Current Filters
Click filter to remove
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2
Nahua
Date: ca.1940s-2003
Type:Text
Extent: 2 linear feet
Description: William Bright's Nahuatl materials are sizeable and cover his entire research life, mostly consisting of his own work from the 1960s and 1990s (Series 4), and many copies of small publications throughout his life (Series 2). Of note in the small publications is almost every issue of “Nahua Newsletter” (Indiana University) between 1986 and 2004, issues 1-18 of “Mexihkatl Itonalama”, and several 1940s-1960s SIL-archived publications. From his own work (Series 4) are interlinear glosses of Nahuatl texts, materials in preparation for taught courses at UCLA, products of brief fieldwork in Ixmiquilpan, Mexico, 1966, working versions of two of his own publications, and further linguistic analysis. He also corresponded with several linguists on Nahuatl varieties (Series 1), including Una Canger, who gave him a copy of the Copenhagen Nahuatl Dictionary Project.
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Nahua
Date: ca.1970-2002
Extent: 6 linear feet
Description: The majority of the Jane M. Rosenthal Papers centers on Nahuatl linguistic and anthropological research. Materials therefore appear extensively in every series. Rosenthal's own fieldwork on Tlaxcaltec (Acxotla del Monte, Tlaxcala, Mexico) spanned the 1970s and 1980s, involving the production of 17 field notebooks (Series 2 Subseries 1) with accompanying tapes (Series 10, available in the Digital Library), lexical slips (Series 7), photographs (Series 8) and much correspondence, in Spanish, with members of the Atonal and de Texis families (Series 1). Jane Hill also conducted research with many of the same consultants, works by whom (including interview transcriptions) can be found mostly in Series 5. Rosenthal also engaged with preexisting primary sources at archives in Mexico and the U.S., creating transcriptions and interlinearizations of texts (Series 2 Subseries 2), and produced several articles on Nahuatl grammar, Nahua culture and interactions with missions (Series 2 Subseries 3). Further to her own work, this collection contains much gathered material by others. In addition to that of Jane and Kenneth Hill, several drafts and publications by fellow University of Chicago student Kay A. Read on Nahua/Aztec religion appear in Series 5, and publications and commentary with other Uto-Aztecanists are scattered throughout Series 1 and 5. Rosenthal was heavily involved in the meetings of the Friends of Uto-Aztecan from its inception in 1973, many handouts from which (relating to a variety of Uto-Aztecan languages) can be found in Series 6. Her student notes, many produced by Norman McQuown (Series 3), and teaching notes (Series 4) may also be of interest.
Collection: Jane M. Rosenthal Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.129)