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Achumawi | Atsugewi
Language(s): Achumawi | Atsugewi | English
Date: 1907, 1931-1935
Type:Text
Extent: 615 pages
Description: The Achumawi materials in the ACLS collection are primarily located in the "Achumawi" section of the finding aid, with some also in the "Atsugewi" section (specifically item H1a.2, "Parallel Achumawi and Atsugewi texts"). They include a word list from the Pit River area; autobiographies of Willard Carmony, an Achumawi speaker, whose stories refers to being sent to Fort Bidwell Indian Boarding School; linguistic analysis of Achumawi's relationship to the Hokan language family; conversational texts in the Achumawi language; free English translations; and grammars. Also included are notes on dialectical differences between Atwamdzini, Hammawi, and Adzumawi.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Ditidaht
Date: ca.1931-1972
Subject: Linguistics | Music
Extent: 1.5 linear feet
Description: The most noteworthy aspect of Mary Haas' Ditidaht file, stemming from fieldwork conducted with Morris Swadesh as her first fieldtrip, is a fairly detailed transcription of songs collected. Series 2 contains the transcriptions and Series 10 the cassette copies, while the original tapes are housed at the Indiana University Archives of Traditional Music. There is much overlap with Nuu-chah-nulth, as Haas frequently identified correspondences between them. A sizeable lexical file (Series 9) and correspondence with many, especially Edward Sapir and George Herzog (Series 1) may also be of interest.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Hupa
Alternate forms: Na:tini-xwe
Language(s): Hupa | English
Date: 1950-1962
Extent: 0.75 linear feet
Description: Haas' Hupa file is mostly comprised of published and unpublished work by others, most notably Mary Woodward and Edward Sapir. Series 1 includes correspondence with both Mary Woodward and Victor Golla on Hupa fieldwork and research. Chimariko and Hupa card files in Series 9 include lexica, phonological analysis and ethnographic notes, and are derived from work by Sapir and Woodward, including transcriptions by Woodward herself. Haas' Yurok field notebook in Series 2 includes a 12-page Hupa section with consultants Ned Jackson and Sam Brown, consisting of a basic lexicon and some grammatical paradigms. There are also some additional morphological and phonological analyses in the same series with notes from an unidentified author (possibly Woodward), and Haas made use of Hupa as an exercise in phonological reconstruction. Copies of materials housed at the Berkeley Language Center are also present in Series 10, and have been digitized, available at the APS Digital Library.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

A'wa'etłala | K'ómoks | Da'naxda'xw | Dzawada'enuxw | Gopinuxw | Gusgimukw | Gwa'sala | Gwatsinuxw | Gwawa'enuxw | Kwakwaka'wakw | Kwagu'ł | Kwikwasutinuxw | Ławitsis | Ma'a̱mtagila | Mamalilikala | Nak'waxda'xw | Namgis | Tłatłasikwala | Wiwekam | Wiweqayi | Ndau | Zulu | Heiltsuk
Alternate forms: Gwasilla, Gwawaenuk, K'omoks, Koskimo, Kwakiutl, Kwicksutaineuk, Laich-kwil-tach, Lekwiltok, Nakoaktok, Nakwoktak, Nimpkish, Quatsino, Tanakteuk, Tlowitsis, Tsawataineuk, Weiwaikai, Weiwaikum
Date: 1893-1951
Extent: Approx. 10,000 loose pages, 10 notebooks, 7000+ cards, 10+ maps
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw materials in the ACLS collection are located predominantly in the "Kwakiutl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing of all materials (other relevant sections are "Northwest Coast", "Bella Bella (Heitsuk)", and item AfBnd.4 in "Non-American and non-linguistic material"). Some of the larger individual sets of materials listed within this section also have their own specific tables of contents (available upon request) detailing their often highly diverse contents. Overall, the vast majority of the material is made of of 1) manuscripts sent to Boas by George Hunt from the 1890s to the 1930s, frequently in both Kwak'wala and English, covering a very broad range of Kwakwaka'wakw history, culture, languages, customs, and traditions; and 2) field work materials recorded by Boas and Boas' own analyses of material sent by Hunt, covering a similar range of topics. Additional materials by other individuals focus especially on linguistic and ethnographic matters. Also see the "Kwakiutl materials, Franz Boas Papers," for information on the correspondence between Boas and Hunt, which gives additional context to the materials in the ACLS collection.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Nahua
Alternate forms: Aztec
Date: 1912-1924, 1928, 1930, 1940, 1949-1950, 1953
Type:Text
Extent: 359 pages, Circa 750 slips, 1 notebook (314 pages), 1 volume (168 pages)
Description: The Nahua materials in the ACLS collection consist of numerous items in the "Nahuatl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing. Prominent materials include texts recorded by Boas from Milpa Alta speakers, including Doña Luz Jiménez, in 1912. There are also additional texts, recorded by Miguel Barrios Espinosa in 1950 San Juan Tlilhuacan, Delegacion de Azcapotzales, Mexico City. Boas and Mason's "Nahautl vocabulary" contains 750+ word slips based upon work by Simeón and Mason. "Vocabulares Nawatl" by Leon and Swadesh consists of vocabulary of 3 Nahuatl dialects (identified as Telina, Ilamalan, and San Pedro [Atocpan?]) based on field work in 1939 with 4 speakers. There are additional grammatical studies and linguistic treatments by Whorf, Barlow, Croft, and Ripley. Some Nahuatl vocabulary can also be found in comparative Uto-Aztecan materials in the "Uto-Aztecan" section of the finding aid.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Navajo
Alternate forms: Diné, Navaho
Language(s): English | Navajo
Date: 1926-1956; undated
Type:Text
Extent: 7 items
Description: Various materials relating to the study of Navajo language, including 11 notebooks of Navajo songs; 5 notebooks on the Navajo Night Chant in phonetic transcription, with notes in English on language and ceremony; Navajo conversations; Navajo stories; manuscript of Hoijer's Navajo lexicon published in the University of California Publications in Linguistics series (no. 78, 1974); notes on various aspects of Navajo grammar and phonology, with comparisons with other Athapascan languages and reconstructions for Proto-Athapascan; and notes and letters regarding Chic Sandoval's fieldwork on Navajo. Some materials may be restricted to due potential cultural sensitivity, and are noted as such in the guide to the collection.
Collection: Harry Hoijer Collection (Mss.497.3.H68)

