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Cherokee | Natchez
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1939-1975
Type:Text
Extent: 16 folders
Description: This collection documents the entire career of anthropologist and multi-facted intellectual Ashley Montagu from 1927 to 1999. The collection consists of 55.75 linear feet of material, organized into twelve series, plus oversize. Nearly half of the collection is Montagu's correspondence with colleagues, publishers, coauthors, and intellectuals from almost every discipline, as well as admirers from many different walks of life. There also several complete manuscripts of Montagu's work, including The Natural Superiority of Women, The Elephant Man, and The Anatomy of Swearing, as well as numerous journal and magazine articles authored by Montagu. The collection reflects the range of Montagu's intellectual interests and his influence across the spectrum of academic disciplines over his 60-year career. Montagu's writings on race, anthropology, and society, his correspondence with anthropologists and linguists like Franz Boas, Ruth Benedict, and C. F. Voegelin, and his class notes from anthropological coursework at Columbia University (including classes with Boas and Benedict), might yield material relating to Native Americans, but some specific items have also been identified. In the Correspondence series, there is an undated incoming item from the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs. In the Works By series, there is an undated item labeled "The American Indian: The First Victim, Draft," 2 folders relating to North American archaeology ("The Earliest Account of the Association of Human Artifacts with Fossil Mammals in North America, Correspondence" [1951] and "The Earliest Account of the Association of Human Artifacts with Fossil Mammals in North America, Draft" [1944]), 2 folders with undated drafts about Natchez skeletal antomy ("The Natchez Innominate Bone, Draft" and "The Natchez Pelvis, Draft"), and 3 undated items in a folder labeled "Native Americans, Notes." In the Works By Others series, there is Rainer, John C., "Presentation of the American Indian," undated. In the Committees and Organizations series, there are 9 items dated to 1968 in "Association on American Indian Affairs" and 2 undated items in "Native Land Foundation." In the Printed Materials series, there is a copy of Hammel, Harold T., "Thermal and Metabolic Responses of the Alacaluf Indians to Moderate Cold Exposure" (1960), 13 items in a folder labeled "Indian Affairs" (1967-1972; 1975), and 9 items in "Native Americans" (1939-1967). Of particular interest might be materials relating to Sequoya and the invention of the Cherokee syllabary, including "Sequoya, Notes," "Sequoya, Correspondence," (1960-1961), and "Sequoya, Cherokee Indian Genius who Invented an Alphabet and so Brought Literacy to his People, Drafts," all in the Works By series.
Collection: Ashley Montagu papers, 1927-1999 (Mss.Ms.Coll.109)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1941-1946; 1951-1952
Extent: 1,652 pages, 920 slips, 59 phonograph discs, 4,500 cards
Description: The Cherokee materials in the ACLS collection consist of 3 sets of material located in the "Cherokee" section of the finding aid. The smallest item is Frans Olbrechts' brief essay comparing Cherokee and Ethiopic syllabaries. Two linguistic studies comprise the bulk of the remaining materials. Zellig Harris and John Witthoft's "Cherokee materials" was conducted in Philadelphia at the University of Pennsylvania and consists of grammatical Vocabularies and utterances, extensive grammatical notes and analyses, and numerous ethnographic and autobiographical stories, plus some songs, recorded on phonograph discs with Molly Sequoyah (mainly) and Will French. A small number of texts are written in the Cherokee syllabary as well. A second linguistic study by William Reyburn, conducted in Cherokee, N.C., consists of 1000+ pages of linguistic notes, transcriptions of recordings, and analyses, plus an extensive lexical file organized according to morpheme class. Reyburn's accompanying recordings are cataloged as Mss.Rec.16, "Cherokee materials gathered...on the Cherokee reservation at Cherokee, N.C.," listed separately in this guide.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1953, 1960-1961, 1972, 1976-1977, 1980-1981, 1984-1988, 1992-1999, 2012
Type:Text
Extent: 1123 pages
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 19 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Bender, Druke, Fogelson, Huff, Ishii, Jordan, Kilroe, Kosmider, Nichols, Phillips, Phillips, Pulte, Rachlin, Ruff, Scancarelli, Sheidley, Uchihara, and Witthoft. Some of these materials may be restricted due to cultural sensitvity or privacy considerations.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1993-1995
