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Haudenosaunee | Oneida | Seneca
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1920-1939
Extent: 1 folder
Description: The Haudenosaunee materials in the Hallowell papers are located in Series V. There are postcards of museum exhibits featuring Iroquois culture in the "American Indian" series of folders. The rest of the materials are concentrated in the folder labled "Eastern Woodlands." These items include information on material culture, the social organization of the confederacy, a chart of relational systems of clans, kinship, and genealogy. Specific topics includ Huron Mythology, Oneida magic, Seneca secret societies and genealogy. Some of this material is culturally sensitive.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1815-1945
Type:Text
Extent: 25 items
Description: Various materials relating to Haudenosaunee people, culture, history, and language. Correspondence includes a typed copy of a 1815 letter from Haudenosaunee chiefs to the Secretary of War listing losses in the War of 1812; Daniel Webster thanking Parker for a gift copy of Morgan's "League of the Iroquois"; letters pertaining to Parker's assistance to both fiction and non-fiction writers such as Lewis Henry Morgan, Anna C. Campbell, Alfred B. Street, Charles Talbot Porter, etc.; William Cornwall's suggestion that the Haudenosaunee still own the Thousand Islands on the Canadian side of the border; letters pertaining to the New York Indians in Kansas Territory prosecuting claims under treaties of 1838 and 1842; Parker to B.F. Hall regarding "traditional history" of Chief Logan [see also #557]; and Parker to the President of the United States requesting that Peter Wilson be continued as interpreter for the New York Indian agency. Other items include a fragment of Ely Parker's "History of the government, manners, customs...(of the Iroquois Confederacy)"; his mutilated manuscript describing "a Grand Council of the Six Nations of New York, held at Tonawanda for the purpose of hearing again their religious code, from Jimmy Johnson, the Grand High Priest of the Iroquois Confederacy"; his "Initiation of the Wolf tribe of the Cayuga nation, one of the confederate nations of the Grand Confederacy of Iroquois"; other notes, extracts, and short essays by Ely Parker on Haudenosaunee-related topics; Caroline Parker's school essay on Handsome Lake; three chapters of Arther Caswell Parker's unpublished manuscript, "Red Embers of the Longhouse"; Asher Wright's memo book on the Council of the Six Nations held at Cattaraugus (December 1, 1862); Edward Ehlers' address suggesting similarities between Iroquois Longhouse and Masonic Lodge symbolism; and Peter Wilson's talk on Haudenosaunee history before the New York Historical Society.
Collection: Ely Samuel Parker Papers (Mss.497.3.P223)

Haudenosaunee | Delaware | Catawba | Cherokee | Houma | Nanticoke | Abenaki | Cayuga | Tutelo | Onondaga | Mohawk | Tuscarora
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1777-1950, bulk 1914-1950
Type:Text
Extent: 23 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Haudenosaunee history, language, and culture. Includes correspondence with Haudenosaunee consultants like John L. Buck, Seth Newhouse, Josiah Hill, David S. Hill, etc., on topics ranging from the seizure of wampum by the Canadian government, Newhouse's request that Speck secure wampum for him, Newhouse's offer to sell Speck his history manuscript, which he has been working on since 1885 [#1650], Haudenosaunee burial customs, religion, etc.; an essay by Jesse Moses titled "The Long-House man, a Six Nations Indian of Canada speaks his mind," about the relationship of Christianity and the long-house religion; Speck's correspondence with William N. Fenton, principally concerning field work among the Catawba, Cherokee, and Houma but also touching on Fenton's Seneca field work, Speck's various studies of the Haudenosaunee, and the Second Conference on Iroquois Research; correspondence with other anthropologists about various aspects of Haudenosaunee history and culture such as material culture