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Lenape | Nottoway
Date: 1840
Subject: Botany | Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume, 11 p.
Description: This small manuscript volume contains a brief vocabulary written down by John Wood "from an old Indian Woman of the name of Edie Turner the 4th of March 1820"; together with newsclipping, Petersburg, Virginia, March 17, identifying informant and relating Nottoway, Powhatan and Welsh. The vocabulary is listed by semantic categories "Of the Universe; Of the Human Species; Of Animals; Vegetable Kingdom; Division of Time; Domestic Essays; Adjectives; Verbs." Marginal comparisons with Tuscarora, Onondaga, Wyandot, Delaware, etc., probably by Peter S. Du Ponceau. [See also letters of Jefferson to Du Ponceau, July 7, 1820; Du Ponceau to Jefferson, July 12, 1820.] This item is bound with a list of the Latin and botanical names of the plants, prepared by Christian Frederick Kampman, and with John Wood, "Vocabulary of the language of the Nottoway Tribe of Indians..." (1820).
Collection: Nottoway, Lenape, and Algonquian vocabularies (Mss.497.3.W85)

Anishinaabe | Blackfoot | Arapaho | A'aninin | Cheyenne | Cree | Menominee | Ojibwe | Potawatomi | Kickapoo | Shawnee | Miami | Mi'kmaq | Abenaki | Penobscot | Lenape | Chowanoke | Secotan | Powhatan
Alternate forms: Siksika, Atsina, Gros Ventre, Micmac, Ojibwa, Ojibway
Date: ca.1950s-1996
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 2 linear feet
Description: A considerable amount of Haas' research from the 1950s onwards involved identifying language family relationships and constructing proto-languages. Comparisons, both lexical and phonological, between Algonquian languages and what Haas labeled ‘Proto-Algonkian, ‘Proto-Central Algonkian and ‘Proto-Central-Eastern Algonkian' (often abbreviated to PA, PCA and PCEA respectively) are abundant especially throughout Series 2 and Series 9. Haas made annotations to others' publications, created bibliographies, and developed family trees and lexica of both Proto-Algonquian and a wide variety of Algonquian languages, including several lexica from multiple historical sources in Series 9. Examples of the above are to be found across much of the collection, often in folders of specific Algonquian languages. See individual cultures and languages for specifics.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)