Osage, for training missionaries of United Foreign Missionary Society); donations to APS ("curiosities" taken from Indian grave near Cincinnati; relics and fossil shells found in Huntingdon County, West Virginia;"western productions"); Peter S. du Ponceau's work on Southern Indian languages and customs (including Creek, Natchez, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Yuchi), Indian vocabularies, and for APS; information from Judge William C. Frazer (Wisconsin Territory, Superior County), concerning discovery of burned bricks in Aztalan Mound, Jefferson County, Wisconsin; Cutler's estimation of age of Ohio mounds referred to in Barton (1787) using tree-ring dating; sketch of the plan of an ancient work three miles southeast of Lexington (Kentucky); American Antiquarian Society's plans to publish a volume on mounds based on Caleb Atwater's data; and comparative vocabularies of British Columbia tribes. Other individuals mentioned include Murray, Duralde, Colonel Smith, Benjamin Hawkins, Robley Dunglison, Isaac Lea, Benjamin W. Richards, George M. Wharton, Nathaniel Ware, General Wayne, Dr. Tolmie, George M. Dawson, and Abelard Tomlinson.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Lenape | Haudenosaunee | Mohawk | Oneida | Seminole
Alternate forms: Lenape, Iroquois
Language(s): French
Date: circa 1837
Extent: 2 volumes
Description: These two bound volumes contain a published first edition, 1837, of Jean Baptiste Gaspard Roux de Rochelle's Etats-Unis D'Amerique (History of the United States of America), a Frenchman's take on American history and culture, and a companion volume of original sketches used for the 96 engraved plates. Many of the images--of American scenes and history--in the second volume appear to be based on the work of de Bry and other artists. Some are in color. There are 27 original drawings of Native Americans and 27 steel engravings of the same. They depict indigenous people, primarily from the, in native attire hunting, fishing, playing, mourning, warring, eating, cooking, and celebrating. Some illustrations accompanying the early text are based on Theodore De Bry's engravings of John White's watercolor drawings of Roanoke in 1585. The later historical text is accompanied by illustrations of Oneidas, Mohawks, and Delawares conferring or warring with Europeans. There are also sketches of petroglyphs, pottery, wampum, and headgear. Illustrators and engravers include Vernier, Branche, and Milbert. Some images have been digitized.
Collection: Etats-Unis d'amerique (Mss.917.3.R76)

Haudenosaunee | Lenape | Catawba | Cherokee | Houma | Nanticoke | Abenaki | Cayuga | Tutelo | Onondaga | Mohawk | Tuscarora
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1777-1950, bulk 1914-1950
Type:Text
Extent: 23 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Haudenosaunee history, language, and culture. Includes correspondence with Haudenosaunee consultants like John L. Buck, Seth Newhouse, Josiah Hill, David S. Hill, etc., on topics ranging from the seizure of wampum by the Canadian government, Newhouse's request that Speck secure wampum for him, Newhouse's offer to sell Speck his history manuscript, which he has been working on since 1885 [#1650], Haudenosaunee burial customs, religion, etc.; an essay by Jesse Moses titled "The Long-House man, a Six Nations Indian of Canada speaks his mind," about the relationship of Christianity and the long-house religion; Speck's correspondence with William N. Fenton, principally concerning field work among the Catawba, Cherokee, and Houma but also touching on Fenton's Seneca field work, Speck's various studies of the Haudenosaunee, and the Second Conference on Iroquois Research; correspondence with other anthropologists about various aspects of Haudenosaunee history and culture such as material culture specimens, archaeology, historical sources, agriculture, education, warfare, religion, population statistics, etc.; a draft of Speck's "Reflections on Iroquois religion" and related correspondence; an undated document describing a meeting of Delaware, Nanticoke, and Canadian Iroquois in the presence of Speck and recounting the injustices suffered by Indians in United States and Canada; a copy of a 1777 treaty made by Peter F. Timothy, a Moravian Delaware, in August 1888, and transmitted to Speck by Jesse Moses; and Speck's research notes and other miscellaneous correspondence on topics such as masks, art, museum specimens, hunting territory, chiefships, words, warfare with the Abenaki, the Delaware-as-women theme, academic publications and conferences, etc.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Penobscot | Ojibwe | Seneca | Lenape
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Lenape
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: circa 1930s-1960s
Type:Text
Extent: 4 folders, 1 box
Description: The C. F. Voegelin Papers contain correspondence, notes, texts, articles, and other linguistic and ethnographic materials relating to Penobscot language and culture. These are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II of the Voegelin Papers. Materials in Subcollection I include correspondence with Frank Siebert (regarding his Penobscot fieldwork, particularly mourning and mortuary customs); 1 box of Ojibwa [Ojibwe], Seneca, and Penobscot notes in Series II. and Penobscot material in Ojibwe Folder #24 in Series VI. Notebooks. In Subcollection II, there is Frank Siebert's "Bumole, The Air Sprite" (a story in Penobscot and in English, sent to Voegelin in 1939) in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries III. Macro-Algonquian; and a Penobscot file in Series V. Card Files.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Tutelo | Lenape | Cayuga | Onondaga
Language(s): English
Date: 1931-1942
Type:Text
Extent: 5 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's interest in Tutelo language, history, and culture. These include three letters from Canadian (Grand River, Ontario) Delaware Samuel John concerning John's Tutelo background and Speck's visit to Canadian Delawares; Speck's field notes from Grand River, Ontario on recordings of Tutelo and Onondaga songs and noting the order of rites [see also Speck (1942)]; Speck's Tutelo field notes from Ohsweken including a notebook of 53 pages of ceremonials, an account of Tutelo ceremonial procedure, a note on the Cayuga burial and redressing ceremony, and letters from indigenous consultants George Nash and Mrs. John Ruck concerning museum specimens; 12 pages of miscellaneous notes and correspondence, including a 1-page list of Tutelo names, 2 pages on Longhouse religious ceremonies, 1 note card and 4 pages of reading notes on adoption rites, two letters from John R. Swanton to Speck citing Byrd's History of the Dividing Line for Sappony-Tutelo references and concerning Tutelo linguistic forms and relationships, a letter from William N. Fenton to Speck concerning Tutelo songs and difficulties of attending Seneca longhouse ceremonies, and a letter from H. W. Dorsey (Smithsonian Institution) transmitting a photo of a Tutelo adoption necklace; and an 11-page draft of an essay on Tutulo ceremonies focusing on the adoption rite. (NOTE: portions of these materials pertaining to Tutelo ceremonies may be restricted due to potential cultural sensitivity.)
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)