specimens, archaeology, historical sources, agriculture, education, warfare, religion, population statistics, etc.; a draft of Speck's "Reflections on Iroquois religion" and related correspondence; an undated document describing a meeting of Delaware, Nanticoke, and Canadian Iroquois in the presence of Speck and recounting the injustices suffered by Indians in United States and Canada; a copy of a 1777 treaty made by Peter F. Timothy, a Moravian Delaware, in August 1888, and transmitted to Speck by Jesse Moses; and Speck's research notes and other miscellaneous correspondence on topics such as masks, art, museum specimens, hunting territory, chiefships, words, warfare with the Abenaki, the Delaware-as-women theme, academic publications and conferences, etc.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Haudenosaunee | Cherokee | Catawba | Shawnee | Delaware | Wyandot | Miami | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: January 22, 1736; 1744-1774; November 3, 1768; March 14, 1792; 1794; March 10, 1796; August 28, 1817; October 7, 1892; November 11, 1913; November 20, 1913; 1952; 1953-1954; September 1954; Undated
Type:Text
Extent: 14 items
Description: Relavent materials can be found in the finding aid under the specific dates listed. A variety of materials relating to the Haudenosaunee. Eighteenth-century materials include James Logan's treaty instructions to Conrad Weiser in 1736/7; examples of symbols used in treaty signatures by chiefs; miscellaneous items relating to treaties, Indian raids, and land transfers in Virginia;a 1768 deed of land to William Trent; using the Six Nations to make peace with western tribes; Indian agents' accounts, and a journal of a survey of Moravian lands in the Erie triangle translated and edited by Paul A. W. Wallace. Nineteenth-century materials include correspondence regarding Iroquois language and an Iroquois census. Twentieth-century materials include lectures given by Wallace and Leland (on Benjamin Franklin, and on the Deerfield massacre and Eleazer Williams' claim to be the Lost Dauphin, respectively); correspondence between Newhouse and Parker about Newhouse's manuscript history of the "Five Nations Union," the Society of American Indians and possible creation of a Society of Canadian Indians; and Snyderman's essay on ethnohistory, particularly through materials at the American Philosophical Society, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the Quaker Historical Association, and the Haverford College Library. Other individuals mentioned include Shekallemy, Samuel Kirkland, Alfred, Street, Captain Brant, LIttle Billy, George Hoopaugh, Jacob Harmon, John Williams, Warham Williams, Madame de Pentigny, Captain John Stoddard, and John H. Hanson.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Haudenosaunee | Mohawk | Seneca | Tuscarora | Delaware | Oneida
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1936-1967
Extent: 39 items
Description: Materials relating to Paul A. W. Wallace's interest in Haudenosaunee people, history, and culture. Of particular interest will be Wallace's correspondence and interviews with Haudenosaunee individuals. This includes Wallace's extensive correspondence with Ray Fadden (Tehanetorens, Aren Akweks) on subjects such as publications, the Six Nations, the Akwesasne Mohawks, personal matters, etc., as well as a woodcut by John Fadden (Kahionhes) titled "The persecuted Iroquois"; Ray Fadden's "The Visions of Handsome Lake," an interpretation of Ray Fadden's wampum belt (with two drawings by John Fadden); and Ray Fadden's (Aren Akweks, Tehanetorens) "Iroquois Lesson Book-Stories for good children and bad." Interview materials include a Six Nations Journal, containing notes on interviews with Nick Peters, Chief Joseph Montour, John Napoleon Brinton Hewitt, Isaiah Williams, Chief Hess, Chief William Loft, Alec General, and Jerry Aaron; notes, manuscripts, and interviews with William Dewaseragech Loft relating to the Six Nations and to Wallace's preparation of an entry on Loft for the Dictionary of Canadian Biography; and a transcript of a talk on Haudenosaunee cosmogony and history of