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Lenape | Miami | Haudenosaunee | Shawnee | Piscataway | Nanticoke
Alternate forms: Lenape, Iroquois
Language(s): English | French | Delaware | Munsee
Date: October 3, 1738; April 1756; March 10, 1778; January 13, 1788; March 4, 1856
Type:Text
Extent: 10 items
Description: Relavent materials can be found in the finding aid under the specific dates listed. Materials include information relations with the colony of Pennsylvania; Pennsylvania's Indian affairs more generally, particularly Quaker involvement, embassies to Wyoming (PA) and elsewhere, and gifts for Indians; Indian relations with the federal government of the United States; Delaware materials in the Moravian Archives at Bethlehem and elsewhere; review of Du Ponceau's Delaware Grammar in Revue Encyclopedique; Place names; Heckewelder's Account of the Indian nations; Harrison's 1803 treaty with the Delawares and other Indians at Fort Wayne; Indian settlements in Ohio, and the difficulty of Christian Indians; a Delaware spelling book with vocabularies. Other individuals mentioned include Nookamis, "Sandusky Indian," Ettwein, Zeisberger, and Paul A.W. Wallace.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Ho-Chunk | Shoshone | Crow | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | A'aninin
Alternate forms: Winnebago, Shoshoni, Kansa, Sioux, Minnetaree, Gros Ventre
Language(s): English
Date: 1806-1892
Type:Text
Extent: 7 items
Description: Correspondence regarding Plains Indian materials. Includes Thomas Jefferson's letter to John Vaughan transmitting a copy of his "communications to Congress of the information respecting Louisiana..." [Jefferson (1806)]; Du Ponceau's request for a copy of the first two pages of Journal historique from original in Department of State; Du Ponceau to Johann S. Vater concerning Indian vocabularies brought in by Major Long, which are being copied into his book, where he now has 25 vocabularies (notes that Long lost others when baggage men deserted to the Indians); John C. Calhoun's instructions for Long's Missouri expedition (Long urged to pacify and conciliate Indians, get information as to their number and character, fill in vocabulary forms, and follow Jefferson's instructions to Lewis [Printed (in part), James (1823): 3-5]; Ferdinand V. Hayden's observations on the Indian history of the Colorado region, including use of stone arrow points by the Pawnees, earth huts of Indians along Missouri River, use of stone implements, and his belief that Digger Indians of Nevada are most degraded [Printed, Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 10: 352-353]; Daniel G. Brinton's letter to Henry Phillips desiring a copy of Hayden's article on Missouri Tribes for Horatio Hale; and Rev. T.W. Smith's inquiry about a paper on Sign language [See also Dunbar (1809)]. Other Native American groups mentioned include Winnebago, Shoshoni, Upsaroko or Crow, Wahtoktatas, Kanzas, Omahas, Yankton Sioux, Pawnee (Panis), Minnetaree (Gros Ventre), and Sioux.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Language(s): English
Date: October 6, 1805
Type:Text
Extent: 2 pages
Description: Letter to Charles Willson Peale, from original at University of Texas. Jefferson has received articles from Captain Lewis, including minerals for the American Philosophical Society. "There are some articles which I shall keep for an Indian Hall I am forming at Monticello, e.g., horns, dressed skins, utensils, etc., and I am now packing for you...[some animal skeletons]."
Collection: Peale-Sellers Family Collection (Mss.B.P31)

Chickasaw | Lenape | Haudenosaunee | Miami
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1775-1803
Type:Text
Extent: 4 letters
Description: This collection consists of correspondence both to and from Thomas Jefferson, as well as various other material. Four letters in particular refer to Indigenous people: a letter circa 1775 from John Murray, the Earl of Dunmore, to the Delaware leader Captain White-Eyes, urging peace; a letter to Jefferon from William Fleming, June 15, 1776, discussing imminent war with Indians in Canada; Jefferson's letter to General Daniel Smith, September 10, 1800, acknowledging receiving a Chickasaw vocabulary and desire to record as many Native languages as possible; and a letter from Jefferson to Miami and Delaware Indians, January 8, 1803. Additional letters in the collection may pertain to Indigenous people in ways not yet documented. 
Collection: Thomas Jefferson papers, 1775-1825 (Mss.B.J35)