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Otomi | Chitimacha | Atakapa | Cherokee | Osage | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Nottoway | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | Nanticoke | A'aninin | Miami | Mi'kmaq | Seminole | Quapaw | Yuchi | Lenape | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Seneca | Mohawk | Onondaga | Cayuga | Oneida | Tuscarora | Natchez | Wyandot | Creek | Mohican | Mohegan
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Huron-Wyandot, Atsina, Gros Ventre, Micmac, Lenape
Date: 1798-1821
Type:Text
Extent: 219 pages
Description: This volume contains extracts of Benjamin Smith Barton's "New Views of the Origin of the Tribes and Nations of America" (Philadelphia, 1797), with additions by Peter S. Du Ponceau. The bulk of the volume is comprised of word list of 54 words with equivalents listed in a range of 50-70 languages. While Barton listed no authority, Du Ponceau cited sources. Languages with words listed include Chitimacha, Atakapa, Cherokee, Osage, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Nottoway, Kansa, Omaha, Dakota, Pawnee, Nanticoke, Gros Ventres, Miami, Mi'kmaq, Seminole, Quapaw, Yuchi, Delaware, Ojibwe, Shawnee, Seneca, Mohawk, Onondaga, Cayuga, Oneida, Tuscarora, Natches, Wyandot, Creek, Mahican, Mohegan, and many others. The word list includes the terms for God, heaven, and sky, as well as various terms relating to kinship, parts of the body, weather, and more. The volume also includes notes on sounds of the Otomi (Othomi) observations on declension; observations about the Omaha, Kansa, Oto, Arkansas, and Missouri languages; and notes on symbol and sound. Also includes a newspaper clipping of a review (in German) of Barton's "New Views" that appeared in "Göttingische Anzeigen von gelehrten Sachen," June 17, 1799.
Collection: A comparative vocabulary of Indian languages (Mss.497.B28)

Cayuga | Cherokee | Chickasaw | Lenape | Wyandot | Mandan | Ojibwe | Seneca | Susquehannock
Alternate forms: Conestoga, Iroquois, Huron, Wendat
Language(s): Cayuga | English
Date: 1785-1806
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 Linear feet, 2 boxes; 2 volumes
Description: A manuscript compiled from originals in the Historical Society of Pennsylvania by William L. McAtee. Concerns murder of John Armstrong by Indians; mentions Canestogae tribe, Cayahoga path, Cheerake, Chickasaw, Colonel Cresap; tuberculosis among Indians; Delawares; eloquence; Indian barrows, fortifications, and graves; Kash kask kunck; Mandan; Seneca, Six Nations, and Captain White Eyes. Also Crave Creek mound; Wyandot, Indian sugar camp; war customs and war party; treaty of December 1784 at Fort McIntosh with Chippewa and Wyandots; Indian burning; Indian diseases. Teedyuscung; Penn's treaty with the Delaware (1682 and 1702); meaning of "Geneseo"; Seneca battle with Koghquangians (Caughnawaga); Chickasaw; specimen of a Cayuga vocabulary with same list as that used in Barton (1797).
Collection: Benjamin Smith Barton journals; notebooks (Mss.B.B284.1)

