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Cherokee | Natchez
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1939-1975
Type:Text
Extent: 16 folders
Description: This collection documents the entire career of anthropologist and multi-facted intellectual Ashley Montagu from 1927 to 1999. The collection consists of 55.75 linear feet of material, organized into twelve series, plus oversize. Nearly half of the collection is Montagu's correspondence with colleagues, publishers, coauthors, and intellectuals from almost every discipline, as well as admirers from many different walks of life. There also several complete manuscripts of Montagu's work, including The Natural Superiority of Women, The Elephant Man, and The Anatomy of Swearing, as well as numerous journal and magazine articles authored by Montagu. The collection reflects the range of Montagu's intellectual interests and his influence across the spectrum of academic disciplines over his 60-year career. Montagu's writings on race, anthropology, and society, his correspondence with anthropologists and linguists like Franz Boas, Ruth Benedict, and C. F. Voegelin, and his class notes from anthropological coursework at Columbia University (including classes with Boas and Benedict), might yield material relating to Native Americans, but some specific items have also been identified. In the Correspondence series, there is an undated incoming item from the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs. In the Works By series, there is an undated item labeled "The American Indian: The First Victim, Draft," 2 folders relating to North American archaeology ("The Earliest Account of the Association of Human Artifacts with Fossil Mammals in North America, Correspondence" [1951] and "The Earliest Account of the Association of Human Artifacts with Fossil Mammals in North America, Draft" [1944]), 2 folders with undated drafts about Natchez skeletal antomy ("The Natchez Innominate Bone, Draft" and "The Natchez Pelvis, Draft"), and 3 undated items in a folder labeled "Native Americans, Notes." In the Works By Others series, there is Rainer, John C., "Presentation of the American Indian," undated. In the Committees and Organizations series, there are 9 items dated to 1968 in "Association on American Indian Affairs" and 2 undated items in "Native Land Foundation." In the Printed Materials series, there is a copy of Hammel, Harold T., "Thermal and Metabolic Responses of the Alacaluf Indians to Moderate Cold Exposure" (1960), 13 items in a folder labeled "Indian Affairs" (1967-1972; 1975), and 9 items in "Native Americans" (1939-1967). Of particular interest might be materials relating to Sequoya and the invention of the Cherokee syllabary, including "Sequoya, Notes," "Sequoya, Correspondence," (1960-1961), and "Sequoya, Cherokee Indian Genius who Invented an Alphabet and so Brought Literacy to his People, Drafts," all in the Works By series.
Collection: Ashley Montagu papers, 1927-1999 (Mss.Ms.Coll.109)

Catawba | Houma | Pamunkey | Cheraw | Yuchi | Cherokee | Innu | Naskapi | Dakota | Wateree | Creek | Shawnee | Haudenosaunee | Tutelo | Powhatan
Alternate forms: Montagnais-Naskapi, Sioux, Iroquois
Language(s): English | Catawba
Date: 1914-1947
Type:Text
Extent: 21 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Catawba history, language, and culture. This includes Speck's correspondence with indigenous consultants such as Red Thunder Cloud, Chief Sam Blue, and Leola Blue (Catawba) and Will West Long and Climbing Bear (Cherokee); correspondence with other anthropologists and linguists, such as John Reed Swanton, William N. Fenton, Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, C.F. Voegelin, Morris Swadesh, A. I. Hallowell, Mary Haas, and others; genealogies of twentieth-century Catawba consultants; a Catawba bibliography; notes on topics including Catawba division of time, travel and expedition, food resources, racial status in the South, and notes, possibly for a lecture, titled "The Catawba-A Small Nation Deflated"; a University of Pennsylvania student's essay on Catawba tribal correspondence with J. Walter Fewkes about Speck's Catawba field trips; field notebooks devoted to ethnologic notes, vocabulary, texts, songs, and other linguistic and cultural data; and collections of notes devoted to Catawba language and texts, general ethnological notes, and miscellaneous notes. Some of the notes and notebooks and much of the correspondence mentions other indigenous groups as well.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Cherokee | Oneida | Onondaga | Cayuga | Seneca | Tuscarora | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Date: 1946-1989
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Cayuga materials in the Lounsbury Papers are located primarily in the "Cayuga" section of Series II, which contains extensive field notes and transcriptions made by both Lounsbury and Michael Foster of Cayuga stories and speeches given by Alexander General, Howard Skye, and Mrs. George Green, along with related discussions. See also Series VII, Audio Recordings, which includes some recordings featuring the Thanksgiving Address and the Condolence ceremony. See also correspondence in Series I, which includes Michael K. Foster's work on Cayuga Midwinter ceremonies, William Sturtevant's work with Oklahoma Seneca-Cayuga, and Marius Barbeau's materials on Cayuga and Tuscarora.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1941-1946; 1951-1952
Extent: 1,652 pages, 920 slips, 59 phonograph discs, 4,500 cards
Description: The Cherokee materials in the ACLS collection consist of 3 sets of material located in the "Cherokee" section of the finding aid. The smallest item is Frans Olbrechts' brief essay comparing Cherokee and Ethiopic (Ge'ez) syllabaries (item I2.1). Zellig Harris and John Witthoft's "Cherokee materials" (item I2.4) was conducted in Philadelphia at the University of Pennsylvania and consists of grammatical Vocabularies and utterances, extensive grammatical notes and analyses, and numerous ethnographic and autobiographical stories, plus some songs, recorded on phonograph discs with Molly Sequoyah (mainly) and Will French. A small number of texts are written in the Cherokee syllabary as well. A second linguistic study by William Reyburn (item I2.3), conducted in Cherokee, North Carolina, consists of 1000+ pages of linguistic notes, transcriptions of recordings, and analyses, plus an extensive lexical file organized according to morpheme class. Reyburn's accompanying recordings are cataloged as Mss.Rec.16, "Cherokee materials gathered...on the Cherokee reservation at Cherokee, N.C.," listed separately in this guide.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Cherokee | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1979 and undated
Type:Text
Genre: Drafts | Essays | Notes
Extent: 5 folders
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history. See the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's long and varied career, and for an itemized list of the collection's contents. Though further research might yield more results, five items directly relating to Cherokees have been identified. In Series I. Correspondence, see folders for Edward C. Carter, Paul Kutsche, and Jean Laub. In Series II. B. Revitalization and Culture, there is a folder of 38 items relating to Raymond Fogelson's "Cherokee Booger Mask Tradition" (1979). In Series IV. Works by Wallace A. Professional, there is an undated folder titled "Symposium on Cherokee and Iroquois Culture."
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)

