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Algonquin | Anishinaabe | Naskapi | Cree | Nipissing | Ojibwe | Rama | Chibcha | Maya | Haudenosaunee | Ktunaxa
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Iroquois, Kutenai
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1912-1941 and undated
Extent: 7 items
Description: Materials relating to both Algonquin and related Algonquian peoples, cultures, and languages. Includes Speck's notes on artifacts found near Lake Abitibi and in the Nipissing district; his Seven Islands field notes, including texts with interlinear translations, house data, names of animals, and a letter in French from Marie Louise Ambroise; abstracts of Speck's published works on the Rama-Chibcha of Nicaragua, River Desert Algonquins, Southern Ontario Indians, Maya, and others; sketches and comments on shoulder blade divination (scapulimancy), including notes on deer drives (including an undated note from A. Irving Hallowell) and the distribution of artifacts among Algonquin, Naskapi, and Mistassini peoples; two field notebooks containing (1) linguistic notes and informant and population data for Waswanipi, Abitibi, Temiskaming [Timiskaming], Nipissing, Algonquian and (2) Temiskaming ethnography, Wisiledjak (Wiskyjack) [Wisakedjak, a manitou] text (in English), Temagami ethnology and texts (in English), and one Iroquois legend; general information on birch-bark containers, including 37 photographs and 40 pages of notes relating to Algonquin, Cree, Ojibwe and Ktunaxa specimens, and a letter from Bella Weitzner; and a letter from A. G. Bailey sending Speck a copy of his book on Algonquians.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Ojibwe | Anishinaabe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1993
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume
Description: Transcript of show "Ideas," copyright by the Canadian Broadcast Corp. Describes the drum ceremony created by Fairwind for the Ojibwa and A. Irving Hallowell's work on Fairwind's drum.
Collection: Fairwind's drum (Mss.970.3.M43f)

Anishinaabe | Hawaiian | Potawatomi | Paiute | Cheyenne | Dakota | Arapaho | Kiowa
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1942-1968
Description: There are many items relating to Indigenous American languages in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. This entry is intended as a catch-all for materials that cover Indigenous American languages in general and might not show up in narrower searches. Researchers should also view the entries for specific languages and regions. For this more general category, there is relevant material in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II. In Subcollection I, there are 7 folders relating to Voegelin's intended publication "American Indian Language" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries III-B: Works Authored by Voegelin [see also the associated material in Oversized]. Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-C: Other contains one file on inscribed stones and the Dene syllabary system and another on the Summer Linguistic Institute (in which many Native North American languages are mentioned). There are also two images of a stone inscribed with what were supposed to be Potawatomi petroglyphs in Series VII. Photographs. Also in Series VII are several language maps (i.e., "Indian language groups in the state of Illinois" and "American Indian Languages"), in which Algonquian languages are particularly well-represented. In Subcollection II, there is relevant correspondence with Wallace Chafe (regarding a census of speakers of indigenous languages), Kenneth Croft (regarding the state of American language work in Mexico, the use of mechanical recording equipment, Cheyenne materials, etc.), Samuel H. Elbert (regarding place names in Hawaii, comparison with Oceania and North America), Dell Hymes (regarding Anthropological Lingustics), Vernon E. Jake (regarding proposed language speaker census, particularly how to discern whether children really know the language), Luis S. Kemnitzer (a thank-you note in which Voegelin revealingly acknowledges, "Although I once worked with the Dakota language, I know little of its culture."), Jerome Kirk (a thank you known in which Voegelin asserts, "I've never found any speaker among the twenty American Indian languages I've worked with who got them [directional terms] straight."), and Morris Swadesh (many languages). Also in Subcollection II, there is a file of notes on classification of North American languages in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries XI. General; some "Ungrouped Tales," two folders with stories about Pechiha (Kickapoo?) and Yellow Horse (Arapaho?) attributed to Joe Pierce and Bruno Nettl, respectively, and a folder on sources in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries II. American Indian Tales for Children; and drafts, linguistic notes and maps in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries V. American Indian Languages.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Anishinaabe | Illinois | Peoria | Kaskaskia | Miami | Dakota | Ojibwe | Meskwaki | Iowa | Potawatomi | Lenape
Alternate forms: Sioux, Sac and Fox, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1949-1956
Type:Text
Extent: 16 folders; 1 box