relations with white people attributed to the Seneca chief Cornplanter and taken from a document (circa 1822) in the Draper Collection at Princeton University. Other Native correspondents and consultants include Jesse J. Cornplanter regarding the purchase of drawings, along with five of Cornplanter's drawings: "Two Friends," "Mortise," and three untitled; Alexander J. General (Deskaheh) regarding copies of Wallace's White Roots of Peace, the identity of a Mohawk chief, the meaning of some names, and Wallace's trip for the Seventh Annual Pageant at Ohnedagowah; E. T. Montour regarding the Handsome Lake religion; Ethel Brant Montour regarding the Six Nations and the Brant and Montour families; Donald Richmond regarding copying the Seth Newhouse version of Deganawidah sent to the St. Regis Mohawks; Allan Wargon regarding the film "The Longhouse People"; M. J. Jamieson regarding attendance by Wallace at the Condolence to the Dead and the Great Feast for the Dead; Arthur Einhorn (Skaroniate) regarding copies of publications, misinformation about the Iroquois, and plans for building an "Indian village"; Emily General regarding possible genealogical studies of chiefs of the Six Nations, the annual pageant at Ohnedagowah, and vital statistics of Deskaheh (Hi-wyi-iss, Levi General); Bernice Minton Loft Winslow (Dawendine) regarding the Six Nations, the health of her father Chief William Loft (Mohawk), publications, her poetry; Mad Bear regarding a parcel of land in Philadelphia reportedly owned by the and Robert Gabor (Sagotaoala) regarding Gabor's interest in and research on the effects of the adoption complex on the Iroquois Confederacy, his art work for Ray Fadden, circumstances under which the Delawares entered the League, etc. There is also correspondence between Wallace and other non-Native researchers including Charles E. Congdon regarding arrangements for conferences on Iroquoian studies; James T. Edward regarding a biographical sketch of Madam Montour for Notable American Women, 1607-1950; Peter Schuyler Miller regarding the Deganawidah legend; Arthur Caswell Parker regarding the Six Nations and Conrad Weiser; Harvey Chalmers regarding Heckewelder's prejudice against the Six Nations and its effect on Cooper, and prejudice aroused by Cooper's novels; Howard F. Comrie regarding the Iroquois Confederacy as an inspiration for the Constitution and Bill of Rights; Harry C. Durston regarding the date and place of the founding of the Five Nations Confederacy and possible influences of the Six Nations on the United States Constitution; John F. Freeman regarding Ray Fadden and the Akwesasne Mohawk Counsellor Organization and mentioning Seth Newhouse, Bernice Loft, and Edward Ahenakew; Marion E. Gridley regarding The Amerindian: American Indian Review, a picture of Maria Tallchief, and role of the Delawares, Tuscaroras, and Oneidas in the American Revolution; Alfred K. Guthe regarding old photos of Iroquois costumes in the Rochester Museum of Arts and Sciences; John Serres regarding the dedication of an Iroquois monument at Scarboro, Ontario and attempts to preserve Native culture; William N. Fenton regarding the Six Nations, different versions of the Deganawidah legend, meanings of Indian names, archaeological work in the area to be flooded by the Kinzua Dam, political history of the Iroquois, Seth Newhouse, publications, research, fieldwork, etc.; an essay by Fenton on published and manuscript sources relating to the history of political institutions and laws of the Six Nations, particularly with regard to ethnological sources, procedural methods to reach the desired goal, and expected results (published in Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 93 (1949): pages 233-238); and William A. Ritchie regarding a meeting at the American Philosophical Society, Indian trails in the Delaware Valley, and the probable date of the founding of the Five Nations Confederacy. Finally, there are Wallace's own notes, drafts, essays, etc., including notes for and a draft of "The Iroquois-A Brief Outline of their History" and "Return of Hiawatha," on the reasons for Iroquois ascendancy.
