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Shawnee | Lenape | Potawatomi | Meskwaki | Menominee | Cree | Ojibwe | Blackfoot | Cheyenne | Ktunaxa | Penobscot | Mi'kmaq
Alternate forms: Lenape, Fox, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Micmac
Date: circa 1930s-1960s
Extent: 25 folders, 1 box
Description: There are many materials relating to Algonquian languages in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. This entry is intended as a catch-all for materials labeled as Algonquian or Macro-Algonquian, or having to do with several Algonquian languages in a general way. Researchers should also view the entries for specific Algonquian languages and culture groups. Algonquian materials are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II. In Subcollection I, there is relevant correspondence with Leonard Bloomfield (regarding an inscription on a silver bracelet; Bloomfield's "Menomini Grammar"), Charles Hockett (with questions about Voegelin's article on Delaware and examples from other Algonquian languages), and Morris Swadesh (including a brief Stockbridge vocabulary and a slip of Moravian Delaware) in Series I. Correspondence; 1 box of comparative Algonquian vocabulary and grammar in Series II. and several linguistic maps (i.e., "Algonquian language text with illustrations" and "Linguistic classification of the Southern New England Algonquians"), particularly of the Potawatomi, Delaware, and Shawnee, to accompany the texts of Voegelin's work on Algonquian languages, in Series VII. Photographs. In Subcollection II, there is relevant correspondence from Eric Hamp (to Ives Goddard regarding preparation of Arapaho and Algonquian works) and Frank Speck (to Edward Sapir regarding his work on Mi'kmaq and other northern Algonquian languages and societies) in Series I. Correspondence. There is also an entire subseries devoted to Macro-Algonquian: Subseries III. Macro-Algonquian of Series II. Research Notes. This subseries contains a grammatical sketch of Algonquian by Leonard Bloomfield (135 pages of typescript with handwritten edits and 7 interleaved pages of notes by Voegelin); another "Sketch of Algonquian" by Bloomfield consisting of a notebook (approx. 45 pages) and handwritten notes (approx. 80 pages); 5 folders of notebooks focusing on beginning sounds ("Č and K," "L and M," "N and P," " Š and T," and "Θ and ?"), drawing from Pacific Coast Algonquian ("PCA"), Fox [Meskwaki], Plains Cree, Menominee, and Ojibwe; 3 folders of other comparative Algonquian notebooks organized by general nouns, body parts, kinship terms, numerals, and verbs; miscellaneous Algonquian notes; and specimens of Central Algonquian, including short texts in Fox [Meskwaki], Ojibwe, Menominee, and Plains Cree, with English translations. The rest of the material in the Macro-Algonquian folder is organized according to specific languages: Blackfoot, Cheyenne, Fox (Meskwaki), Kutenai [Ktunaxa culture], Ojibwe, Penobscot, and Shawnee. Finally, there is an article titled "Some Observations on Algonquian Phonology" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries I: General works; an incomplete typed draft of Bloomfield's "Sketch of Algonquian" in Series IV. Works by Others; and a "Linguistic map of Southern New England" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries V: American Indian Languages.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Anishinaabe | Blackfoot | Cree | Dakota | Métis | Kainai | Nakoda | Ojibwe | Secwépemc
Alternate forms: Blood, Ojibwa, Saulteaux, Shuswap, Simpcw, Sioux, Stoney
Language(s): English
Date: 1905-1910
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: Norman Leonard Jacobs was an engineer and surveyor with the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway in Canada. The collection consists of his correspondence with Bessie Frank (later Anathan), an acquaintance from Pittsburgh. Jacobs wrote of daily life in Canadian cities like Winnipeg and Edmonton, interactions with First Nations, and daily hardships encountered in the field (extreme cold, snowblindness, and lack of food), but also spoke of his work with pride and enthusiasm. In addition to the letters, Jacobs wrote twenty-eight pages of a "Diary of a Tenderfoot." Also included in the collection are two photobooks and various loose photographs, which display various aspects of camp life, details of work sites and the Canadian landscape, and First Nations peoples. Some of the photographs are extremely faded. Native peoples mentioned include Ojibwe, Blackfoot, Cree, "Surteau" (likely Saulteaux),"Bloods" (Kainai), "Stonies" (Nakoda, or "Stoney"), as well as Native people at Tete Jaune Cache who are likely Simpcw. The images include family groups; men, women, and children fishing; men (some apparently hired by Jacobs or his company to act as guides and carriers in the field) working with an infant in a cradleboard; Ojibwe graves; tepees [tipis]; "Sioux" warriors; a sweat bath; horse races; individuals like Joe KaeKwitch, Chief Handorgan, Chief Wingard, Muskowken, etc. Most of these materials have been digitized and are available through the APS's Digital Library. Also see the finding aid for more background information on Jacobs and detailed itemized lists for both Series I. Correspondence and Series II. Graphic Materials.
