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Algonquin | Anishinaabe | Naskapi | Cree | Nipissing | Ojibwe | Rama | Chibcha | Maya | Haudenosaunee | Ktunaxa
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Iroquois, Kutenai
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1912-1941 and undated
Extent: 7 items
Description: Materials relating to both Algonquin and related Algonquian peoples, cultures, and languages. Includes Speck's notes on artifacts found near Lake Abitibi and in the Nipissing district; his Seven Islands field notes, including texts with interlinear translations, house data, names of animals, and a letter in French from Marie Louise Ambroise; abstracts of Speck's published works on the Rama-Chibcha of Nicaragua, River Desert Algonquins, Southern Ontario Indians, Maya, and others; sketches and comments on shoulder blade divination (scapulimancy), including notes on deer drives (including an undated note from A. Irving Hallowell) and the distribution of artifacts among Algonquin, Naskapi, and Mistassini peoples; two field notebooks containing (1) linguistic notes and informant and population data for Waswanipi, Abitibi, Temiskaming [Timiskaming], Nipissing, Algonquian and (2) Temiskaming ethnography, Wisiledjak (Wiskyjack) [Wisakedjak, a manitou] text (in English), Temagami ethnology and texts (in English), and one Iroquois legend; general information on birch-bark containers, including 37 photographs and 40 pages of notes relating to Algonquin, Cree, Ojibwe and Ktunaxa specimens, and a letter from Bella Weitzner; and a letter from A. G. Bailey sending Speck a copy of his book on Algonquians.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Anishinaabe | Blackfoot | Cree | Dakota | Métis | Kainai | Nakoda | Ojibwe | Secwépemc
Alternate forms: Blood, Ojibwa, Saulteaux, Shuswap, Simpcw, Sioux, Stoney
Language(s): English
Date: 1905-1910
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: Norman Leonard Jacobs was an engineer and surveyor with the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway in Canada. The collection consists of his correspondence with Bessie Frank (later Anathan), an acquaintance from Pittsburgh. Jacobs wrote of daily life in Canadian cities like Winnipeg and Edmonton, interactions with First Nations, and daily hardships encountered in the field (extreme cold, snowblindness, and lack of food), but also spoke of his work with pride and enthusiasm. In addition to the letters, Jacobs wrote twenty-eight pages of a "Diary of a Tenderfoot." Also included in the collection are two photobooks and various loose photographs, which display various aspects of camp life, details of work sites and the Canadian landscape, and First Nations peoples. Some of the photographs are extremely faded. Native peoples mentioned include Ojibwe, Blackfoot, Cree, "Surteau" (likely Saulteaux),"Bloods" (Kainai), "Stonies" (Nakoda, or "Stoney"), as well as Native people at Tete Jaune Cache who are likely Simpcw. The images include family groups; men, women, and children fishing; men (some apparently hired by Jacobs or his company to act as guides and carriers in the field) working with an infant in a cradleboard; Ojibwe graves; tepees [tipis]; "Sioux" warriors; a sweat bath; horse races; individuals like Joe KaeKwitch, Chief Handorgan, Chief Wingard, Muskowken, etc. Most of these materials have been digitized and are available through the APS's Digital Library. Also see the finding aid for more background information on Jacobs and detailed itemized lists for both Series I. Correspondence and Series II. Graphic Materials.
Collection: Anathan-Jacobs Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Collection (Mss.SMs.Coll.13)

A'aninin | Anishinaabe | Apache | Apache, Plains | Apache, Western | Arapaho | Arikara | Assiniboine | Blackfoot | Caddo | Catawba | Cayuga | Cherokee | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Comanche | Creek | Crow | Lenape | Flathead | Haudenosaunee | Ho-Chunk | Hopi | Houma | Iñupiat | Iowa | Isleta | Kaw | Kickapoo | Laguna | Lakota | Mandan | Menominee | Meskwaki | Munsee | Nez Perce | Ojibwe | Omaha | Oneida | Otoe | Odawa | Penobscot | Pawnee | Ponca | Potawatomi | Quapaw | Seminole | Seneca | Shawnee | Shoshone | Stockbridge-Munsee | Tsimshian | Wabanaki | Wichita | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Arapahoe, Chippewa, Eskimo, Gros Ventre, Iroquois, Kansa, Lenape, Muscogee, Niimíipu, Odawa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Salish, Sioux, Sac-and-Fox, Sauk-and-Fox, Winnebago, Wyandotte
Language(s): English
Date: 1939-1943
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: There are a few items in the Frank G. Speck Papers currently identified as relating to Indian boarding schools.In the collection guide, under Subcollection 1, Series 1, in Section IV, "Southeast," see item IV(15H3), "Yuchi miscellaneous notes," which contains a letter from Ann Rolland (Haskell Institute), to Speck, April 6, 1941, as well as items under "C. Houma (Louisiana)" that relate to mission schools. In Section XIII, "Miscellaneous," see item XIII(22H), "Haskell Institute Roster," which lists of Native students and the Haskell Institute boarding school in 1939-1940, giving name, age, address, and tribe. (The tribes of the students included are listed above in this entry.) In Subcollection I, Series II, Biographical Material, see letters (listed alphabetically by author) from Leona E. Giger and Ann Rolland, both students at Haskell in the early 1940s. Also see letter from "Redge" and Gladys Laulin regarding Chippewa boy returning home for dances. In Series III, Photographs, there is an undated photograph [#10-14(a)] from the Shingwauk Indian Residential School. See also school-related photos in folders "Creek #3," "Eskimo [Inuit] (Labrador) #4," "Houma #1," #2, #7, and #8, "Pamunkey #6," and "Penobscot: People #2." In Series IV, Lantern Slides, there are slides of Native and Black students at the Hampton Institute. More boarding school-related material may be identified in the collection with further research.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Anishinaabe | Mohawk | Odawa | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Odawa
Language(s): English
Date: 1754-1757
Type:Text
Extent: 3 items
Description: Letters to Governors Denny and Morris regarding rumors about French and Indian movements; arrival of 400 French, 200 Conawagas [Kahnawakes, or Mohawks], and Ottoways [Odawas] ready to move; 1,100 French and 70 Arondacks at French Fort on Monongahela. Trader and former captive John Patten's statement that the French keep Native women and children in forts while the men are hunting, and offer fine camping grounds.
