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Catawba | Yupik
Language(s): Catawba | English | Yupik, Central
Date: 1935-1939
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: Circa 2,300 slips, and 1 notebook
Description: The Catawba materials in the ACLS collection consist of three items found in the "Catawba" section of the finding aid. There is one notebook by Morris Swadesh containing texts, Vocabularies, grammatical notes, and a Catawba "letter to Speck." Also includes 2 pages of unidentified "Alaskan Eskimo" mixed in (probably Unaaliq). There are two Catawba lexicons: one by Amelia Susman, containing approximatetly 1,000 slips and organized by stems, based upon Frank Speck's "Catawba Texts" (1934); and another by an unidentified compiler (possibly Frank Siebert), also based on Speck and unpublished materials.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Lenape
Alternate forms: Lenape, Munsee
Language(s): English | Delaware
Date: circa 1925-1967
Extent: 48 folders, 5 boxes
Description: The C. F. Voegelin Papers contain correspondence, card files, notes, notebooks, texts, translations, drafts, articles, maps, and other linguistic and ethnographic materials relating to Delaware (Lenape) language and culture. Many of these items pertain to Voegelin's "Walam Olum or Red Score: The Migration Legend of the Lenni Lenape or Delaware Indians," published by the Indiana Historical Society in 1954. Such materials are located in primarily in Subcollection I. There is relevant correspondence with Charles Hockett (with questions about Voegelin's article on Delaware and examples from other Algonquian languages), Eli Lilly (regarding various aspects of the Walam Olum, its interpretation and publication), Kenneth E. Pearson (regarding use of Delaware language in Boy Scout ceremonies), John N. Seaman (regarding language consultant Willy Longbone), Frank Siebert (regarding Walam Olum, Munsee materials, language consultants Willy Longbone, Nicodemus Peters, and Nicholas Powless), Morris Swadesh (including a brief Stockbridge vocabulary and a slip of Moravian Delaware), and John Witthoft (regarding Walam Olum) in Series I. Correspondence. Delaware materials also include 5 boxes of card files and 5 folders of document files (primarily vocabulary and linguistic notes, and including 1 box and 1 folder relating to specifically to Munsee and 1 box and 1 folder of Walam Olum vocabulary keyed to the Rafinesque translation) in Series II. 7 folders pertaining to Voegelin's work on the Walam Olum in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries III-A: Works Translated by Voegelin; a folder on Delaware grammar in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries III-B: Works Authored by Voegelin; 3 articles on the Walam Olum by Constantine Rafinesque, Daniel G. Brinton, and Frank Speck in Series IV. Works by Others; 2 folders on Delaware and 1 on Delaware-Munsee (containing Vocabularies, notes, texts, translations, and various typed works by the Group for Delaware at the Linguistic Institute over multiple summers) in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-A: Language Notes; 18 folders of unbound texts in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-B: Text; Delaware materials in Blackfoot Folder #2 and Ojibwe Folder #24 in Series VI. Notebooks; an ink map of Delaware locations created for Voegelin's published translation of the Walam Olum in Series VII. Photographs; and a folder related to Voegelin's translation of the Walam Olum in the Oversized files.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Hupa
Alternate forms: Na:tini-xwe
Language(s): English | Hupa
Date: Undated
Type:Text
Extent: 1 folder
Description: Found in Subcollection I, Series I, Section "VII. Northwest Coast." Consists of a one-page typescript with two lines of Hupa text, followed by explanation and analysis of each word or lexical unit. Author not identified, though it is likely not Speck, as he did not study Hupa or other Dene languages, nor did he specialize in linguistic analysis. Source is likely Edward Sapir or Pliny Earle Goddard.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Innu
Alternate forms: Montagnais
Language(s): English | Innu-aimun | French
Date: 1925-1937; 1982
Type:Text
Description: The Innu materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are predominantly linguistic materials, with one story and ethnographic study. Original notes by Siebert can be found in Series V: Notebooks, under notebooks labelled "Lake St. John" and "Scribble-in Book." Secondary sources, which use the term "Montagnais," can be found in Series IV and VII
