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Alabama | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Koasati
Alternate forms: Alibamu, Coushatta
Date: 1934-1982
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas worked for a short period to document Alabama with several speakers on in the 1930s. The field notebook is in Series 2 Subseries ‘Multiple Languages' and includes comparisons with Koasati and Choctaw. Around 585 lexical items were obtained from this fieldwork, from which lexical slip files (Series 9) are derived. Haas also utilized John R. Swanton's dictionary of Alabama, and Alabama forms part of extensive Muskogean language comparisons, mostly in Series 2. There is also brief correspondence.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Calusa | Seminole | Catawba
Language(s): English
Date: 1923-1924
Type:Text
Extent: 1 folder
Description: This folder, Section IV(15J2a), "Seminole--Notes on Calusa," contains 9 items relating to the Calusa people of Florida. Materials include an account of the Seminoles and their mixed past; a discussion of the Siouan origin of South Carolina native Francisco de Chicora's terms [Francisco de Chicora was the baptismal name given to an indigenous man captured by Spaniards near the Pee Dee River in 1521. Swanton argued that the man was Catawba, which is a Siouan language.]; a letter from H. Knotts concerning Muscogee and letters from John R. Swanton concerning Speck's trip to Florida with Fewkes, Cusabo-Muskhogean-Siouan boundaries, and Speck as aid to Fewkes in locating Calusa remnants among the Seminoles.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Catawba | Houma | Pamunkey | Cheraw | Yuchi | Cherokee | Innu | Naskapi | Dakota | Wateree | Creek | Shawnee | Haudenosaunee | Tutelo | Powhatan
Alternate forms: Montagnais-Naskapi, Sioux, Iroquois
Language(s): English | Catawba
Date: 1914-1947
Type:Text
Extent: 21 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Catawba history, language, and culture. This includes Speck's correspondence with indigenous consultants such as Red Thunder Cloud, Chief Sam Blue, and Leola Blue (Catawba) and Will West Long and Climbing Bear (Cherokee); correspondence with other anthropologists and linguists, such as John Reed Swanton, William N. Fenton, Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, C.F. Voegelin, Morris Swadesh, A. I. Hallowell, Mary Haas, and others; genealogies of twentieth-century Catawba consultants; a Catawba bibliography; notes on topics including Catawba division of time, travel and expedition, food resources, racial status in the South, and notes, possibly for a lecture, titled "The Catawba-A Small Nation Deflated"; a University of Pennsylvania student's essay on Catawba tribal correspondence with J. Walter Fewkes about Speck's Catawba field trips; field notebooks devoted to ethnologic notes, vocabulary, texts, songs, and other linguistic and cultural data; and collections of notes devoted to Catawba language and texts, general ethnological notes, and miscellaneous notes. Some of the notes and notebooks and much of the correspondence mentions other indigenous groups as well.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Chitimacha
Language(s): Chitimacha | English
Date: 1930-1935, 1939, 1950
Type:Text
Extent: 5,000 slips, 1,546 pages
Description: The Chitimacha materials in the ACLS collection consists of an extensive body of materials recorded by Morris Swadesh. These are located in the "Chitimacha" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing. Noteworthy materials include Swadesh's field notebooks, containing text (on a variety of topics) with interlinear translations, and extensive linguistic analysis of morphology, grammar, and other areas. These also include a brief genealogy. Also in this section are additional texts, and linguistic materials created from the fieldwork materials, such as a draft Chitimacha-English dictionary and a lexical file of over 4000 word slips. See also the single notebook in the "Koasati" section of the finding aid, which contains a French-English-Chitimacha wordlist from Mrs. Sadie Dardin.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Haida
Language(s): English | Haida | Tlingit
Date: 1890, 1893, 1900-1911, 1915
Type:Text
Extent: 3000+ pages, 1400+ cards, 3 notebooks
Description: The Haida material in the ACLS collection consists of numerous materials that are primarily located in the "Haida" section of the finding aid. See this section for a complete listing. Prominent materials in this section includes Swanton's typescript draft versions of Haida stories from both Masset and Skidegate, recorded in 1900-1902. These versions are in Haida only, with some handwritten annotations, corrections, and English titles. Many were published, though not all. Notably, these manuscript include the Haida version of stories published in English only in Swanton's "Haida Texts and Myths--Skidegate dialect." Also included in this section are lexical files by Boas and Sapir derived from Boas and Swanton's materials. In the "Athapaskan" section of the finding aid, see Sapir's "Comparative Na-Dene dictionary," which includes extensive Haida material. In the "Chinook" section of the finding aid, see Boas' "Field notes on Chinookan and Salishan languages and Gitamat, Molala, and Masset," which includes vocabularies recorded in 1890, likely in Victoria, from a Haida speaker from Masset. In the "Tlingit" section of the finding aid, see Swanton's "Tlingit and Haida word list," including Haida vocabulary recorded at Howkan, Klinkwan, and Kassan.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Houma | Creek | Tohono O'odham | Akimel O'odham | Lenape
Alternate forms: Papago, Pima, Munsee
Language(s): English
Date: 1929-1947