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history. Though further research might yield more results, approximately 17 items directly pertaining to the related Algonquian peoples known as the Illinois have been identified. Most of these materials are located in Series IX. Indian Claims, and relate to Wallace's work as a researcher and expert witness on behalf of Native American land claims. They include research note cards (located in Series III. Notecards), research notes and write-ups, copies and extracts of primary sources, court dockets, trial memoranda, tribal histories, and correspondence with historical societies and legal representives of the claimants. There are also materials relating specifically to the Peoria and Kaskaskia peoples of the Illinois, including dockets naming them as claimants, trial memoranda, and research notes. Note that much of Wallace's material on the Illinois also mentions the Miami, Iowa, Sac and Fox (Meskwaki), and other neighboring peoples, and that there is a great deal of overlap in these entries. See also the Louis Rochmes file in Series I. Correspondence. See the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's long and varied career, and for an itemized list of the collection's contents.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)

Anishinaabe | Lenape | Shawnee | Haudenosaunee | Wyandot | Odawa | Miami | Illinois
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape, Odawa
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1951-1953
Type:Text
Extent: 17 folders; 3 boxes
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history. Though further research might yield more results, approximately 20 items directly pertaining to the peoples Wallace called the "Ohio tribes" have been identified. Most of the materials are are located in Series IX. Indian Claims, and relate to Wallace's work as a researcher and expert witness on behalf of Native American land claims. They include copies of and extracts from primary and secondary sources, research notes, tribal histories, court dockets, trial memoranda, and correspondence. There are also research notecards with notes from primary and secondary sources in Series III. Notecards. Series IV. Works by Wallace, A. Professional contains Wallace's Ohio Indians and Six Nations Indian claims reports to lawyers detailing Haudenosaunee, Shawnee, Delaware, Wyandot, Odawa, Miami, and Illinois occupation of Ohio from 1649-1794. In the same series, B. Creative Writing contains a draft of what Wallace called his "Ohio Novel," a fictionalized account of the murder of John Armstrong, Woodworth Arnold, and James Smith by Delawares in 1744 and subsequent events through the Seven Years' War. However, most of the Ohio items pertain to claims to Ohio lands by the Delaware, Shawnee, and Haudenosaunee (formerly Iroquois), and there is overlap with the entries for each of those groups. See the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's long and varied career, and for an itemized list of the collection's contents.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)

Ojibwe | Anishinaabe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Chippewa
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1947-1951
Type:Text
Extent: 7 folders
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's pioneering work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history. See the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's long and varied career, and for an itemized list of the collection's contents. Though further research might yield more results, seven items directly relating to the Ojibwe (called the Chippewa or Ojibwa by Wallace) have been identified. In Series I. Correspondence, there are relevant materials in folders for Nancy Lurie, Seymour Parker, Omer Call Stewart, and Adam Wolf. Two other folders of which relate to Wallace's work as a researcher and expert witness on behalf of Native American land claims. In Series IX. Indian Claims, there is a folder labeled "Chippewa Indians--Red Lake, Pembina and White Earth Bands, and Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, et. al. v. the United States of America" (1951); and an undated folder labeled "Kane, Michal--Chippewa Notes" (Michal Lowenfels Kane was Wallace's research assistant). In Series VIII. University of Pennsylvania, A. Courses, there is a folder titled "Courses Taken--Ojibwa."
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe | Potawatomi | Seneca | Penobscot
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Chippewa
Date: circa 1925-1967, bulk circa 1940-1941
Type:Text
Extent: 32 folders
Description: Several items relating to the Ojibwe (Ojibwa, Chippewa) language have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. They are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II. In Subcollection I, they include relevant correspondence with John N. Seaman (regarding Chippewa fieldwork in Michigan and consultants Mr. Maidler [Medler?] and Charlie David) and a partial letter with Ojibwe text in the Unidentified folder; 6 boxes of Ojibwe notecards, 1 box of Seneca, Ojibwe and Penobscot notecards, and 2 folders of Ojibwe notes (mostly vocabulary and linguistic, but one slip notes addresses of consultants Nicholas Plain of Sarnia and Elijah Pinnance of Walpole Island--there is also, unexpectedly, a bibliography for sources on Arawakan languages at the end of Ojibwa #4) in Series II. comparative vocabularies of Ojibwe and Potawatomi ("Pottowatomi") in Series V. Research Notes Subseries V-A: Language Notes; unbound Eastern Ojibwe texts ("The Walpole Island" and others) in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-B: Text; and 24 folders of Ojibwe notebooks in Series VI. Notebooks. Contents of the Blackfoot and Ojibwe notebooks in this series were described in detail by Richard A. Rhodes in 1988. Blackfoot and Ojibwe notebooks are arranged in the order of Rhodes' list, a photocopy of which is filed in the first Blackfoot folder. In general the Ojibwe notebooks are full of vocabulary words and phrases on all kinds of topics, notes on various parts of speech, notes on dialects, texts both with and without English translations, etc. Several consultants are named, of which Angeline Williams is the most prominent [see Odawa entry for more on Angeline Williams]. At least some of these materials appear to be associated with the Linguistic Institute and might be the work of students. Materials in Subcollection II include correspondence with Leonard Bloomfield (letters written in Ojibwe, with some interlinear English translation) and