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Alabama | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Koasati
Alternate forms: Alibamu, Coushatta
Date: 1934-1982
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas worked for a short period to document Alabama with several speakers on in the 1930s. The field notebook is in Series 2 Subseries ‘Multiple Languages' and includes comparisons with Koasati and Choctaw. Around 585 lexical items were obtained from this fieldwork, from which lexical slip files (Series 9) are derived. Haas also utilized John R. Swanton's dictionary of Alabama, and Alabama forms part of extensive Muskogean language comparisons, mostly in Series 2. There is also brief correspondence.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Alabama | Koasati | Natchez | Tunica | Atakapa | Chitimacha
Alternate forms: Coushatta
Date: 1936, undated
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas did not conduct her own fieldwork on Chitimacha, but amassed sizeable lexica from Morris Swadesh, mostly used for comparisons with Muskogean languages and linguistic isolates under the “Gulf” hypothesis. One especially large instance of comparison involving Chitimacha is an 1821-word long English-Natchez-Chitimacha word list, partially filled, in Series 2 Subseries Natchez. The majority of the comparative lexica are slip files, in Series 9. Besides this, of particular interest is sheet music of several Chitimacha songs, untitled, from an unknown source, in Series 2 Subseries Chitimacha. Haas also published an article on clans and kinship terminology with Natchez comparisons, notes and discussions of which are in Series 4 Subseries 3.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Alabama | Koasati
Alternate forms: Alibamu, Coushatta
Date: 1937-1981
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: Haas' Choctaw file is mostly the product of fieldwork among the Tunica of Louisiana during the 1930s, where Haas interviewed mother tongue speakers of Choctaw and her Tunica consultant Sesostrie Youchigant, and in Oklahoma during her Creek fieldtrips. Products of these first appear in the field notebooks and genealogy charts of Series 2 Subseries Choctaw and Tunica and are summarized in card files in Series 9. Strikingly, over 40 years elapsed between Haas' first Choctaw field notebook (Series 2) and her second. Choctaw featured heavily in Haas' comparison and reconstruction of Proto-Muskogean, regularly distributed throughout, particularly in Koasati materials. Comparative work also involved significant phonological and morphological analysis.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Atakapa | Biloxi | Catawba | Cherokee | Chitimacha | Choctaw | Chickasaw | Cocopah | Creek | Houma | Koasati | Lumbee | Natchez | Quapaw | Seminole | Shawnee | Timucua | Tunica | Tuscarora | Yuchi
Alternate forms: Cocopa, Coushatta
Language(s): English | Mobilian | Yuchi
Date: circa 1962-1983
Extent: 29 folders
Description: This entry is intended to encompass materials relating to James M. Crawford's interest in and study of Native North American languages. These items tend to be too general, too diffuse, or too vague in nature to easily fit under clear cultural or linguistic umbrellas. In Series III-D. Works by Crawford--Other, these items include "A Brief Account of the Indian Tribes of Northeast Georgia" (1962), a paper Crawford submitted in his Linguistics 170 class at Berkeley; Crawford's largely negative review of "Native Americans and Their Languages" by Roger Owen (1978); a typed copy of Crawford's "A Phonological Comparison of the Speech of Two Communities in California: East Bay and El Centro" (1964); typed drafts (with handwritten sections and penciled edits) of Crawford's "The Phonological Sequence ya in Words Pertaining to the Mouth in Southeastern and Other Indian Languages," which appeared in the volume “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages,” which he edited (1975); and three folders pertaining to Crawford's other work on the edited volume “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages,” including drafts, edits, notes, etc., of the preface and introduction Crawford wrote for the volume as well as exhaustive notes on bibliographic sources for several indigenous languages, including Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Natchez, Apalachee, Houma, Creek (Mukogean), Hitchiti, Seminole, Mobilian Jargon, Mikasuki, Alabama, Quapaw, Atakapa, Chitimacha, Timucua, Yuchi, Tuscarora, etc. (1970s). In Series IV-D. Research Notes & Notebooks—Other, items include a folder titled “Columbus Museum,” dated to July 1969, with research notes pertaining to Yuchi, Choctaw, Alabama-Koasati, Cherokee, etc., including the names and addresses of many potential language consultants for Yuchi, Shawnee, Catawba, Cherokee, etc., including some of the same people he visits in 1976 as described in “Mobilian Search—Notebook”; a folder labeled “Dialect Study (El Centro, East Bay),” with mostly handwritten notes and drafts pertaining to his "A Phonological Comparison of the Speech of Two Communities in California: East Bay and El Centro" (1964); “Haas Miscellany,” containing an Algonquian language chart attributed to Haas and two scraps of paper pertaining to her; “Miscellany,” containing notes on Maricopa, Digueno, Cocopa, Koasati, etc., as well as a plant specimen identified as Euphorbia chamaesyce; “Numerals from Indian Languages,” containing undated notes on numerals in Natchez, Muskogean, Hokan, Pomoan, Yukian, Wintun, Salinan, Esselen, Chumash, etc.; “Reconnaissance of Southeastern Indian Languages—Notebook,” a 1969 field notebook of a research trip mentioning numerous language consultants (Mrs. Rufus George, Yuchi and Cherokee, and Claude Medford, Creek?, prominent among them) and possible consultants, Choctaw, Seminole, Mikasuki, Cherokee, Lumbee, Creek, Chitimacha, Chickasaw, Shawnee, Yuchi, Tunica, Biloxi, Natchez, etc. people and languages, and commentary about relations between various groups, especially with Oklahoma groups [This item appears to be related to Crawford's research into the see also Mobilian materials]; “Mrs. Terrell—Notebook,” which contains a notebook of unidentified indigenous words elicited from consultants Mrs. Terrell and Mrs. Fletcher in April-May 1969; and “Unidentified,” containing sheets with a text in an unidentified indigenous language and its English translation. In Series VI. Course Material, there is a folder of materials relating to Crawford's coursework at Berkley, including “American Indian Languages--Linguistics 170 [1962]” as well as some Native North American material in an undated folder labeled “Seminars: 290a Theory; 290g American Indian Languages; Dialectology 216; 225; 130 Phonology—Notebook.” In Series II. Subject Files, there are materials relating to Crawford's research into to Mobilian, Cocopah, and Yuchi in “American Council of Learned Societies”; materials relating to his work in bilingual education under Title VII, particularly with the Yuchi in Oklahoma, in “Bilingual Education”; news clippings related to the work of Crawford and others in “Clippings”; records of payments to indigenous language consultants in “Informants' Receipts”; materials relating to Crawford's work with the Southeastern Indian Language Project via application materials in “National Science Foundation #1” and “National Science Foundation #2”; one folder of readers' reviews (pre-publication) and another folder of post-publication reviews of “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages”; and a grant proposal to do field work to study Yuchi in Sapulpa, Oklahoma in “University of Georgia—Grant Proposal,” in which Crawford outlines not only his proposed study but some historical information about Yuchi people and language. Finally, Series I. Correspondence contains many exchanges about Crawford's work on Native North American languages. Most of this correspondence revolves around Crawford's submission of papers and articles to academic conferences and publishers. The most interesting items include a letter from Ilona May (Thomas) Keyaite, the daughter of a Cocopah consultant; letters and notes about 1735 drawings of Yuchi and Creek Indians in Georgia in a folder labelled “Sturtevant, William C.” [1977-1978]. This series also includes various letters and notes from the University of Georgia recognizing Crawford's professional accomplishments and awards, and a few letters documenting the difficult publication history of the volume on Southeastern Indian Languages.
Collection: James M. Crawford Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.66)

Koasati
Alternate forms: Coushatta
Language(s): Alabama | English | Koasati
Date: 1934
Subject: Linguistics | Stories
Type:Text
Extent: 1 notebook
Description: The Koasati materials in the ACLS collection consist of a single notebook in the "Koasati" section of the finding aid, recorded by Mary Haas and Morris Swadesh. This contains a page of biographical and locational data, 575 Koasati forms with English equivalents, and 2 texts with interlinear translation.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Koasati
Alternate forms: Coushatta
Language(s): Koasati | English
Date: 1930s-1980s
Type:Text
Extent: 1.75 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas' Koasati file is quite extensive. Field notes from the 1930s can be found in Series 2 Subseries ‘Multiple Languages' and ‘Koasati', and include several interlinear texts, notably a transcription of a handwritten letter in the language between Jackson Langley and Louisa Carson. Notes on Haas' Oklahoma consultants also feature in Series 2. There are several versions of a 124-page typeset dictionary with no attribution, also in Series 2. A great many lexical slips can be found in Series 9, as well as a 575+ item wordlist in Series 2, with frequent comparison to Muskogean and “Gulf” languages as part of Haas' historical linguistics efforts. In addition there are many works by others on Koasati, in Series 8.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Natchez | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Alabama | Koasati | Tunica | Atakapa | Chitimacha
Alternate forms: Coushatta
Date: ca.1934-1960s
Type:Text
Extent: 5 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas' Natchez file is one of her largest, and relatively little was published from it during her lifetime. She conducted fieldwork with Watt Sam, Nancy Raven and Peggy Leaf, captured in twelve field notebooks in Series 2. A large volume of texts were elicited here and later typeset, with different versions also present in Series 2. Particularly extensive is Haas' set of Natchez lexical slips, amounting to 7 boxes (likely over 10,000 slips), including (in addition to full alphabetizations) grammatical analyses and comparisons with other languages. Haas' fieldwork on Natchez and other neighboring languages was used as partial evidence for the Gulf hypothesis, for which comparisons are abundant also in Series 9. Additionally, Haas corresponded with a large number of linguists (Series 1).
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Alabama | Koasati | Natchez | Tunica | Atakapa | Chitimacha
Date: 1930s-1996
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 2 linear feet
Description: A considerable amount of Haas' research from the 1950s onwards involved identifying language family relationships and constructing proto-languages. Comparisons, both lexical and phonological, between Muskogean and hypothesized Gulf languages and their proto-forms are abundant especially throughout Series 2 and Series 9. Haas made annotations to others' publications, created bibliographies, and developed family trees and lexica of both Proto-Muskogean and Proto-Golf and a wide variety of Muskogean languages, including several lexica from multiple historical sources in Series 9. Examples of the above are to be found across much of the collection, often in folders of specific Muskogean and Gulf languages. See individual cultures and languages for specifics.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Tunica | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Alabama | Koasati | Natchez | Atakapa | Chitimacha | Avoyelles
Alternate forms: Coushatta, Avoyel
Date: ca.1933-1960s
Extent: 3 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas conducted extensive fieldwork on Tunica with last speaker Sesostrie Youchigant, subsequently publishing a grammar as her PhD dissertation, and later texts and a dictionary. Fourteen field notebooks can be found in the dedicated subseries in Series 2, along with abundant grammatical and lexical notes and sheet music. Tunica was an integral part of Haas' comparative work on the Gulf hypothesis, so extensive comparisons can be found, especially in the lexical slip files of Series 9. Haas' Tunica work also contains more ethnographic notes than most of her files. Photographs of Sesostrie Youchigant are present in Series 11 and can be viewed at the Digital Library.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)