Collection: Anathan-Jacobs Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Collection (Mss.SMs.Coll.13)

Blackfoot
Alternate forms: Siksika
Language(s): English | Blackfoot
Date: circa 1930s-1960s
Type:Text
Extent: 13 folders, 2 boxes
Description: The C. F. Voegelin Papers contain correspondence, card files, notes, notebooks, Vocabularies, and other linguistic and ethnographic materials relating to Blackfoot language and culture. These are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II of the Voegelin Papers. Materials in Subcollection I include 2 boxes of card files (mostly vocabulary) and 2 folders of document files in Series II. Card Files. Of particular interest in Folder #1 might be some notes on vocabulary and eight pages of an incomplete letter, apparently to Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, from someone based at the Blackfoot agency doing fieldwork under the auspices of Clark Wissler and working with Mr. Calfchild. The writer mentions societies, exogamy, kinship, reciprocity, bands, etc. Folder #2 contains child-focused material including typed texts (mostly sporadic comments) obtained from children, fragments of typed observations about children's interactions and language use, and a two-page list of 24 Blackfoot children, with their full names, ages, and sometimes notes about their fluency or references to texts and other works for which these individuals were apparently consulted. There is also a bundle of texts, mostly about Blackfoot societies and their origins, labeled "Old Bull (Shultz's Informant)" [Possibly a reference to James Willard Schultz (1859-1947)]. Continuing with Subcollection I, there is also 1 folder of undated linguistic notes in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-A: Language Notes; a folder containing the typed transcript of a dialogue (between children at play) between Velma Bear Hat and Margaret Water Chief in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-B: Text; and 3 undated folders in Series VI. Notebooks (which were described in detail by Richard A. Rhodes, Department of Linguistics at the University of California-Berkeley, in 1988, and include vocabulary, stories, work on paradigms, vowel clusters, suffixes, numerals, kinship terms, and some ethnographic information in #3). Blackfoot materials in Subcollection II include correspondence with Oscar Lewis (regarding Blackfoot culture and linguistic classfication, particularly in relation to Kutenai, and including a paper Lewis sent and Voegelin's response) and Edward Sapir (mentioning work on Blackfoot, Algonquin and Wiyot) in Series I. Correspondence; and several folders in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries III. Macro-Algonquian. The latter contain Blackfoot grammatical notes, Blackfoot prefixes, sketches of Blackfoot designs, and 8 notebooks. Blackfoot notebooks 1-7 contain stories (Blackfoot with interlinear English), Vocabularies, and names of speakers, and a separate unnumbered Blackfoot notebook contains ethnographic notes in English, though some Blackfoot terms and phrases are included.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Blackfoot
Alternate forms: Siksika
Language(s): Blackfoot | English
Date: 1960s-1970s
Subject: Linguistics | Games
Type:Text
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: Haas' Blackfoot file was produced concurrently with PhD student Allan Taylor's dissertation, a grammar of the language, and Taylor appears to have produced much of it as a result of fieldwork. The file includes reprints with marginalia, phonology, a field notebook containing 15 pages of basic vocabulary and paradigms in Series 2 Subseries ‘Multiple Languages', and lexica with Proto-Algonquian comparisons, in Series 9.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Blackfoot | Piegan
Language(s): English
Date: 1942, 1950
Type:Text
Extent: 6+ folders
Description: The Blackfoot material in the Fenton papers are found in Series I, including correspondence with Blackfeet Tribal Business Council, Felix Cohen, Paul L. Fickinger, and U.S. Dept. of Interior. See also Lucien M. Hanks in this same section for letter concerning field work among the Siksika (Northern Blackfoot) at Gleichen, Alberta in the 1940s. Series V contains Fenton's field notes from the Blackfeet Reservation in 1950.
