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Apache
Language(s): English | Apache
Date: 1938 and undated
Type:Text
Genre: Notes | Essays | Maps
Extent: 4 folders
Description: Three items relating to Apache languages have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. All are in Subcollection II. They include Apache material in a folder labeled "Athabascan (Chipewyan)" as well as a separate "Apachean" folder in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries II. Na-Dene. The "Apachean" folder contains a typescript version of "The Word" by Gladys Reichard (with a note from Reichard), a draft typescript with annotation of "The Apachean Verb, Part I: Verb Structure and Pronomial Prefixes," by Harry Hoijer, and Voegelin's notes on Hoijer's articles on Apachean. Finally, there is a Chiricahua Apache story ("Child-of-the-Water Kills Four Monsters") as well as a Taos story about an Apache youth ("An Apache Boy Takes a Redhead Scalp") in the Southwestern Indian Tales section of Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries II: American Indian Tales for Children. Apache languages (Chiricahua, Jicarilla, Mescalero, and Jano) are also represented on Harry Tschopik's map of "Indian Languages in New Mexico, A.D. 1600" (1938) in Subseries V: American Indian Languages. This item has been digitized and is available through the APS's Digital Library.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Coeur d'Alene | Spokane
Alternate forms: Schitsu'umsh
Language(s): Coeur d'Alene | English
Date: 1908; Circa 1910; 1930s
Type:Text
Extent: 435 pages; 1 notebook
Description: The Coeur d'Alene materials in the ACLS collection consist mainly of 3 items in the "Coeur d'Alene" section of the finding aid. One is Reichard's "Coeur d'Alene Indian texts," containing 51 texts without translations. Two items recorded by James Teit consist of Coeur d'Alene vocabularies, some relating to material culture and religion. In the "Nlaka'pamux" section of the finding aid, Teit's "Field notes or Thompson and neighboring Salish languages" includes some Coeur d'Alene information, though the extent is undetermined as these notebooks have not yet been fully indexed. "Suffixes in Thompson" contains some incidental Coeur d'Alene terms written in.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Coeur d'Alene
Language(s): English | Coeur d'Alene
Date: 1910s-1940s
Type:Text
Extent: .25 linear feet
Description: This collection contains the bulk of correspondence between Franz Boas and his professional colleagues, though there are also other Boas collections in the library. The correspondents listed above contain some correspondence related to the culture or language listed in this entry. The correspondences with Gladys Reichard and James Teit are the most extensive. In the finding aid listings for some of these correspondents, the individual letters pertaining to this culture or language will be identified by a subject heading, though for some correspondents this indexing has not yet been completed. Some letters may contain only brief mentions of work being conducted in relation to the topic. Some additional correspondences in this collection that have not yet been indexed may also contain additional material.
Collection: Franz Boas Papers (Mss.B.B61)

Schitsu'umsh
Alternate forms: Coeur d'Alene
Language(s): Coeur d'Alene | English
Date: Undated
Type:Text
Genre: Stories
Extent: 1 folder
Description: The Coeur d'Alene materials in the Franz Boas Professional Papers consist of 1 folder labelled "Coeur d'Alene Indian Text," which includes an Interlinear text written down by Gladys Reichard.
Collection: Franz Boas Personal and Professional Papers (Mss.B.B61p)

Colville | Ktunaxa
Alternate forms: Kootenai, Kootenay, Kutenai
Date: 1891, 1894, 1913-1927, 1947
Type:Text
Extent: 19 notebooks, 66 bluebooks, 1052 loose pages, approx. 5600 word slips
Description: The Ktunaxa materials in the ACLS collection are concentrated primarily in the "Kutenai" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing of all contents. The earliest materials in this section linguistic manuscripts by Jesuit missionaries such as Phillippo Canestrelli and John Post, as well as extensive linguistic and anthropological field notes by Alexander Chamberlain, all from the 1890s. Subsequently, James Teit's "Traditions and information regarding the Tonaxa" from 1913 includes ethnographic and historical information, recorded in part at Tobacco Plains. The most voluminous amount of material overall is that of Franz Boas, recorded in the 1910s, which includes numerous field notebooks, lexical files, and related notes. Finally, see also Paul Garvin's field notes from 1947, recorded at Phrases taken from Lower Kutenai at Bonner's Ferry, Idaho; Cranbrook, B.C.; Creston, B.C.; and Elmo, Montana.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Kalispel | Salish | Séliš-Ql̓ispé
Alternate forms: Flathead, Pend d'Oreille
Date: 1879, 1898-1910, 1930
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 220+ pages, 610 cards
Description: The Salish-Kalispel materials in the ACLS collection consist of materials located primarily in the "Kalispel" section of the finding aid. Two early items are Joseph Giorda's "Appendix to the Kalispel-English dictionary, compiled by the Missionaries of the Society of Jesus" and John Post's "Kalispel grammar," based in part upon Giorda's material from the 1870s. There is also an undated lexicon by an unidentified author. In the "Salish" section of the finding aid, see also Teit's "Kalispel and Salish vocabulary" and Boas' "Notes on Salish inflections," based on Mengarini's "Flathead grammar" from 1861. In the "Thompson" section, Boas' "Suffixes in Thompson" also contains some Kalispel terms. In the "Quinault" section, Teit's "Quinault vocabulary and paradigms" includes a letter to Boas describing his work in Flathead country.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Language(s): English
Date: 1986
Type:Text
Extent: 28 pages
Description: Barbara Babcock (Department of English) and Nancy Parezo (American Indian Studies and Anthropology) are members of the faculty at the University of Arizona. Their oral history of women anthropologists in the southwestern United States was published in 1988 as Daughters of the Desert : Women Anthropologists and the Native American Southwest, 1880-1980. This related essay includes brief biographical discussions of over 30 women who worked in the southwestern United States between 1880 and 1945. It was published as "The leading edge: Women anthropologists in the native American Southwest, 1880-1945," El Palacio 92 (1986).
Collection: Women Anthropologists and the Native American Southwest, 1880-1945 (Mss.301.092.B11w)