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Algonquin | Anishinaabe | Naskapi | Cree | Nipissing | Ojibwe | Rama | Chibcha | Maya | Haudenosaunee | Ktunaxa
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Iroquois, Kutenai
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1912-1941 and undated
Extent: 7 items
Description: Materials relating to both Algonquin and related Algonquian peoples, cultures, and languages. Includes Speck's notes on artifacts found near Lake Abitibi and in the Nipissing district; his Seven Islands field notes, including texts with interlinear translations, house data, names of animals, and a letter in French from Marie Louise Ambroise; abstracts of Speck's published works on the Rama-Chibcha of Nicaragua, River Desert Algonquins, Southern Ontario Indians, Maya, and others; sketches and comments on shoulder blade divination (scapulimancy), including notes on deer drives (including an undated note from A. Irving Hallowell) and the distribution of artifacts among Algonquin, Naskapi, and Mistassini peoples; two field notebooks containing (1) linguistic notes and informant and population data for Waswanipi, Abitibi, Temiskaming [Timiskaming], Nipissing, Algonquian and (2) Temiskaming ethnography, Wisiledjak (Wiskyjack) [Wisakedjak, a manitou] text (in English), Temagami ethnology and texts (in English), and one Iroquois legend; general information on birch-bark containers, including 37 photographs and 40 pages of notes relating to Algonquin, Cree, Ojibwe and Ktunaxa specimens, and a letter from Bella Weitzner; and a letter from A. G. Bailey sending Speck a copy of his book on Algonquians.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Anishinaabe | Blackfoot | Cree | Dakota | Métis | Kainai | Nakoda | Ojibwe | Secwépemc
Alternate forms: Blood, Ojibwa, Saulteaux, Shuswap, Simpcw, Sioux, Stoney
Language(s): English
Date: 1905-1910
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: Norman Leonard Jacobs was an engineer and surveyor with the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway in Canada. The collection consists of his correspondence with Bessie Frank (later Anathan), an acquaintance from Pittsburgh. Jacobs wrote of daily life in Canadian cities like Winnipeg and Edmonton, interactions with First Nations, and daily hardships encountered in the field (extreme cold, snowblindness, and lack of food), but also spoke of his work with pride and enthusiasm. In addition to the letters, Jacobs wrote twenty-eight pages of a "Diary of a Tenderfoot." Also included in the collection are two photobooks and various loose photographs, which display various aspects of camp life, details of work sites and the Canadian landscape, and First Nations peoples. Some of the photographs are extremely faded. Native peoples mentioned include Ojibwe, Blackfoot, Cree, "Surteau" (likely Saulteaux),"Bloods" (Kainai), "Stonies" (Nakoda, or "Stoney"), as well as Native people at Tete Jaune Cache who are likely Simpcw. The images include family groups; men, women, and children fishing; men (some apparently hired by Jacobs or his company to act as guides and carriers in the field) working with an infant in a cradleboard; Ojibwe graves; tepees [tipis]; "Sioux" warriors; a sweat bath; horse races; individuals like Joe KaeKwitch, Chief Handorgan, Chief Wingard, Muskowken, etc. Most of these materials have been digitized and are available through the APS's Digital Library. Also see the finding aid for more background information on Jacobs and detailed itemized lists for both Series I. Correspondence and Series II. Graphic Materials.