Collection: Paul A. W. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64b)

Seneca | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English | Seneca
Date: 1794-1931
Contributor: Parker, Ely Samuel, 1828-1895 | Wright, Laura M. (Laura Maria), 1809-1886 | Wright, Asher, 1803-1875 | Porter, Charles T. (Charles Talbot), 1826-1910 | Shanks, Isaac | Parker, Nicholson H. | Allen, Orlando, 1803-1874 | Wilcox, Henry P. | Stryker, James, 1792-1864 | Potter, Herman B. | Angel, W. P. | Brown, William Linn | Crawford, T. Hartly | Fellows, Joseph, 1782-1873 | Howe, Chester | Jimerson, Samuel | Moseley, William A. | Parker, Caroline, -1892 | Schermerhorn, J. F. (John Freeman), 1786-1851 | Schoolcraft, Henry Rowe, 1793-1864 | Two Guns | Harris, Thompson S. | Avery, C. P. (Charles Pumpelly), 1817-1872 | Cadwallader, Sylvanus, 1825 or 1826- | Flagler, Henry Morrison, 1830-1913 | Hosmer, William H. C. (William Howe Cuyler), 1814-1877 | Lapham, Elbridge Gerry, 1814-1890 | Morgan, Lewis Henry, 1818-1881 | Parker, Arthur Caswell, 1881-1955 | Parker, Levi | Parker, Spencer Cone | Parker, William H. | Parker, Elizabeth | Pierce, Daniel W. | Pringle, Benjamin, 1807-1887 | Warren, N. S. | Warren, R. B. | Wilson, Peter | Martindale, J. H. (John Henry), 1815-1881 | Bronson, Greene C. (Greene Carrier), 1789-1863 | Bryan, William G. | Follett, Frederick, 1804-1891 | Bouck, William C., 1786-1859 | Conrad, Charles Magill, 1804-1878 | Cunningham, H. S. | Dole, William P., approximately 1818-1889 | Fisk, John | Harlin, D. M. | Hinton, Charles Lewis, 1793-1861 | Johnson, Marcus H. | Paine, N. E. | Verplanck, Isaac A. | Manypenny, George Washington, 1809-1893 | Mix, Charles E. | Moore, F. H. | Moses, William | Palfrey, John Gorham, 1796-1881 | Parker, Samuel, 1779-1866 | Shankland, Robert H. | Washburn, C. T. | Jemison, Chauncy C. | Parker, Newton | Parsons, Sylvester | Salisbury, James Henry, 1823-1905 | M. Stagers and Co. | Van Horn, Burt, 1823-1896 | Two Guns, Henry | Edwards, Howard, 1833-1925? | John, Andrew | Blacksmith, John | Johnson, James | Marshall, O. H. (Orsamus Holmes), 1813-1884 | Doctor, Isaac | Wright, Silas, 1795-1847 | Thompson, Jacob, 1810-1885 | Dole, Benjamin
Extent: 367 items
Description: A Sachem and Civil War adjutant to Ulysses Grant, Ely Samuel Parker was an important figure in the Seneca Indian nation during the first half of the nineteenth century. Trained as an engineer, Parker was deeply involved in the Senecas' land disputes with the Ogden Land Company and he played an important role in interpreting Seneca culture for a white audience, most notably as a consultant for Lewis Henry Morgan. Collected by Arthur C. Parker, the Ely Samuel Parker Papers include correspondence, manuscripts, and printed materials relating primarily to Seneca affairs, history, language, and culture, as well as politics, education, engineering, and the Civil War. Several letters relate to Parker's service as engineer of public buildings in Galena, Illinois, and to his Masonic activities. Among the noteworthy items in the collection are several essays on Seneca history and culture, a fragment of Parker's diary, 1847, and a significant quantity of material on the Seneca language assembled by Asher Wright. Rich in information on Seneca history, culture, and language and on Parker's varied activities in both the Indian and white worlds, the collection is a major resource for examining the land and political struggles of the Seneca nation during the 1840s and early 1850s. Comprised of a mix of personal and professional correspondence augmented by a smaller quantity of printed materials, notes, and manuscripts, the collection is richest for the period 1845-1860, with only a few letters pertaining to Parker's Civil War service, and even fewer for the post-war period.
Collection: Ely Samuel Parker Papers (Mss.497.3.P223)