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Akimel O'odham
Alternate forms: Pima
Language(s): English | Tohono O'odham
Date: circa 1920s-1930s
Type:Text
Genre: Speeches
Extent: 52 pages
Description: The Pima materials in the ACLS collection consist of 1 item in the "Pima" section of the finding aid. This item is "Pima speeches," which has fourteen texts of speeches with interlinear translation. Most of the speeches relate to rain making and warfare.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Cherokee | Delaware | Yuchi | Creek | Seneca | Catawba | Choctaw
Alternate forms: Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1920-1951
Type:Text
Extent: 17 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Cherokee history and culture. This includes 24 pages of correspondence with Cherokee collaborators like Will West Long and Allen W. Long; 47 pages of field notes; notes and drafts relating to the preparation of Speck's manuscript on Cherokee music, dance, and drama; correspondence with colleagues such as George Herzog and Leonard Broom on Cherokee music, dance, and drama; correspondence with Franz Boas concerning copying of his Catawba texts and the Cherokee field work of Frans Olbrechts; correspondence with Will West Long about museum specimens; a biographical sketch of Will West Long; a postcard to Marian Godfrey regarding Cherokee Museum specimens; a letter to E. B. Norvell regarding silver trade goods and European imitations sold by the Cherokee; a bibliography of Cherokee sources, Publication 68650, listing 48 items, 1775-1922, prepared by the Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Affairs; a copy of a 1566-1567 letter (7 pages in English, with introduction by Speck) written by Juan Pardo relating early Spanish contact with the Cherokee; an account of the Cherokee and Delaware alliance given by Witapanóxwe (War Eagle and James Webber); a transcription of an 1818 letter written by Charles Hicks on the manners and customs of the Cherokees; correspondence about Cherokee basketry; correspondence regarding the accuracy of material in Robert Strange, Eoneguski, or the Cherokee Chief (1939); and 27 pages of miscellanous notes.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Dakota | Lakota
Alternate forms: Dakhota, Lakhota, Santee, Sioux, Teton, Yankton
Language(s): Dakota | English | Lakota
Date: 1838-1938 (bulk 1930s)
Type:Text
Extent: 7500+ pages, 3300+ slips; 2 notebooks
Description: The Dakota and Lakota materials in the ACLS collection consist of a very large and diverse set of materials, and are located in the "Dakota" section of the finding aid, which provides a detailed listing of all contents. The vast majority of these materials were composed and assembled by Ella Deloria during the 1930s, both recorded from contemporary speakers and from various historical manuscript sources, which were sent to Franz Boas. The bulk of Deloria's materials are stories and speeches in typewritten manuscript form, with a transcription in the original language, followed by a literal word-for-word translation, then a free translation in English, and a section of footnotes commenting upon the original text and translation decisions. Some of her manuscripts occasionally lack one or more of these sections. These texts cover a wide range of topics, from traditional narratives, historical accounts, autobiographical stories, descriptions of games, customs, ceremonies, etc., and speeches, often concerning political affairs and economic conditions from the late-19th century to the 1930s. Names of numerous speakers are also given in the manuscripts themselves. Some of these materials were published, but most were not. Note that Deloria identifies the language recorded by using the terms "Teton" for Lakota language, and "Santee" and "Yankton" to indicate Eastern and Western dialects of Dakota language. The collection also includes a much smaller amount of material by Boas and others, primarily consisting of linguistics notes and musical analysis. A full list of places where the material was recorded has not yet been assembled.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Ditidaht
Date: ca.1931-1972
Subject: Linguistics | Music
Extent: 1.5 linear feet
Description: The most noteworthy aspect of Mary Haas' Ditidaht file, stemming from fieldwork conducted with Morris Swadesh as her first fieldtrip, is a fairly detailed transcription of songs collected. Series 2 contains the transcriptions and Series 10 the cassette copies, while the original tapes are housed at the Indiana University Archives of Traditional Music. There is much overlap with Nuu-chah-nulth, as Haas frequently identified correspondences between them. A sizeable lexical file (Series 9) and correspondence with many, especially Edward Sapir and George Herzog (Series 1) may also be of interest.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Alabama | Apalachee | Biloxi | Chatot | Creek | Pascagoula | Taensa | Tunica | Caddo | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Chitimacha | Natchez | Ofo
Language(s): Mobilian | English
Date: 1933-1989
Subject: Linguistics | Music
Type:Text
Extent: 0.1 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas' Mobilian file is mostly comprised of correspondence with various researchers on the language (Series 1). Conversation with George Herzog includes mentions of Mobilian songs.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Tohono O'odham | Tepecano | Tepehuan | Akimel O'odham
Alternate forms: Papago, Pima
Language(s): English | Spanish | Tohono O'odham
Date: 1918-1955
Type:Text
Extent: 19 items