Collection: Indian and Military Affairs of Pennsylvania, 1737-1775 (Mss.974.8.P19)

Anishinaabe | Hawaiian | Potawatomi | Paiute | Cheyenne | Dakota | Arapaho | Kiowa
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1942-1968
Description: There are many items relating to Indigenous American languages in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. This entry is intended as a catch-all for materials that cover Indigenous American languages in general and might not show up in narrower searches. Researchers should also view the entries for specific languages and regions. For this more general category, there is relevant material in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II. In Subcollection I, there are 7 folders relating to Voegelin's intended publication "American Indian Language" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries III-B: Works Authored by Voegelin [see also the associated material in Oversized]. Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-C: Other contains one file on inscribed stones and the Dene syllabary system and another on the Summer Linguistic Institute (in which many Native North American languages are mentioned). There are also two images of a stone inscribed with what were supposed to be Potawatomi petroglyphs in Series VII. Photographs. Also in Series VII are several language maps (i.e., "Indian language groups in the state of Illinois" and "American Indian Languages"), in which Algonquian languages are particularly well-represented. In Subcollection II, there is relevant correspondence with Wallace Chafe (regarding a census of speakers of indigenous languages), Kenneth Croft (regarding the state of American language work in Mexico, the use of mechanical recording equipment, Cheyenne materials, etc.), Samuel H. Elbert (regarding place names in Hawaii, comparison with Oceania and North America), Dell Hymes (regarding Anthropological Lingustics), Vernon E. Jake (regarding proposed language speaker census, particularly how to discern whether children really know the language), Luis S. Kemnitzer (a thank-you note in which Voegelin revealingly acknowledges, "Although I once worked with the Dakota language, I know little of its culture."), Jerome Kirk (a thank you known in which Voegelin asserts, "I've never found any speaker among the twenty American Indian languages I've worked with who got them [directional terms] straight."), and Morris Swadesh (many languages). Also in Subcollection II, there is a file of notes on classification of North American languages in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries XI. General; some "Ungrouped Tales," two folders with stories about Pechiha (Kickapoo?) and Yellow Horse (Arapaho?) attributed to Joe Pierce and Bruno Nettl, respectively, and a folder on sources in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries II. American Indian Tales for Children; and drafts, linguistic notes and maps in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries V. American Indian Languages.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Anishinaabe | Haudenosaunee | Oneida | Mohawk | Seneca | Shawnee | Miami | Odawa
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Odawa
Language(s): English
Date: 1749-1759
Type:Text
Extent: 19 items
Description: Various items relating to Haudenosaunee-Pennsylvania relations, largely in the 1750s. Topics include need for colonial governments to renew the covenant chain; death of Tanaghrisson (Seneca, also called the Half King) suspected to be witchcraft; the diplomatic work of Scarroyady (Oneida, also called Monacatootha and the Half King), especially as a go-between between the Six Nations and Pennsylvania; the Albany Plan of Union; a conference with Caughnawagas [Kahnawakes] and negotiations for the redemption of an Indian held prisoner by the Caughnawagas; drunken conduct of Andrew Montour; Conrad Weiser's dealings with the family of Shickellamy (Oneida); John Lidieus's purchase of Susquehanna lands from the Six Nations for Connecticut; George Croghan's meeting at Logstown with Six Nations and Shawnees; a document prepared for Governor Hamilton listing events, letters, resolutions, and behavior of Miamis and other Indians toward Six Nations, Ohio lands, etc.; 1754 appointment of John Penn, Richard Peters, Benjamin Franklin as Commissioners of Pennsylvania to a list of Six Nations Indians present at the 1758 Treaty of Easton; and Christian Frederick Post on Indian character.