John N. Seaman (regarding field work with Chippewa speakers in Oscoda, Michigan, including Dan Naganigan and his wife and Mrs. Silas) in Series I. Correspondence. Series II. Research Notes, Subseries III. Macro-Algonquian contains 19 folders of Ojibwe materials collected from Leonard Bloomfield, Angeline Williams, Andrew Medler, Dan Nakanikan and Mrs. John B. Silas, including dozens of texts and stories and Bloomfield's Vocabularies and notes on topics such as prefixes and suffixes and sentence structure [see finding aid for titles of texts and stories]. There are also Ojibwe examples in at least 6 folders ("Č and K," "L and M," "N and P," " Š and T," "Θ and ?" and "Specimens of Central Algonquian") of the many Comparative Algonquian notebooks in the same subseries (i.e., Macro-Algonquian). Finally, there is "Correspondence in Ojibwa: Charles F. Voegelin and Leonard Bloomfield" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries I: General works; and "Ojibwe grammar" by Leonard Bloomfield and "The Chippewa Noun System" by John N. Seaman in Series IV. Works by Others.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe | Seneca | Haudenosaunee | Cree | Naskapi | Innu
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Chippewa, Iroquois
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1927-1949
Type:Text
Extent: 14 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Ojibwe language, history, and culture. Includes 15 pages of Tamagami [Temagami First Nation] myths and five texts in English; 21 pages of Matagama Ojibwe [Mattagami First Nation] notes, including a 2-page phonetic key, a letter from Speck to Samuel (i.e., James) Miller of Gogama requesting ethnographic and map data, 2 maps (one of Mattagami hunting territories), typed reading notes, and a sketch of a play for Mattagama Otcipwe [sic]; a Christmas circular letter telling the story of a Chippewa [Ojibwe] boy returning home for Dance; a copy of Speck's favorable review of Sister Bernard Coleman, "Decorative designs of the Ojibwa of northern Minnesota" [Printed, Speck (1949).]; and a brief popular account on Ojibwe hunting territories by Speck, refuting Roosevelt (1889-1896), who had denied that Indians have a sense of property, along with two pages of notes. Also includes several folders of correspondence, including correspondence with A. I. Hallowell in which Hallowell describes a field trip to the Berens River Saulteaux, Sweet Grass Cree (mentions attitude of Cree to Leonard Bloomfield), and Cold Lake Chipewyan, festivals, etc., and a letter from Speck to Hallowell with pencilled responses of Hallowell to questions asked; letters from D. H. Learmouth, a factor for Hudson's Bay Company at Waswanippi, recounting his experiences in adjudicating Matagama land inheritance and providing ethnographic data sought by Speck from Samuel (i.e., James) Miller of Gogama and data on hunting territories; letters from James E. Holden concerning unsuccessful attempts to purchase baskets at Nipigon; letters from J. Allan Burgesse regarding the Matagama Ojibwe and enclosing a drawing of a "flesher"and a list of hunting territories and biographical information on owners; a letter from Robert Solenberger concerning Tonawanda [Seneca] and Chippewa [Ojibwe] women who make baskets and giving their addresses; a letter from B. W. Thayer concerning Ojibwe beadwork found during a Minnesota field trip; a letter from Henry Woodman discussing the decline of crafts among Bear Island Indians (Temagami); a letter from Prentice Gilbert Downes about the circumboreal region, disucssing his visit to Naskapi near Davis Inlet, to Cree, and to Chippewas, along with 2 pages of notes (Speck?) in French-English, discussing changes in Indian culture; and a letter from Speck to Chief Mitchele Buckshot in Maniwaki, Quebec requesting buckskin and beadwork.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe | Odawa
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Chippewa, Odawa
Language(s): English | Chippewa
Date: Undated
Type:Text
Extent: 3 items
Description: Materials relating to Radin's study of Ojibwe culture and history. Includes a discussion of the origin and spread of the medicine dance; notes from informants and excerpted from published sources: clan names and religion, ceremonial organization, magical rites, magic and witchcraft, war customs, migration tale of the Mississauga, naming and names, lists of personal names with 4 pages, outline of monograph; two outlines for works on Odawa culture and a comparative and contrastive discussion of "The Two Boys" and "Twin Myth"; text of an interview with Jim Pontiac including the description of thirty-two Ojibwe villages of the Upper Peninsula in English or French and Ojibwe; etc.
Collection: Paul Radin papers (Mss.497.3.R114)

Anishinaabe | Odawa
Alternate forms: Odawa
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1951-1952
Type:Text
Extent: 9 folders
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history. Though further research might yield more results, approximately nine items directly pertaining to the Odawa (called Ottawa by Wallace) have been identified. Most of these materials are located in Series IX. Indian Claims, and relate to Wallace's work as a researcher and expert witness on behalf of Native American land claims. They include research notes, tribal histories, court dockets, trial memoranda, and a copy of Robert F. Bauman's "Ottawa, the Huron-Wyandot, and the Land" with several pages of handwritten notes [Robert F. Bauman was a lawyer and historian who specialized for a time as a research historian on Indian claims for a Cleveland law firm and was also briefly director of the Dearborn Historical Museum in the early 1950s.] See also the Omer Call Stewart file in Series I. Correspondence. See the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's long and varied career, and for an itemized list of the collection's contents.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)