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Maliseet
Alternate forms: Malecite
Date: 1916-1949 (bulk 1916, 1945‐1948)
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: The Speck Maliseet materials include vocabulary lists, unpublished notes from Speck's work on hunting territories, a comparative analysis between Maliseet and Delaware conceptions of the Celestial Bear, and notes on Maliseet dance and songs. Of particular value is a map depicting Maliseet villages along the St. John's River. This material is found primarily in the “Malecite” section of Subcollection I, Series I, Research Material, with additional materials in correspondence series, photographs, and maps. Some Maliseet information may be located among Passamaquoddy, Penobscot, or other materials from the same region.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Mi'kmaq | Passamaquoddy | Maliseet | Beothuk | Cherokee
Alternate forms: Micmac, Malecite
Language(s): English | Mi'kmaq
Date: 1909-1949
Type:Text
Extent: 8 folders
Description: Materials relating to Mi'kmaq history, language, and culture. Includes Speck's field notes on topics such as wampum, hunting territories, Cape Breton texts, Newfoundland traditions, the Passamaquoddy, etc., as well as a map with names of Bear River Band members and one piece of birch bark with pictographs inscribed; Speck's miscellaneous notes and correspondence on topics such as consultants, specimens, hieroglyphics, linguistics, fieldwork, Mi'kmaq and Cherokee, and the Mi'kmaq mission newspaper; a text on Mi'kmaq dance with interlinear translation, notes, and a musical score; 10 pages of linguistic notes and vocabulary collected along the Miramichi River, along with 6 pages of typed copy by John Witthoft; correspondence with Mechling concerning linguistic research on the Mi'kmaq, Malecite [Malecite-Passamaquoddy], and Oaxaca languages, Mi'kmaq burials, and historic materials on Beothuk and Mi'kmaq; a brief article on a traveler's account of the Mi'kmaq in 1822; an incomplete article or set of reading excerpts taken after 1922 by Speck from John G. Millais (1907); and extracts concerning the sweat house taken by Butler from the Jesuit Relations.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Mohegan | Pequot | Yuchi | Nanticoke
Language(s): English | Mohegan-Pequot
Date: 1897-1943
Type:Text
Extent: 10 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Mohegan language, history, and culture. Includes Mohegan miscellaneous notes and correspondence from 1916-1943 including commentary on Fidelia Fielding's Texts, notes for 1920 Pequot trip with Nehantic and Pennacook notes, letters from the Honorable Thomas W. Bicknell to Speck concerning Indians in Rhode Island, notes on Mohegan social organization, 1 page of incomplete letter of Red Wing concerning Indian affairs, miscellaneous Stockbridge notes, George Heye to Speck regarding publication, John R. Swanton to Speck concerning his exhibition for Mohegan Stockbridge, postal card from Princess Pretty War regarding dress, Ernest E. Rogers to Speck regarding Speck's Mohegan-Pequot Diary, etc.; Pequot miscellaneous notes and correspondence from 1922-1941 including two cards with Mohegan names, 7 pages of reading notes, 1 page of animal names, a letter from Harral Ayres to the Smithsonian Institution concerning Connecticut place names, and a letter from Gertrude Bell Browne to Speck concerning seventeenth-century Pequot-Mohegan Mohegan-Pequot texts and vocabulary materials, notes and drafts relating to Speck (1928a); letters to his mother concerning his activities among Indians at Mohegan, Connecticut; copy for a news release on a Mohegan election; "Mohegan Land Deeds," a pamplet containing 22 seventeenth-century deeds signed by Connecticut Mohegan Indians, taken from Connecticut archival sources; 21 cards with notes on trees and uses of their products; Prince's 1907 letter of recommendation for Speck, discussing Speck's work, as a student, on the Pequot dialect of Mohegan-Pequots, Algic, and Yuchi; and Ward's correspondence with Speck regarding the printing of extra copies of Speck's Nanticoke study by the Historical Society of Delaware.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway
Language(s): Chippewa | English
Date: 1938; 1951-1952
Extent: 253 pages, 26 cards, 2 maps