Nlaka'pamux
Alternate forms: Thompson
Language(s): English | Nlaka'pamuctsin
Date: 1885, 1898-1918
Extent: 1000+ loose pages, 500+ slips, 23 notebooks, 1 map
Description: The Nlaka'pamux materials in the ACLS collection are located primarily in the "Thompson" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing. They consist predominantly of ethnographic, historical, linguistic, and botanical materials recorded and assembled by James Teit from the 1890s to the 1910s and sent to Boas. Many of the material listed in the finding aid, especially those of larger size, are composed of many shorter, distinct individual manuscripts on specific topics that were gathered together into the large sets of manuscripts and assigned general titles such as "Thompson materials" or "Salish ethnographic materials." Many additional Nlaka'pamux materials can also be found in the "Salish" section of the finding aid, often intermixed among information on neighboring Interior Salish peoples. In both of these sections there are also some additional materials, generally linguistic, by Franz Boas and others.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Ahousaht | Cheklesahht | Ehattesaht | Hesquiaht | Hupacasath | Huu-ay-aht | Kyuquot | Mowachaht | Muchalaht | Nuu-chah-nulth | Tla-o-qui-aht | Toquaht | Tseshaht | Uchucklesaht | Ucluelet
Alternate forms: Aht, Clayoquot, Nootka, Nutka, Ohiaht, Opetchesaht, Tahkaht
Language(s): English | Nuu-chah-nulth
Date: 1895-1952 (bulk 1910-1914, 1931-1935)
Extent: 5600+ loose pages, 66,000+ slips, 29 notebooks
Description: The Nuu-chah-nulth materials in the ACLS collection consist of a large body of various materials primarily collected by Franz Boas, Edward Sapir, George Hunt, and Morris Swadesh. The majority of the content pertains to Hupacasath and Tseshaht people in the Alberni Valley area, with the exception of the Hunt materials, which were recorded in the Yuquot area, Mowachaht territory. All of these materials are found in the "Nootka" section of the finding aid, which contains a full, detailed listing. The Boas materials are consist of a lexicon of 1500+ word slips dating from the 1890s. Hunt's "Nootka Tales" consist of large body of traditional stories written in English and later typed up by Sapir with additional notes. Sapir's materials comprise the bulk of this section overall. See especially his extremely voluminous "Miscellaneous Nootka material," the final item in the "Nootka" section, for which a detailed table of contents is available upon request. This set of materials includes 24 field notebooks with extensive stories (some unpublished or untranslated) and ethnographic notes, as well of 80 folders of typed up notes from the notebooks, arranged into categories. It also includes some photographs, censuses of Nuu-chah-nulth "bands" (1920-1921), and 10 folders notes derived by Sapir (and Swadesh?) from "NW Coast Sources and Archives," pertaining to the region more broadly, including information on Coast Salish culture and history. Finally, Swadesh's materials include some additional ethnographic and linguistic field work, as well as extensive bodies of linguistic analysis of materials recorded by Sapir and himself.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Chippewa
Language(s): English | Ojibwe
Date: November 16, 1830; February 25, 1836; June 29, 1847; August 12, 1898; May 10, 1912; 1956
Type:Text
Extent: 6 items
Description: Relavent materials can be found in the finding aid under the specific dates listed. Nineteenth-century correspondence from Kah-ge-ga-gah-bowh (George Copway) regarding Chippewa education efforts; Schoolcraft's work on "Indian tales," a vocabulary of the Algic requested by James Barbour, and biographical sketches of chiefs; Kidder obtained tales from Charley Bawgam and Jack LaPique on murder of trader, Aitken, 1837, and on mermaid tradition among Ojibwe. Under May 10, 1912, there is a 2-page "A Story of Turtle and His Brother'' in Ojibwe and English, told by Edwin Maness of Sarnia Reserve, Ontraio, and recorded by Edward Sapir. Also 1956 transcription of the Ojibwe songs from Lac du Flambeau by Willie Catfish, cataloged in Mss.Rec.75.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

St'at'imc
Alternate forms: Lillooet
Language(s): English | St'at'imcets
Date: 1910-1921
Type:Text
Extent: 200+ pages
Description: The St'at'imc materials in the ACLS collection consist mainly of materials in the "Lillooet" section of the finding aid. These include ethnographic notes and multiple Vocabularies recorded by Sapir, Boas, and Teit, including both Upper and Lower Lillooet. In the "Salish" section, Teit's "Salish ethnographic notes" includes information on St'at'imc objects sent to the American Museum of Natural History, and Teit's "Songs from the Salish area" includes notes on 80 songs (some of which are St'at'imc) recorded for and sent to the National Museum of Canada (now the Canadian Museum of History.) In the "Thompson" section of the finding aid, Teit's "Salish ethnographic materials" (item 61) includes some St'at'imc ethnographic information of undetermined extent.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)