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Aymara | Quechua
Language(s): English | Aymara | Spanish
Date: 1950-1972
Description: The Aymara materials in the Lounsbury Papers consist of comparative linguistics and studies of kinship in Series II. Of particular interest are the audio recordings in Series VII on the folklore of the Ayar Incas. The correspondence, in Series I, contains information of the geographic distribution of the language, Lounsbury's analysis of the language and its relationship to Quechua, Christian scriptures in Aymara, Morris Swadesh's work on genetic classification of Native American languages, and geographic distribution of Aymara population.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Chitimacha | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Alabama | Koasati | Natchez | Tunica | Atakapa
Alternate forms: Coushatta
Date: 1936, undated
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas did not conduct her own fieldwork on Chitimacha, but amassed sizeable lexica from Morris Swadesh, mostly used for comparisons with Muskogean languages and linguistic isolates under the “Gulf” hypothesis. One especially large instance of comparison involving Chitimacha is an 1821-word long English-Natchez-Chitimacha word list, partially filled, in Series 2 Subseries Natchez. The majority of the comparative lexica are slip files, in Series 9. Besides this, of particular interest is sheet music of several Chitimacha songs, untitled, from an unknown source, in Series 2 Subseries Chitimacha. Haas also published an article on clans and kinship terminology with Natchez comparisons, notes and discussions of which are in Series 4 Subseries 3.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Kickapoo
Alternate forms: Kikapú
Language(s): English | Kickapoo | Spanish
Date: 1940
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 237 pages
Description: The Kickapoo materials in the ACLS collection consist of two items. The first is a brief vocabulary in the "Kickapoo" section of the finding aid that was recorded by Morris Swadesh in Mexico in 1940. The other item is Joe Pierce's "Shawnee, Kickapoo, Ojibwa, Sauk-and-Fox materials" located in the "Ojibwa" section of the finding aid, which consists of linguistic materials and analysis comparing these languages.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Mixtec
Date: 1916; 1922; 1940
Type:Text
Extent: 41 pages, 300 cards
Description: The Mixtec materials in the ACLS collection consist mainly of three items in the "Mixtec" section of the finding aid. Radin's "Mixtec and Chinantec lexicon" is based on his own field work (found in the Paul Radin papers, listed separately in this guide) and other published work by Belmar. There is also an analysis of Mixtec tones and those of other neighboring language families by Jaime de Angulo, and a Spanish-Mixtec vocabulary assembled by McQuown and Swadesh. In the “Mexico” section of the finding aid, see “Comparative vocabularies of various Indian languages of Mexico,” which includes Mixtec vocabulary, and McQuown's “Phonemic systems of various Indian languages of Mexico,” which includes Mixtec information. In the “Zapotec” section of the finding aid, see de Angulo's “Estudio gramatical de las lenguas de la familia zapoteca,” which includes Mixtec information and ten ink sketches of maps showing linguistic groups, and de Angulo's “Zapotecan texts,” which includes Mixtec texts. Specific Mixtec languages identified above are based upon languages located in Radin's fieldwork.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Nahua
Alternate forms: Aztec
Date: 1912-1924, 1928, 1930, 1940, 1949-1950, 1953
Type:Text
Extent: 359 pages, Circa 750 slips, 1 notebook (314 pages), 1 volume (168 pages)
Description: The Nahua materials in the ACLS collection consist of numerous items in the "Nahuatl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing. Prominent materials include texts recorded by Boas from Milpa Alta speakers, including Doña Luz Jiménez, in 1912. There are also additional texts, recorded by Miguel Barrios Espinosa in 1950 San Juan Tlilhuacan, Delegacion de Azcapotzales, Mexico City. Boas and Mason's "Nahautl vocabulary" contains 750+ word slips based upon work by Simeón and Mason. "Vocabulares Nawatl" by Leon and Swadesh consists of vocabulary of 3 Nahuatl dialects (identified as Telina, Ilamalan, and San Pedro [Atocpan?]) based on field work in 1939 with 4 speakers. There are additional grammatical studies and linguistic treatments by Whorf, Barlow, Croft, and Ripley. Some Nahuatl vocabulary can also be found in comparative Uto-Aztecan materials in the "Uto-Aztecan" section of the finding aid.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Tohono O'odham
Alternate forms: Papago
Language(s): English | Spanish | Tohono O'odham
Date: 1940 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 12 pages