Collection: Indian and Military Affairs of Pennsylvania, 1737-1775 (Mss.974.8.P19)

Anishinaabe | Illinois | Peoria | Kaskaskia | Miami | Dakota | Ojibwe | Meskwaki | Iowa | Potawatomi | Lenape
Alternate forms: Sioux, Sac and Fox, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1949-1956
Type:Text
Extent: 16 folders; 1 box
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history. Though further research might yield more results, approximately 17 items directly pertaining to the related Algonquian peoples known as the Illinois have been identified. Most of these materials are located in Series IX. Indian Claims, and relate to Wallace's work as a researcher and expert witness on behalf of Native American land claims. They include research note cards (located in Series III. Notecards), research notes and write-ups, copies and extracts of primary sources, court dockets, trial memoranda, tribal histories, and correspondence with historical societies and legal representives of the claimants. There are also materials relating specifically to the Peoria and Kaskaskia peoples of the Illinois, including dockets naming them as claimants, trial memoranda, and research notes. Note that much of Wallace's material on the Illinois also mentions the Miami, Iowa, Sac and Fox (Meskwaki), and other neighboring peoples, and that there is a great deal of overlap in these entries. See also the Louis Rochmes file in Series I. Correspondence. See the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's long and varied career, and for an itemized list of the collection's contents.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)

Anishinaabe | Lenape | Shawnee | Haudenosaunee | Wyandot | Odawa | Miami | Illinois
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape, Odawa
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1951-1953
Type:Text
Extent: 17 folders; 3 boxes
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history. Though further research might yield more results, approximately 20 items directly pertaining to the peoples Wallace called the "Ohio tribes" have been identified. Most of the materials are are located in Series IX. Indian Claims, and relate to Wallace's work as a researcher and expert witness on behalf of Native American land claims. They include copies of and extracts from primary and secondary sources, research notes, tribal histories, court dockets, trial memoranda, and correspondence. There are also research notecards with notes from primary and secondary sources in Series III. Notecards. Series IV. Works by Wallace, A. Professional contains Wallace's Ohio Indians and Six Nations Indian claims reports to lawyers detailing Haudenosaunee, Shawnee, Delaware, Wyandot, Odawa, Miami, and Illinois occupation of Ohio from 1649-1794. In the same series, B. Creative Writing contains a draft of what Wallace called his "Ohio Novel," a fictionalized account of the murder of John Armstrong, Woodworth Arnold, and James Smith by Delawares in 1744 and subsequent events through the Seven Years' War. However, most of the Ohio items pertain to claims to Ohio lands by the Delaware, Shawnee, and Haudenosaunee (formerly Iroquois), and there is overlap with the entries for each of those groups. See the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's long and varied career, and for an itemized list of the collection's contents.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe | Cree
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Chippewa, Nehiyaw
Date: 1970s
Type:Text
Extent: 1.5 linear feet
Description: After finishing his PhD, Daythal Kendall accepting a position at Brandon University, Manitoba to teach local varieties of Cree and Ojibwe, as a temporary replacement for Paul Voorhis. He therefore possessed a large number of Paul Voorhis' Cree publications (Series 5), and during this time produced a large volume of lessons to teach Canadian Aboriginal syllabics. These are in various forms in Series 3, including students' exercises. There is also correspondence relating to this period with Paul Voorhis and Katherine Merriam, as well as a separate conversation relating to American Philosophical Society materials (Series 1)
Collection: Daythal L. Kendall Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.148)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Saulteaux
Date: 1932-1949
Description: The Ojibwe materials in the A. Irving Hallowell Papers are extensive. Hallowell focused on three regions of Ojibwe territory: Berens River in north, central Canada (Pikangikum, Pauingassi, Poplar River; Little Grand Rapids First Nations) and Lac du Flambeau in Wisconsin. Hallowell was particularly interested in psychological anthropology. Both the Berens River and Lac du Flambeau materials in Series V, for example, includes ethnographic information on taboos, incest regulations, Rorschach tests, dreams, and acculturation. Hallowell's interests in traditional knowledge are represented by descriptions of the practice of the Midewiwin religion; traditional stories about Wisakedjak and Tcakabec/Chakabesh, Memegwesiug, Windigos, and Thunderbirds. Of particular interest in the Lac du Flambeau materials are hundred of pages of family biographies in Series V and photographs with the names of community members in Series VI, Subseries B. Of particular interest in the Berens River materials are maps of traditional hunting grounds, a diagram of Ojibwe cosmology, an autobiography by Hallowell's collaborator Chief William Berens, 29 folders of "Saulteaux Indians--Myths and Tales" all in Series V. There are hundreds of photographs from the region, with many community members identified, and all digitized, in Series VI, Subseries A. The correspondence, in Series I, includes Robert Ritzenhaler's description of a shaking tent ceremony by Ojibwe in Wisconsin; a detailed account of Joseph Fiddler's trial for murdering a windigo in the folder labled Royal Canadian Mounted Police; papers sent by Morton Teicher detailing incidents of windigo in Canada (50+ pages); a letter from Frances Densmore describing a shaking tent ceremony; and several letters from Chief William Berens providing information about Ojibwe people in the photographs in Series VI.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)