Genre: Interviews
Extent: 6 sound tape reels (5 hr., 27 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Oral history interviews with 15 Cherokee speakers on their background and use of Cherokee, espcially their use of the Cherokee syllabary. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Contemporary usage of the Cherokee syllabary (Mss.Rec.262)

Haudenosaunee | Cherokee | Catawba | Shawnee | Lenape | Wyandot | Miami | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: January 22, 1736; 1744-1774; November 3, 1768; March 14, 1792; 1794; March 10, 1796; August 28, 1817; October 7, 1892; November 11, 1913; November 20, 1913; 1952; 1953-1954; September 1954; Undated
Type:Text
Extent: 14 items
Description: Relavent materials can be found in the finding aid under the specific dates listed. A variety of materials relating to the Haudenosaunee. Eighteenth-century materials include James Logan's treaty instructions to Conrad Weiser in 1736/7; examples of symbols used in treaty signatures by chiefs; miscellaneous items relating to treaties, Indian raids, and land transfers in Virginia;a 1768 deed of land to William Trent; using the Six Nations to make peace with western tribes; Indian agents' accounts, and a journal of a survey of Moravian lands in the Erie triangle translated and edited by Paul A. W. Wallace. Nineteenth-century materials include correspondence regarding Iroquois language and an Iroquois census. Twentieth-century materials include lectures given by Wallace and Leland (on Benjamin Franklin, and on the Deerfield massacre and Eleazer Williams' claim to be the Lost Dauphin, respectively); correspondence between Newhouse and Parker about Newhouse's manuscript history of the "Five Nations Union," the Society of American Indians and possible creation of a Society of Canadian Indians; and Snyderman's essay on ethnohistory, particularly through materials at the American Philosophical Society, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the Quaker Historical Association, and the Haverford College Library. Other individuals mentioned include Shekallemy, Samuel Kirkland, Alfred, Street, Captain Brant, LIttle Billy, George Hoopaugh, Jacob Harmon, John Williams, Warham Williams, Madame de Pentigny, Captain John Stoddard, and John H. Hanson.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Mi'kmaq | Passamaquoddy | Maliseet | Beothuk | Cherokee
Alternate forms: Micmac, Malecite
Language(s): English | Mi'kmaq
Date: 1909-1949
Type:Text
Extent: 8 folders
Description: Materials relating to Mi'kmaq history, language, and culture. Includes Speck's field notes on topics such as wampum, hunting territories, Cape Breton texts, Newfoundland traditions, the Passamaquoddy, etc., as well as a map with names of Bear River Band members and one piece of birch bark with pictographs inscribed; Speck's miscellaneous notes and correspondence on topics such as consultants, specimens, hieroglyphics, linguistics, fieldwork, Mi'kmaq and Cherokee, and the Mi'kmaq mission newspaper; a text on Mi'kmaq dance with interlinear translation, notes, and a musical score; 10 pages of linguistic notes and vocabulary collected along the Miramichi River, along with 6 pages of typed copy by John Witthoft; correspondence with Mechling concerning linguistic research on the Mi'kmaq, Malecite [Malecite-Passamaquoddy], and Oaxaca languages, Mi'kmaq burials, and historic materials on Beothuk and Mi'kmaq; a brief article on a traveler's account of the Mi'kmaq in 1822; an incomplete article or set of reading excerpts taken after 1922 by Speck from John G. Millais (1907); and extracts concerning the sweat house taken by Butler from the Jesuit Relations.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Narragansett | Mohegan | Pequot | Cherokee
Language(s): English | Narragansett
Date: 1916-1926
Type:Text
Extent: 2 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Narragansett language, history, and culture. Includes a one-page report on "Physical measurements of the Narragansett male," based on an individual described as 1/4 Nehantic and 1/2 Brotherton (Narragansett); and Speck's miscellaneous Narragansett notes, comprised of a comparative vocabulary of Massachusetts, Narragansett, Mohegan, Pequot, and Naugatuck (approximately 30 items), 3 vocabulary lists on cards, 1 page of names, and a letter from Edmund B. Delabarre to Speck, May 6, 1920, regarding the author's preference of Cherokee to Narragansett as explanation of origin of characters on Rhode Island stone. Images note: newspaper clipping photographs peace pipe, native attire, tipi.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)