Description: The Tohono O'odham materials in the ACLS collection consist of two brief items in the "Papago" section of the finding aid. One is a Spanish-O'odahm vocabulary with 118 words, recorded by Morris Swadesh. The other, "Papago phonetics and texts," by an unidentified author, includes a brief discussion of phonetics, texts relating to hunting rabbit and deer, with interlinear and free translations, songs, and a speech.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Huichol | Nahua | Tarahumara | Tepecano | Tepehuán | Tohono O'odham | Yaqui | Mayo | Akimel O'odham | Ute | Paiute | Hupa | Maya | Cora | Ópata
Alternate forms: Cahita, Papago, Pima, Hiaki, Yoeme, Na:tini-xwe, Eudeve
Date: 1914-1962
Type:Text
Extent: 21 items
Description: Materials relating to John Alden Mason's interest and research in Uto-Aztecan languages and cultures. Items include notes and letters on Uto-Aztecan historical Mason's "Some initial phones and combinations in Utaztecan stems," an abstract and full text of a paper delivered at the Philadelphia meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1951); unattributed corresondence discussing that 1951 paper; Mason's correspondence with Edward Sapir regarding Mason's work on the Tepehuan, Papago [Tohono O'odham], Sonoran and Yaqui languages, Sapir's work on Paiute and Hupa, and mentioning Boas, Rivet, Speck, Spier, and Whorf; earlier correspondence with Sapir relaying Tepehuan, Tepecano, Papago [Tohono O'odham], and Nahua examples, data from Mason for Sapir's use in Uto-Aztecan comparative work, Sapir's comments on Mason's data and analysis, and Sapir's views on Uto-Aztecan historical Mason's corresondence with Ruth Benedict regarding work on Papago [Tohono O'odham], Pima, and Yaqui languages, an honorarium for Franz Boas, and Ruth Underhill's Papago Rites and ceremonies; correspondence with George Herzog regarding Tepehuan music and language, Pima-Papago language, and mentioning Franz Boas, Gene Weltfish, Edward Sapir, Ruth Underhill, Frank G. Speck, and others; correspondence with David H. Kelley regarding comparison of Polynesian and Uto-Aztecan languages (Kelly's dissertation); part of Kelley's Harvard University doctoral dissertation regarding the borrowing of Uto-Aztecan words into Polynesian; Benjamin Lee Whorf on Uto-Aztecan languages, including a table of relationships and a photo reproduction of Whorf's Azteco-Tanoan tree; correspondence with Whorf regarding Whorf's grant application to the Social Sciences Research Council to work on modern Nahuatl, and also touching on Uto-Aztecan phonology, Maya glyphs, Nahuatl, Papago [Tohono O'odham], Tepecano, Tepehuan, Yaqui, and subgrouping; and correspondence with Morris Swadesh regarding establishing an official Aztec alphabet, Swadesh's glotto-chronological work in Uto-Aztecan, disagreement between Mason and Swadesh over the number of stop series in Papago [Tohono O'odham], Swadesh's retraction (to be published in Word) of his criticisms of Mason's Papago [Tohono O'odham] grammar, and copies of letters from Swadesh to [Dean] Saxton and Andre Martinet. Undated linguistic materials include notes, Vocabularies, vocabularies, comparisons with notes about correspondences, comparative vocabularies, notes on numerical systems, cognates with English glosses, cognates with Spanish glosses, lexicostatistical compilations, etc. Languages represented (and not merely mentioned) include Huichol, El Nayar Cora, Nahuatl, Opata, Tarahumara, Tepecano, Tepehuan, Tohono O'odham, Tubar, Yaqui, and Mayo; it is unclear, however, which specific Tarahumara and Tepehuan languages are represented.
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Zapotec
Alternate forms: Zapoteco
Date: 1920-1930, 1940-1947
Subject: Linguistics | Stories
Type:Text
Extent: Approx. 980 pages
Description: The Zapotec materials in the ACLS collection are located primarily in the "Zapotec" section of the finding aid, which includes a detailed listing. The bulk of the materials were recorded and assembled by Jaime de Angulo and Morris Swadesh. De Angulo's materials include texts with Spanish and English translations, with accompanying linguistic notes, and studies proposing relationship among languages of Oaxaca. Swadesh's materials include vocabularies in multiple varieties of Zapotec with accompanying linguistic analyses. Currently only the three Zapotec languages given above in this listing can be specifically identified based upon information on locations where they were recorded. There are additional Zapotec languages of an undetermined quantity in this materials that are currently only identified in the cataloging according to regional terms such as Mountain and Valley dialects, Ixtlán, and Villa Alta. Some additional comparative materials utilizing Zapotec data can also be found in the "Mexico" and "Mixe" sections of the finding aid.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)