Cherokee | Seneca | Oneida
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: circa 1946-1953 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 3 folders
Description: Three items relating to the Cherokee language have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. In Subcollection I, there is relevant correspondence with Floyd Lounsbury (regarding Oneida, Seneca, and Cherokee work) in Series I. Correspondence. In Subcollection II, there is a Cherokee folder in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries IV. Macro-Siouan; and William D. Reyburn's "Cherokee Verb Morphology" (circa 1953) in Series IV. Works by Others.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Cherokee | Creek
Language(s): English
Date: undated
Type:Text
Genre: Essays
Extent: 1 page
Description: "The cause of the Indians." Opposes Indian removal; criticizes Georgia for evicting Creek and Cherokee from their lands. Signed "Veritas."
Collection: C. S. (Constantine Samuel) Rafinesque correspondence and writings (Mss.B.R124)

Cherokee
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: 1828-1905; 1939-1975
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Lounsbury Papers is found primarily in several sections of the collection. Series I contains correspondence with a number of people on Cherokee language and culture. These correspondents include Harry Basehart, William Cook, William Fenton, John D. Gillespie, Mary Haas, Jack Kilpatrick, John Witthoft. In Series II, see the "Cherokee" section, which contains 3 boxes of research materials, including Lounsbury's field notes with numerous Cherokee speakers in Oklahoma, copies of original notes by other linguists, language instruction materials, and other related documents. The "General Iroquois" section contains some comparative materials as well, as may other sections to smaller degrees. Series VI contains multiple boxes of card files with Cherokee language data in the form of lexicons and texts in translation. In Series VII, there are several audio recordings, including a reading of Private John G. Burnett's eyewitness account of Cherokee removal, 1838-1839, and a significant number of recordings of songs and dances made by Will West Long and Della Owl, and Cherokee lessons by Robert Bushyhead and William Cook.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Cherokee | Lenape | Yuchi | Creek | Seneca | Catawba | Choctaw
Alternate forms: Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1920-1951
Type:Text
Extent: 17 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Cherokee history and culture. This includes 24 pages of correspondence with Cherokee collaborators like Will West Long and Allen W. Long; 47 pages of field notes; notes and drafts relating to the preparation of Speck's manuscript on Cherokee music, dance, and drama; correspondence with colleagues such as George Herzog and Leonard Broom on Cherokee music, dance, and drama; correspondence with Franz Boas concerning copying of his Catawba texts and the Cherokee field work of Frans Olbrechts; correspondence with Will West Long about museum specimens; a biographical sketch of Will West Long; a postcard to Marian Godfrey regarding Cherokee Museum specimens; a letter to E. B. Norvell regarding silver trade goods and European imitations sold by the Cherokee; a bibliography of Cherokee sources, Publication 68650, listing 48 items, 1775-1922, prepared by the Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Affairs; a copy of a 1566-1567 letter (7 pages in English, with introduction by Speck) written by Juan Pardo relating early Spanish contact with the Cherokee; an account of the Cherokee and Delaware alliance given by Witapanóxwe (War Eagle and James Webber); a transcription of an 1818 letter written by Charles Hicks on the manners and customs of the Cherokees; correspondence about Cherokee basketry; correspondence regarding the accuracy of material in Robert Strange, Eoneguski, or the Cherokee Chief (1939); and 27 pages of miscellanous notes.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Cherokee | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1928-1930
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 233 pages, 30 slips
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Frans Olbrechts Papers consist of 3 items, all found in Series I. These items are: "2-A: Cherokee-Iroquois notes"; "2-B: Notes on the Iroquois Connection of Cherokee," a draft essay on linguistic comparisons between Cherokee and "Iroquois" (specific Iroquoian language unclear); and "6: Comparative relative pronouns," a notebook containing word comparison tables with other Iroquoian languages.
Collection: Frans M. Olbrechts papers (Mss.497.3.OL2)