Collection: Anathan-Jacobs Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Collection (Mss.SMs.Coll.13)

A'aninin | Anishinaabe | Apache | Apache, Plains | Apache, Western | Arapaho | Arikara | Assiniboine | Blackfoot | Caddo | Catawba | Cayuga | Cherokee | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Comanche | Creek | Crow | Lenape | Flathead | Haudenosaunee | Ho-Chunk | Hopi | Houma | Iñupiat | Iowa | Isleta | Kaw | Kickapoo | Laguna | Lakota | Mandan | Menominee | Meskwaki | Munsee | Nez Perce | Ojibwe | Omaha | Oneida | Otoe | Odawa | Penobscot | Pawnee | Ponca | Potawatomi | Quapaw | Seminole | Seneca | Shawnee | Shoshone | Stockbridge-Munsee | Tsimshian | Wabanaki | Wichita | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Arapahoe, Chippewa, Eskimo, Gros Ventre, Iroquois, Kansa, Lenape, Muscogee, Niimíipu, Odawa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Salish, Sioux, Sac-and-Fox, Sauk-and-Fox, Winnebago, Wyandotte
Language(s): English
Date: 1939-1943
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: There are a few items in the Frank G. Speck Papers currently identified as relating to Indian boarding schools.In the collection guide, under Subcollection 1, Series 1, in Section IV, "Southeast," see item IV(15H3), "Yuchi miscellaneous notes," which contains a letter from Ann Rolland (Haskell Institute), to Speck, April 6, 1941, as well as items under "C. Houma (Louisiana)" that relate to mission schools. In Section XIII, "Miscellaneous," see item XIII(22H), "Haskell Institute Roster," which lists of Native students and the Haskell Institute boarding school in 1939-1940, giving name, age, address, and tribe. (The tribes of the students included are listed above in this entry.) In Subcollection I, Series II, Biographical Material, see letters (listed alphabetically by author) from Leona E. Giger and Ann Rolland, both students at Haskell in the early 1940s. Also see letter from "Redge" and Gladys Laulin regarding Chippewa boy returning home for dances. In Series III, Photographs, there is an undated photograph [#10-14(a)] from the Shingwauk Indian Residential School. See also school-related photos in folders "Creek #3," "Eskimo [Inuit] (Labrador) #4," "Houma #1," #2, #7, and #8, "Pamunkey #6," and "Penobscot: People #2." In Series IV, Lantern Slides, there are slides of Native and Black students at the Hampton Institute. More boarding school-related material may be identified in the collection with further research.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Anishinaabe | Hawaiian | Potawatomi | Paiute | Cheyenne | Dakota | Arapaho | Kiowa
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1942-1968
Description: There are many items relating to Indigenous American languages in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. This entry is intended as a catch-all for materials that cover Indigenous American languages in general and might not show up in narrower searches. Researchers should also view the entries for specific languages and regions. For this more general category, there is relevant material in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II. In Subcollection I, there are 7 folders relating to Voegelin's intended publication "American Indian Language" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries III-B: Works Authored by Voegelin [see also the associated material in Oversized]. Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-C: Other contains one file on inscribed stones and the Dene syllabary system and another on the Summer Linguistic Institute (in which many Native North American languages are mentioned). There are also two images of a stone inscribed with what were supposed to be Potawatomi petroglyphs in Series VII. Photographs. Also in Series VII are several language maps (i.e., "Indian language groups in the state of Illinois" and "American Indian Languages"), in which Algonquian languages are particularly well-represented. In Subcollection II, there is relevant correspondence with Wallace Chafe (regarding a census of speakers of indigenous languages), Kenneth Croft (regarding the state of American language work in Mexico, the use of mechanical recording equipment, Cheyenne materials, etc.), Samuel H. Elbert (regarding place names in Hawaii, comparison with Oceania and North America), Dell Hymes (regarding Anthropological Lingustics), Vernon E. Jake (regarding proposed language speaker census, particularly how to discern whether children really know the language), Luis S. Kemnitzer (a thank-you note in which Voegelin revealingly acknowledges, "Although I once worked with the Dakota language, I know little of its culture."), Jerome Kirk (a thank you known in which Voegelin asserts, "I've never found any speaker among the twenty American Indian languages I've worked with who got them [directional terms] straight."), and Morris Swadesh (many languages). Also in Subcollection II, there is a file of notes on classification of North American languages in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries XI. General; some "Ungrouped Tales," two folders with stories about Pechiha (Kickapoo?) and Yellow Horse (Arapaho?) attributed to Joe Pierce and Bruno Nettl, respectively, and a folder on sources in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries II. American Indian Tales for Children; and drafts, linguistic notes and maps in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries V. American Indian Languages.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Saulteaux
Date: 1932-1949