Collection: William N. Fenton papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.20)

A'aninin | Anishinaabe | Apache | Apache, Plains | Apache, Western | Arapaho | Arikara | Assiniboine | Blackfoot | Caddo | Catawba | Cayuga | Cherokee | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Comanche | Creek | Crow | Lenape | Flathead | Haudenosaunee | Ho-Chunk | Hopi | Houma | Iñupiat | Iowa | Isleta | Kaw | Kickapoo | Laguna | Lakota | Mandan | Menominee | Meskwaki | Munsee | Nez Perce | Ojibwe | Omaha | Oneida | Otoe | Odawa | Penobscot | Pawnee | Ponca | Potawatomi | Quapaw | Seminole | Seneca | Shawnee | Shoshone | Stockbridge-Munsee | Tsimshian | Wabanaki | Wichita | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Arapahoe, Chippewa, Eskimo, Gros Ventre, Iroquois, Kansa, Lenape, Muscogee, Niimíipu, Odawa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Salish, Sioux, Sac-and-Fox, Sauk-and-Fox, Winnebago, Wyandotte
Language(s): English
Date: 1939-1943
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: There are a few items in the Frank G. Speck Papers currently identified as relating to Indian boarding schools.In the collection guide, under Subcollection 1, Series 1, in Section IV, "Southeast," see item IV(15H3), "Yuchi miscellaneous notes," which contains a letter from Ann Rolland (Haskell Institute), to Speck, April 6, 1941, as well as items under "C. Houma (Louisiana)" that relate to mission schools. In Section XIII, "Miscellaneous," see item XIII(22H), "Haskell Institute Roster," which lists of Native students and the Haskell Institute boarding school in 1939-1940, giving name, age, address, and tribe. (The tribes of the students included are listed above in this entry.) In Subcollection I, Series II, Biographical Material, see letters (listed alphabetically by author) from Leona E. Giger and Ann Rolland, both students at Haskell in the early 1940s. Also see letter from "Redge" and Gladys Laulin regarding Chippewa boy returning home for dances. In Series III, Photographs, there is an undated photograph [#10-14(a)] from the Shingwauk Indian Residential School. See also school-related photos in folders "Creek #3," "Eskimo [Inuit] (Labrador) #4," "Houma #1," #2, #7, and #8, "Pamunkey #6," and "Penobscot: People #2." In Series IV, Lantern Slides, there are slides of Native and Black students at the Hampton Institute. More boarding school-related material may be identified in the collection with further research.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Haudenosaunee | Cree | Blackfoot | Lenape | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape, Huron-Wyandot
Language(s): English
Date: 1920-1965
Type:Text
Extent: 4 items
Description: Materials on miscellaneous or general topics relating to Paul A. W. Wallace's interest in Native North American histories and cultures. Items include Wallace's correspondence with Francisco Guerra and R. Jerrel Williams regarding references pertaining to Indian medicine; notes on and different versions of a talk titled "Debt We Owe the Indian" given by Wallace at Farmers' Forum, York, Pennsylvania, the Madison Historical Society, New Jersey, etc.; Wallace's correspondence with William Ezra Lingelbach regarding Wallace's research on John Heckewelder, the Muhlenberg family, Indians of Pennsylvania, the Six Nations, collections in the Library of the American Philosophical Society, Cree, Blackfoot, etc.; and Wallace's correspondence with Charles Marius Barbeau concerning a wide range of topics such as French-Canadian folklore, Edward Ahenakew's Manebogo manuscript, Conrad Weiser and the Delawares, the American Philosophical Society, Barbeau's Huron-Wyandot work, filming of the Contrecoeur papers and Huron grammars at Seminaire de Quebec, and Richard Pilant and the founding of an international Institute of Iroquoian Studies.