Description: The Ojibwe materials in the ACLS collection consist of two items in the "Ojibwa" section of the finding aid. One is Swadesh's "Chippewa field notes," which includes a story and other language information given by Ted St. Germaine of Lac du Flambeau, who attended the Carlisle Indian School, obtained a law degree at Yale in 1913, played as a tackle in the NFL in 1922, became the first Native American admitted to the bar in Wisconsin, and later served as tribal judge for Lac du Flambeau. This section also includes Joe Pierce's "Shawnee, Kickapoo, Ojibwa, Sauk-and-Fox materials," containing discussion of dialect and language relationships, translations of texts, tests, and degree of linguistic relationships. (The Ojibwe in Pierce's work is that spoken at Mount Pleasant.) In the "Northeast" section of the finding aid, two maps annotated by hand by Speck include linguistic and hunting territories, include that for Ojibwe groups.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe | Seneca | Haudenosaunee | Cree | Naskapi | Innu
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Chippewa, Iroquois
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1927-1949
Type:Text
Extent: 14 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Ojibwe language, history, and culture. Includes 15 pages of Tamagami [Temagami First Nation] myths and five texts in English; 21 pages of Matagama Ojibwe [Mattagami First Nation] notes, including a 2-page phonetic key, a letter from Speck to Samuel (i.e., James) Miller of Gogama requesting ethnographic and map data, 2 maps (one of Mattagami hunting territories), typed reading notes, and a sketch of a play for Mattagama Otcipwe [sic]; a Christmas circular letter telling the story of a Chippewa [Ojibwe] boy returning home for Dance; a copy of Speck's favorable review of Sister Bernard Coleman, "Decorative designs of the Ojibwa of northern Minnesota" [Printed, Speck (1949).]; and a brief popular account on Ojibwe hunting territories by Speck, refuting Roosevelt (1889-1896), who had denied that Indians have a sense of property, along with two pages of notes. Also includes several folders of correspondence, including correspondence with A. I. Hallowell in which Hallowell describes a field trip to the Berens River Saulteaux, Sweet Grass Cree (mentions attitude of Cree to Leonard Bloomfield), and Cold Lake Chipewyan, festivals, etc., and a letter from Speck to Hallowell with pencilled responses of Hallowell to questions asked; letters from D. H. Learmouth, a factor for Hudson's Bay Company at Waswanippi, recounting his experiences in adjudicating Matagama land inheritance and providing ethnographic data sought by Speck from Samuel (i.e., James) Miller of Gogama and data on hunting territories; letters from James E. Holden concerning unsuccessful attempts to purchase baskets at Nipigon; letters from J. Allan Burgesse regarding the Matagama Ojibwe and enclosing a drawing of a "flesher"and a list of hunting territories and biographical information on owners; a letter from Robert Solenberger concerning Tonawanda [Seneca] and Chippewa [Ojibwe] women who make baskets and giving their addresses; a letter from B. W. Thayer concerning Ojibwe beadwork found during a Minnesota field trip; a letter from Henry Woodman discussing the decline of crafts among Bear Island Indians (Temagami); a letter from Prentice Gilbert Downes about the circumboreal region, disucssing his visit to Naskapi near Davis Inlet, to Cree, and to Chippewas, along with 2 pages of notes (Speck?) in French-English, discussing changes in Indian culture; and a letter from Speck to Chief Mitchele Buckshot in Maniwaki, Quebec requesting buckskin and beadwork.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee
Alternate forms: Sioux
Language(s): English | Omaha-Ponca
Date: 1935 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 2 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Omaha language, history, and culture. One folder contains 11 pages of miscellaneous notes including 1 page of Sioux [Dakota] or Omaha words, 3 pages of Omaha lexical items, Sioux song text, 4 pages of Omaha text and paradigms, vocabulary, ethnological notes, and 3 pages of Omaha verb conjugations. The second folder contains five pages of material relating to a Plains Indian shield, including one card of bibliographic notes, a letter from Chicago dealer Albert G. Heath to Speck concerning a Pawnee shield sent as specimen, and a letter from F. T. Thunder to Speck concerning an Omaha shield he is making.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)