Description: The Ojibwe materials in the A. Irving Hallowell Papers are extensive. Hallowell focused on three regions of Ojibwe territory: Berens River in north, central Canada (Pikangikum, Pauingassi, Poplar River; Little Grand Rapids First Nations) and Lac du Flambeau in Wisconsin. Hallowell was particularly interested in psychological anthropology. Both the Berens River and Lac du Flambeau materials in Series V, for example, includes ethnographic information on taboos, incest regulations, Rorschach tests, dreams, and acculturation. Hallowell's interests in traditional knowledge are represented by descriptions of the practice of the Midewiwin religion; traditional stories about Wisakedjak and Tcakabec/Chakabesh, Memegwesiug, Windigos, and Thunderbirds. Of particular interest in the Lac du Flambeau materials are hundred of pages of family biographies in Series V and photographs with the names of community members in Series VI, Subseries B. Of particular interest in the Berens River materials are maps of traditional hunting grounds, a diagram of Ojibwe cosmology, an autobiography by Hallowell's collaborator Chief William Berens, 29 folders of "Saulteaux Indians--Myths and Tales" all in Series V. There are hundreds of photographs from the region, with many community members identified, and all digitized, in Series VI, Subseries A. The correspondence, in Series I, includes Robert Ritzenhaler's description of a shaking tent ceremony by Ojibwe in Wisconsin; a detailed account of Joseph Fiddler's trial for murdering a windigo in the folder labled Royal Canadian Mounted Police; papers sent by Morton Teicher detailing incidents of windigo in Canada (50+ pages); a letter from Frances Densmore describing a shaking tent ceremony; and several letters from Chief William Berens providing information about Ojibwe people in the photographs in Series VI.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Saulteaux
Date: 1955-2011 (bulk 1992-2011)
Extent: 350+ hours; 2500+ photographs; 100+ documents
Description: Audio recordings, photographs, and born-digital manuscripts documenting Ojibwe communities and individuals primarily in Manitoba and Ontario, with a smaller number from Minnesota and Wisconsin. Subject matter includes the photographs and ethnography of A. Irving Hallowell in these communities in the 1930s, thunderbirds, memegwesiwag, Ojibwe language, religion, ceremonies, and other traditions. The main communities concerned are Berens River, Pauingassi, Little Grand Rapids, Pikangikum, Poplar Hill, and Jackhead. The majority of the audio materials are interviews recorded in the context of producing radio documentaries for CBC Radio One from the early 1990s through late 2000s. (See Series I, Subseries 12 for the broadcast version of these documentaries.) Transcripts for both the finished documentaries and some of the interviews are located in Series II. Photographs taken during Matthews' visits to indigenous communities, museums, and other locations can be found in Series III.
Collection: Maureen Matthews Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.164)

Anishinaabe | Odawa | Potawatomi | Meskwaki | Kickapoo | Iowa
Alternate forms: Odawa, Ioway, Chiwere
Language(s): English
Date: 1948
Genre: Maps | Photographs
Description: The Ottawa materials in the Snyderman Papers include an undated map showing Native American settlemements in Illinois in Series II. Photographs in Series V include images of Chief Ettawageshik.
Collection: George S. Snyderman Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.51)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe | Odawa
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway
Language(s): English | Ottawa
Date: 1926 and undated
Description: Materials relating to Radin's study of Odawa culture and history, with some Ojibwe material as well. Several items are headed "Ojibwa-Ottawa notes," though it is unclear from the descriptions provided what might be Odawa and what might be Ojibwe. Topics include Midewewin, religion, war and warfare, medicine and magic, death and burial, life cycle, games, ceremonialism, social organization, disease, dreams, and material culture. Items include a Nanabojo text concerning White Feather; ethnographic notes from published sources; 23 pages of male and female names; photographs (1926) with explanatory notes; typed slips and field notes on slips, most of them later transcribed for typed slips; and a 1-page letter signed Ake Sulkrantz and dated Stockholm, December 2, 1950. Two items are of particular note: 1) an unfinished manuscript relating 20 dreams of Miskwanda and 10 of Jim Pontiac, together with analysis. Chapters on legend and fact in the history of L'Arbre Croche and an ethnohistoric account based on the Jesuit Relations. Not included is a proposed account of "The culture of L'Arbre Croche as illustrated by Miskwanda's drawings." Interesting narrative of Radin's field work and methods and 2) 154 original drawings by Miskwanda--traced, arranged and commented on by Radin--intended to illustrate culture of L'Arbre Croche.
Collection: Paul Radin papers (Mss.497.3.R114)

Anishinaabe | Potawatomi
Alternate forms: Pottawotomi
Language(s): English | Potawatomi
Date: circa 1925-1967
Extent: 6 folders
Description: The C. F. Voegelin Papers contain notes, notebooks, stories, photographs, and other linguistic and ethnographic materials relating to Potawatomi (Pottowatomi) language and culture. These are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II of the Voegelin Papers. Materials in Subcollection I include relevant correspondence with Eli Lilly (regarding the discovery of inscribed stones and their possible meaning; see photographs referenced below) in Series I. Correspondence; a folder of Ojibwa [Ojibwe] and Pottowatomi [Potawatomi] comparative vocabularies in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-A: Language Notes; a folder of three undated "Pottowatomi" notebooks containing texts (with some English translation) and mentioning consultants Smallman Isaac, William George, and William Soney in Series VI. Notebooks; and two images of stones inscribed with Potawatomi petroglyphs, from Elkhart, Indiana, in Series VII. Photographs. These images have been digitized and are available through the APS's Digital Library. In Subcollection II, there are Potawatomi stories in the Eastern Woodland category in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries II: American Indian Tales for Children.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)