Collection: Paul A. W. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64b)

Blackfoot | Dakota | Walla Walla | Nez Perce | Mandan | Shoshone | Hidatsa | Arikara | Crow | Chinook | Wishram | Assiniboine | Sahaptin | Pawnee | Osage | Kickapoo | Omaha | Lakota | Cheyenne | Arapaho | Kiowa | Ojibwe | Cree | A'aninin | Salish | Meskwaki
Alternate forms: Atsina, Gros Ventre, Sioux, Flathead, Sauk-and-Fox
Language(s): English
Date: 1804-1806
Type:Text
Extent: 6 red morocco book; 80 pages; 3 notebooks; 1 volume;
Description: The Plains materials in the Lewis and Clark journals includes observations on the Arikaras, Assiniboines, Blackfoot, Mandan, Minnetaree, Shoshoni, Blackfoot, Flathead-Tushepaw, Dakota Sioux, Mandan, and Minnetaree, Otos, Sauks, Iowa, Kansas, Kickapoo, Missouri, Omaha, Osage, Pawnees, Ponca, Sioux, Cheyenne (Arapaho), Arikara, Blackfoot, Crow, Kansas, Kiowa, Sioux, Yankton, Memacarjo, Teton, Waupatone, Cascarba, Sisseton, Waupacootar, Hoindeborto, Tecarton, Newastarton, Micacuopsiba, and Siouan, Minnetaree (Gros Ventre), Shoshoni, Assiniboine, Teton Sioux, Mandan, Hidatsa, Showhoni, Arikara, Castahan, Crow, Flathead (Tushepaw), Ootlashoot. The correspondence includes Two letters of Lewis to Jefferson at conclusion of expedition. Replies to questions 6, 7, and 8 concerning Place names and measurement of time and distance; Indian songs. Probably an enclosure in Clark to Biddle, December 7, 1810, printed in Jackson (1962m): 562-564. For Biddle queries see Jackson (1962): 550-554. Mentions Snake, Shoshoni, Castahana, Nemison, Crow or Arpsarrozah, Maw or Pashapalorah. Refers to Indians of Missouri River only: Kanzes, Oto, Missouri, Ponca, Panias (Loups, Republicans), Mahars, Ricares, Mandan, Minetares, Maharha, Ayhawies, Saukes and Reynards, Assiniboine, Christinoes, Cheyenne, Cannarwesh. Mentions Snake Indians. 24 tribes are listed with population, trade, language, and character information included in parallel columns: Osage, Kansas, Otto, Panias, Mahas, Poncaro, Ricaras, Mandans, Ahwahhawa, Minnetaree, Iowa, Saukie; Sioux (Wahparton, Mindawarcarton, Wahpacta, Sissatoni, Yankton, Yankton ah nah, Teton, Teton O Kandandas, Teton Minzarkine, Teton sah one.) Indian tribes mentioned: Cataka, Castahana, Anauawa, Mahar, Sharah-Cheyenne, Ricares, Panias (Loups, Republicans), Padoucas, Cayauwas, Wetapato, Cannavich, Stateton. Mentions Arikara, Gros Ventres, Mandan, Marhaha, Minnetaree, Sioux, and Teton in diary.Arikara (Beuffles de Medecine lodge), Aunahhow or Aunerhoo, Nootarwau, Toowarsar, Tohpahcass, Weheskeu, Wetersoon, (Hidatsa), Arapaho, Assiniboine, Cheyenne, Chippewa, Cree, Crow, Fox, Paduca, Pawnee, Sioux (Sisseton, Teton), Mandan, Minnetaree (Gros Ventre), Shoshoni. Includes list of nations who trade with Arikaras: Aunerhoo, Nootarwau, Toowarsar, Tohpahcass, Weheeskeu-chien, Kunnanarwesh (Arapaho), Tochewahcoo (Fox), Cattarkah (Paducar), Kiewah, Sharhachien. Discusses Arikara, Cheyenne, Comanche, Crow, Kansas, Kickapoo, Mandan, Minnetaree, Omaha, Osage, Dakota, and Teton and Yankton Sioux. Includes list of Crow bands: Shiptahcha, Apsharookee (Absaroka). Also Ecupscuppeah (Tushepaw band) together with locations. Draft list of Western Indians and their locations in Summary of Rivers (Codex N:128-142): Chillatehokle, Potoash, Queets (Quaitson), Pailish, Chiltz, Clamoitomicks, Quinechart, Kilamox. Tribes noted: Ahaharopinopah (Crow band), Alabama, Atacapa, Biloxi, Blood, Cadoquies, Cahokia, Castapanas, Cataka (Haka, Catteka), Cattanahaw, Cherokee, Choctaw, Choketartowomb, Conchates, Creek, Dotames (Dotama, a Paduca group), Ehartsar (Crow band), Esahatenketarpar (Teton Sioux), Hahahartone (Yankton Sioux), Honetaparteen (Yankton, also Honetaparteenwas), Kaskaskia, Keenkesah (Mindawarcarton Sioux), Lalplay (group of Alitan-Snake), Mahtahton (Sioux), Manetopar (Assiniboine-Band lar Gru), Menesharne (Teton Sioux), Miahkeejocksah (Wahpocoota Sioux), Nacota Mahtopanarto (Assiniboine) and Nacota Oseegah, Natchez (Chitemacha), Nemousin (see also Kiowa, Staeton), Noota (Crow band), Otaharton (Wahpatone Sioux), Ozash (Teton Sioux), Pareescar (Crow), Peoria Sahonehontaparpar (Teton Sioux), Sahown (Teton Sioux), Sheo (Teton Sioux), Sosobubar and Sosona (Shoshoni tribe), Tackchandessechar (Sioux-Teton), Tarcoimboto (Yankton Sioux), Tarcoehparh (Teton), Tintahton (Mindawarcarton Sioux), Touincas, Wauneewackataonelar (Teton), Warchinktarhe (Teton), Wetapahatoes and Kiowa (branch of Padouca?), Zaartar (Yankton).Ethnographic materials include a list of natural history specimens sent on November 16, 1805, to the American Philosophical Society by Captain Lewis. 2 pages, copy of Lewis to Jefferson, March 5, 1805, Fort Mandan. Answers written at Fort Mandan to queries concerning Indian land ownership, trade, cultivation, mode of life, mode of taking game, mode of warfare, origins, burial customs, houses, superstitions, modes of punishment, trade, treatment of whites. Data arranged in tabular form with diary observations arranged in one column, 28 pages. Ledger entries comment on plants, giving Kickapoo and Chippewa plant names; 10 pages dated 1800. Ancient fortification on BonHomme Island, the original draft of which is to be found on reverse of Clark's estimate of the western Indians. Mentions Salteaux, Sioux, Mandan, Assiniboine, Oto, Maha, Ponca, Shivitans, Crows, Caneenawees, Shayehn. Printed, Quaife (1916a). See also Jackson (1962): 155-156 for further data. A list of the names of the different nations and tribes of Indians...expressive of the names, languages, numbers, trade, water courses. A large chart listing 72 tribes with parallel columns giving various data. On reverse side only tribes 1-52 are considered, as remainder are Louisiana tribes rather than Missouri and Rocky Mountain Indians. A draft of the "Statistical Estimate..." printed as part of Thomas Jefferson, Message of the President...(February 17, 1806): 9-47. Geographic materials include An account of location of tributaries of the Missouri above Fort Mandan prepared in 1805. This draft appears to antedate the fuller statement in Codex O: 117-128, and supplements the "Summary Statement of the Rivers and Creeks." A lengthy description and list of distances of tributaries of the Missouri from St. Charles to Fort Mandan; an earlier version of the formal statement in Codex O: 69-116 by Lewis. Early draft of Summary Statement of Rivers..."A Summary View of the Rivers and Creeks," pages 69-128; mentions old villages of Missouri and Kansas; recommends trading posts for Oto, Missouri, Poncaras, Panies (Proper, Republican, and Loups), Mahas, Yankton Ahnahs. Mentions Yankton, Sisseton, and Teton Sioux as well as Minnetarees, Mandans, and Ahwahharwas. Pages 116-128 based on Indian information; mentions Flatheads. Probably composed at Fort Mandan, 1804-1805. A translation extracted from journal of James MacKay describing trade route through Lake Superior to the Grand Portage; recording stay with Mandans, Manitouris, and Wattassons in 1797. Includes extract of journal of John Evans, 1796, who visited the Arikaras. Notes by John Hay and his "Description of the route from Mackinac to the Grand Portage," etc., taken by him in 1794.
Collection: Lewis and Clark Journals (Mss.917.3.L58)