Extent: 11 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Houma history and culture. Includes correspondence with Houma consultants such as members of the Billiot family, Ann Celestine, Dorothy Celestine, and Ben Paul about topics including museum specimens (a pirogue, beaded belts, baskets, blow guns, etc.), land questions, and schooling problems; correspondence with government officials and academic colleagues including Willard Beatty, William Zimmerman, Joseph McCaskill, Alice Marriott, and John Reed Swanton, and others regarding Speck's field work, various aspects of his research, and the social and economic conditions of the Houma people; a draft and copy of Speck's "Report...on Houma Indians" prepared for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, concerning the history and condition of the Houma and their educational needs; notes and correspondence regarding Houma medicine and traps; and Houma specimens consisting of six bone and wood points for canoe arrows and a model of canoe with two paddles.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

A'wa'etłala | K'ómoks | Da'naxda'xw | Dzawada'enuxw | Gopinuxw | Gusgimukw | Gwa'sala | Gwatsinuxw | Gwawa'enuxw | Kwakwaka'wakw | Kwagu'ł | Kwikwasutinuxw | Ławitsis | Lekwiltok | Ma'a̱mtagila | Mamalilikala | Nak'waxda'xw | Namgis | Tłatłasikwala | Wiwekam | Wiweqayi
Alternate forms: Gwasilla, Gwawaenuk, K'omoks, Koskimo, Kwakiutl, Kwicksutaineuk, Laich-kwil-tach, Nakoaktok, Nakwoktak, Nimpkish, Quatsino, Tanakteuk, Tlowitsis, Tsawataineuk, Weiwaikai, Weiwaikum
Language(s): English | German | Kwak'wala
Date: 1885-1942
Type:Text
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: This collection contains the bulk of correspondence between Franz Boas and his professional colleagues, though there are also other Boas collections in the library. The correspondents listed above contain some correspondence related to the culture or language listed in this entry. The largest correspondence is that of George Hunt, which took place from 1894-1933 and runs around 1000 pages. A full index for this correspondence is available upon request, and includes cross references to the locations (in other APS collections) of fieldwork and other materials referred to in the letters. Other correspondences primarily about Kwakwaka'wakw matters are that of the Cadwalladers, Dan Cranmer, John Fillmore (concerning the transcription of Boas' cylinder recordings of Kwakiutl songs), Alfred I. Hall, and C. J. Nowell. In the finding aid listings for some of these correspondents, the individual letters pertaining to this culture or language will be identified by a subject heading, though for some correspondents this indexing has not yet been completed. Some letters may contain only brief mentions of work being conducted in relation to the topic. Some additional correspondences in this collection that have not yet been indexed may also contain additional material.
Collection: Franz Boas Papers (Mss.B.B61)

Muscogee | Seminole | Yuchi
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): English | Muscogee | Yuchi
Date: 1904-1947
Extent: 14 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Creek history, language, and culture. Includes Speck's own notes and work, including "Notes on Social and Economic Conditions Among the Creek Indians of Alabama in 1941" (published as Speck 1947); an undated earlier version of that essay titled "Creek Indians Surviving in Alabama"; 115 pages of linguistic notes from Taskigitown, dated 1904-1905 and organized by categories; Creek and Yuchi songs; Creek and Yuchi Dance; 98 pages of Creek texts, including some interlineal translations, and related notes dated 1904-1905; and 35 pages of miscellaneous notes and letters on topics like dances, language, clothing, myths, handicrafts, and fieldwork. Also includes two botanical specimens--Coopti (Zamia floridana) used by Seminoles, 1941 and Ilex vomitoria Ait, used by Creeks--accompanied by letters to Speck from Richard Evans Schultes concerning Houma Botany; two letters from female students at the Haskell Institute in 1940 (Leona Giger writes of a Creek doll she is making and mentions the council house at Okmulgee, Oklahoma, while Ann Rolland offers to answer questions on Creek use of feathers); a letter from Morris Opler regarding Opler's work among the Creeks, as well as an essay by Opler about the organization, history, and social and political significance of Creek towns; a letter from Mario Gamio acknowledging the receipt of a Creek Indian pamphlet; and a letter from D'Arcy McNickle returning to Speck photographs of the Creek Indians of Atmore, Alabama to prevent them from getting lost and mentioning that his manuscript of the report is still being copied.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Powhatan
Language(s): English | Powhatan
Date: 1907-1947
Type:Text
Genre: Essays
Description: The Powhatan materials in the Siebert Papers consist solely of secondary sources in Series IV and VII. With the exception of an ethnohistory article by James Mooney, the materials are related to Powhatan linguistics.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Tunica | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Alabama | Koasati | Natchez | Atakapa | Chitimacha | Avoyelles | Timucua
Alternate forms: Coushatta, Avoyel
Date: ca.1933-1960s
Extent: 3 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas conducted extensive fieldwork on Tunica with last speaker Sesostrie Youchigant, subsequently publishing a grammar as her PhD dissertation, and later texts and a dictionary. Fourteen field notebooks can be found in the dedicated subseries in Series 2, along with abundant grammatical and lexical notes and sheet music. Tunica was an integral part of Haas' comparative work on the Gulf hypothesis, so extensive comparisons can be found, especially in the lexical slip files of Series 9. Haas' Tunica work also contains more ethnographic notes than most of her files. Photographs of Sesostrie Youchigant are present in Series 11 and can be viewed at the Digital Library.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)