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Otomi
Language(s): English | Spanish | Otomi, Temoaya
Date: 1912-1950
Type:Text
Extent: 2 slips, 80 pages
Description: The Otomi materials in the ACLS collection consist of materials mainly in the "Otomi" section of the finding aid. Key items includes Radin's "Grammatical sketch of Otomi" and Otomi-English dictionary, based upon the "Toluca dialect." See also the "Sintesis de la discusion en el consejo de lenguas indigenas sobre el alfabeto Otomi." In the “Mexico” section of the finding aid, see “Comparative vocabularies of various Indian languages of Mexico,” which includes Otomi vocabulary, and his “Phonemic systems of various Indian languages of Mexico,” which includes Otomi information.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Nahua
Date: ca.1970-2002
Extent: 6 linear feet
Description: The majority of the Jane M. Rosenthal Papers centers on Nahuatl linguistic and anthropological research. Materials therefore appear extensively in every series. Rosenthal's own fieldwork on Tlaxcaltec (Acxotla del Monte, Tlaxcala, Mexico) spanned the 1970s and 1980s, involving the production of 17 field notebooks (Series 2 Subseries 1) with accompanying tapes (Series 10, available in the Digital Library), lexical slips (Series 7), photographs (Series 8) and much correspondence, in Spanish, with members of the Atonal and de Texis families (Series 1). Jane Hill also conducted research with many of the same consultants, works by whom (including interview transcriptions) can be found mostly in Series 5. Rosenthal also engaged with preexisting primary sources at archives in Mexico and the U.S., creating transcriptions and interlinearizations of texts (Series 2 Subseries 2), and produced several articles on Nahuatl grammar, Nahua culture and interactions with missions (Series 2 Subseries 3). Further to her own work, this collection contains much gathered material by others. In addition to that of Jane and Kenneth Hill, several drafts and publications by fellow University of Chicago student Kay A. Read on Nahua/Aztec religion appear in Series 5, and publications and commentary with other Uto-Aztecanists are scattered throughout Series 1 and 5. Rosenthal was heavily involved in the meetings of the Friends of Uto-Aztecan from its inception in 1973, many handouts from which (relating to a variety of Uto-Aztecan languages) can be found in Series 6. Her student notes, many produced by Norman McQuown (Series 3), and teaching notes (Series 4) may also be of interest.
Collection: Jane M. Rosenthal Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.129)

Totonac
Date: 1936, 1940
Type:Text
Extent: 28 pages
Description: The Totonac materials in the ACLS collection consist mainly of one item, "Los totonacos y su idioma," primarily in Spanish. Revision of Yale doctoral dissertation; includes introduction, explication of new Totonac alphabet, grammatical notes, and one text, "The Man and the Hawk," with English and Spanish translations. This item can be found in the "Totonac" section of the finding aid. See also "Macro-Penutian" by Benjamin Whof in the "Linguistics, General" section of the finding aid, which may contain some Totonac data.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Zapotec
Alternate forms: Zapoteco
Date: 1920-1930, 1940-1947
Subject: Linguistics | Stories
Type:Text
Extent: Approx. 980 pages
Description: The Zapotec materials in the ACLS collection are located primarily in the "Zapotec" section of the finding aid, which includes a detailed listing. The bulk of the materials were recorded and assembled by Jaime de Angulo and Morris Swadesh. De Angulo's materials include texts with Spanish and English translations, with accompanying linguistic notes, and studies proposing relationship among languages of Oaxaca. Swadesh's materials include vocabularies in multiple varieties of Zapotec with accompanying linguistic analyses. Currently only the three Zapotec languages given above in this listing can be specifically identified based upon information on locations where they were recorded. There are additional Zapotec languages of an undetermined quantity in this materials that are currently only identified in the cataloging according to regional terms such as Mountain and Valley dialects, Ixtlán, and Villa Alta. Some additional comparative materials utilizing Zapotec data can also be found in the "Mexico" and "Mixe" sections of the finding aid.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)