Description: Materials relating to John Alden Mason's interest in and research on Tohono O'odham language and culture, and particularly of his preparation of "The Language of the Papago of Arizona" (1950), informally referred to as his Papago grammar. Of particular interest will be materials by Juan Dolores, a Tohono O'odham man who both published his own work on Tohono O'odham (then called Papago) language and culture and also worked as a consultant for Mason, Alfred Kroeber, and others. Dolores items in this collection include three notebooks (numbered 10, 11, and 12, each with a table of contents) on Papago [Tohono O'odham] grammar apparently in the hand of Dolores with some additional notes by Mason; a table of contents listing myths and songs in notebook #14, which is missing; 138 pages of Papago [Tohono O'odham] texts with interlinear English and two copies of "The Sacred Case" myth in Northern Tepehuan with English translation. There is also a Papago [Tohono O'odham] text (in ink) without translation, attributed to Miguel Garcia, with corrections by Juan Dolores (in pencil). This collection also contains many of Mason's field notes and writings on Tohono O'odham, including a notebook of field notes on kinship terms, vocabulary, texts, comparisons with Tepecano, etc.; a notebook of songs with English interlinear translations, ethnographic and archaeological notes, Tepecano and Papago [Tohono O'odham] comparisons, etc.; two boxes comprising a linguistics card file of Papago [Tohono O'odham] words with English glosses, along with grammatical or other explanatory notes; miscellaneous notes on kinship terms, paradigms, and various other grammatical matters; a four-page summary of the general characteristics of Tohono O'odham without examples; drafts of an article by Mason giving Dolores' verb conjugations and a letter of George Herzog's comments on same, along with various notes, lists, analyses, etc., on Papago [Tohono O'odham] adjectives, nouns, verbs, pronouns, etc., much of it from Dolores; notes on Papago nominal stems ending in l, li, or ta based on list of stems from Dolores, with cognates from Pima, Northern Tepehuan, and Tepecano; four pages on Papago words with p and t, with English glosses; Tohono O'odham texts with interlinear translations in English and occasionally Spanish; and Mason's comments on William Kurath's "A brief introduction to Papago." Correspondents include George Herzog, who sent several pages of comments on Mason's Papago [Tohono O'odham] grammar; Alfred Kroeber regarding Mason's Papago [Tohono O'odham] grammar; Ruth Underhill regarding their shared interests in Papago [Tohono O'odham] culture and and Joe Grimes, Burton W. Bascom, Jr., George Herzog, Rev. Fr. Regis Rohder, O. F. M., and Dean Saxton regarding Mason's Papago [Tohono O'odham] grammar and the dispute with Morris Swadesh on whether there is one or two stop series in Papago [Tohono O'odham].
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Aztec | Huichol | Nahua | Tarahumara | Tepecano | Tepehuan | Tohono O'odham | Yaqui | Mayo | Akimel O'odham | Ute | Paiute | Hupa | Maya | Cora
Alternate forms: Cahita, Papago, Pima, Hiaki, Yoeme, Na:tini-xwe
Date: 1914-1962
Type:Text
Extent: 21 items
Description: Materials relating to John Alden Mason's interest and research in Uto-Aztecan languages and cultures. Items include notes and letters on Uto-Aztecan historical Mason's "Some initial phones and combinations in Utaztecan stems," an abstract and full text of a paper delivered at the Philadelphia meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1951); unattributed corresondence discussing that 1951 paper; Mason's correspondence with Edward Sapir regarding Mason's work on the Tepehuan, Papago [Tohono O'odham], Sonoran and Yaqui languages, Sapir's work on Paiute and Hupa, and mentioning Boas, Rivet, Speck, Spier, and Whorf; earlier correspondence with Sapir relaying Tepehuan, Tepecano, Papago [Tohono O'odham], and Nahua examples, data from Mason for Sapir's use in Uto-Aztecan comparative work, Sapir's comments on Mason's data and analysis, and Sapir's views on Uto-Aztecan historical Mason's corresondence with Ruth Benedict regarding work on Papago [Tohono O'odham], Pima, and Yaqui languages, an honorarium for Franz Boas, and Ruth Underhill's Papago Rites and ceremonies; correspondence with George Herzog regarding Tepehuan music and language, Pima-Papago language, and mentioning Franz Boas, Gene Weltfish, Edward Sapir, Ruth Underhill, Frank G. Speck, and others; correspondence with David H. Kelley regarding comparison of Polynesian and Uto-Aztecan languages (Kelly's dissertation); part of Kelley's Harvard University doctoral dissertation regarding the borrowing of Uto-Aztecan words into Polynesian; Benjamin Lee Whorf on Uto-Aztecan languages, including a table of relationships and a photo reproduction of Whorf's Azteco-Tanoan tree; correspondence with Whorf regarding Whorf's grant application to the Social Sciences Research Council to work on modern Nahuatl, and also touching on Uto-Aztecan phonology, Maya glyphs, Nahuatl, Papago [Tohono O'odham], Tepecano, Tepehuan, Yaqui, and subgrouping; and correspondence with Morris Swadesh regarding establishing an official Aztec alphabet, Swadesh's glotto-chronological work in Uto-Aztecan, disagreement between Mason and Swadesh over the number of stop series in Papago [Tohono O'odham], Swadesh's retraction (to be published in Word) of his criticisms of Mason's Papago [Tohono O'odham] grammar, and copies of letters from Swadesh to [Dean] Saxton and Andre Martinet. Undated linguistic materials include notes, Vocabularies, vocabularies, comparisons with notes about correspondences, comparative vocabularies, notes on numerical systems, cognates with English glosses, cognates with Spanish glosses, lexicostatistical compilations, etc. Languages represented (and not merely mentioned) include Huichol, El Nayar Cora, Nahuatl, Opata, Tarahumara, Tepecano, Tepehuan, Tohono O'odham, Tubar, Yaqui, and Mayo; it is unclear, however, which specific Tarahumara and Tepehuan languages are represented.
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)