Catawba | Houma | Pamunkey | Cheraw | Yuchi | Cherokee | Innu | Naskapi | Dakota | Wateree | Creek | Shawnee | Haudenosaunee | Tutelo | Powhatan
Alternate forms: Montagnais-Naskapi, Sioux, Iroquois
Language(s): English | Catawba
Date: 1914-1947
Type:Text
Extent: 21 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Catawba history, language, and culture. This includes Speck's correspondence with indigenous consultants such as Red Thunder Cloud, Chief Sam Blue, and Leola Blue (Catawba) and Will West Long and Climbing Bear (Cherokee); correspondence with other anthropologists and linguists, such as John Reed Swanton, William N. Fenton, Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, C.F. Voegelin, Morris Swadesh, A. I. Hallowell, Mary Haas, and others; genealogies of twentieth-century Catawba consultants; a Catawba bibliography; notes on topics including Catawba division of time, travel and expedition, food resources, racial status in the South, and notes, possibly for a lecture, titled "The Catawba-A Small Nation Deflated"; a University of Pennsylvania student's essay on Catawba tribal correspondence with J. Walter Fewkes about Speck's Catawba field trips; field notebooks devoted to ethnologic notes, vocabulary, texts, songs, and other linguistic and cultural data; and collections of notes devoted to Catawba language and texts, general ethnological notes, and miscellaneous notes. Some of the notes and notebooks and much of the correspondence mentions other indigenous groups as well.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Catawba | Cherokee | Tutelo
Language(s): English | Catawba | Tutelo
Date: 1716; 1803; 1951-1997
Extent: 7 boxes
Description: The Catawba materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are primarily concentrated in Series II. These consist of copies of secondary sources such as an "Indian Vocabulary from Fort Christanna, 1716, Catawba census notes, 1830-1929, land claim agreements, and a dictionary of Place names in South Carolina. Original materials include hundreds of pages of Siebert's FIeld notes and a Catawba vocabulary / dictionary done with Wes Taukchiray.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Cherokee | Oneida | Onondaga | Cayuga | Seneca | Tuscarora | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Date: 1946-1989
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Cayuga materials in the Lounsbury Papers are located primarily in the "Cayuga" section of Series II, which contains extensive field notes and transcriptions made by both Lounsbury and Michael Foster of Cayuga stories and speeches given by Alexander General, Howard Skye, and Mrs. George Green, along with related discussions. See also Series VII, Audio Recordings, which includes some recordings featuring the Thanksgiving Address and the Condolence ceremony. See also correspondence in Series I, which includes Michael K. Foster's work on Cayuga Midwinter ceremonies, William Sturtevant's work with Oklahoma Seneca-Cayuga, and Marius Barbeau's materials on Cayuga and Tuscarora.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: circa 1784, 1800, 1818
Type:Text
Extent: 42 pages
Description: The Cherokee materials in this collection consist of manuscripts listed in the finding aid as items 2, 5, 6, 38, 39, 41, 42. These include Vocabularies in various forms, some comparing Cherokee to other languages, as well as correspondence discussing Cherokee linguistics features, and one complaining of white harassment of Cherokees to be removed.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Historical and Literary Committee, American Indian Vocabulary Collection    (Mss.497.V85)

Cherokee
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: 1828-1905; 1939-1975
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Lounsbury Papers is found primarily in several sections of the collection. Series I contains correspondence with a number of people on Cherokee language and culture. These correspondents include Harry Basehart, William Cook, William Fenton, John D. Gillespie, Mary Haas, Jack Kilpatrick, John Witthoft. In Series II, see the "Cherokee" section, which contains 3 boxes of research materials, including Lounsbury's field notes with numerous Cherokee speakers in Oklahoma, copies of original notes by other linguists, language instruction materials, and other related documents. The "General Iroquois" section contains some comparative materials as well, as may other sections to smaller degrees. Series VI contains multiple boxes of card files with Cherokee language data in the form of lexicons and texts in translation. In Series VII, there are several audio recordings, including a reading of Private John G. Burnett's eyewitness account of Cherokee removal, 1838-1839, and a significant number of recordings of songs and dances made by Will West Long and Della Owl, and Cherokee lessons by Robert Bushyhead and William Cook.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Cherokee | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1928-1930
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 233 pages, 30 slips
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Frans Olbrechts Papers consist of 3 items, all found in Series I. These items are: "2-A: Cherokee-Iroquois notes"; "2-B: Notes on the Iroquois Connection of Cherokee," a draft essay on linguistic comparisons between Cherokee and "Iroquois" (specific Iroquoian language unclear); and "6: Comparative relative pronouns," a notebook containing word comparison tables with other Iroquoian languages.
Collection: Frans M. Olbrechts papers (Mss.497.3.OL2)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | Natchez | English
Date: 1940s, undated
Type:Text
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: Haas' Cherokee file is centered on her fieldwork in Oklahoma with Watt Sam and Nancy Raven, both Natchez speakers who also spoke Cherokee and Creek. Although Creek was the dominant intermediary language between Natchez and English for both of Haas' Natchez consultants, some Cherokee lexica and verb paradigms were recorded in the Natchez notebooks of Series 2. There is also a small amount of Cherokee material in Victor Riste's notebooks in the same Natchez subseries. Series 9 contains lexica, paradigms, phonotactics, and dialectal variation, likely mostly derived from these sources. Besides these, there are some discussions of Cherokee town names and consultants in Series 1, and a few comparisons to Iroquoian and Muskogean languages.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1953, 1960-1961, 1972, 1976-1977, 1980-1981, 1984-1988, 1992-1999, 2012
Type:Text
Extent: 1123 pages
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 19 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Bender, Druke, Fogelson, Huff, Ishii, Jordan, Kilroe, Kosmider, Nichols, Phillips, Phillips, Pulte, Rachlin, Ruff, Scancarelli, Sheidley, Uchihara, and Witthoft. Some of these materials may be restricted due to cultural sensitvity or privacy considerations.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)