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Lenape | Cherokee
Language(s): English
Date: 1788-1789; February 3, 1808; circa 1809; June 23, 1819; July 5, 1819; May 29, 1826; August 11, 1834; February 9, 1835; March 14, 1839; December 31, 1882; 1926; Undated;
Type:Text
Extent: 13 items
Description: Relavent materials can be found in the finding aid under the specific dates listed. Various materials pertaining to miscellaneous American Indian peoples. Topics include Indian songs; Du Ponceau's "Memoir on the Indian Languages"; ancient and lost Indian languages; Heckewelder's missionary efforts among Indians; the book collection of John and Anna R. Gambold, missionaries to the Cherokees; questionable Snake Creek artifacts; busts of Indians; mineral and shell specimens; speculations on the origin of American Indians; Gallatin's documents for collections of vocabularies forwarded to E. Lincoln, John Pickering, S. Wood, Ebenezer Harris, James Rochelle, and Peter S. Du Ponceau; grizzly bears captured by Indians; Schoolcraft's projected volumes on Indians; Barton's "An essay towards a natural history of the North American Indians"; and Nuttall's Summary of paper "Fresh Light on Ancient American Civilizations and Calendars."
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Lenape | Cherokee | Kickapoo | Kaw | Osage
Language(s): English
Date: 1781-1844
Type:Text
Extent: .5 linear feet
Description: A pioneer in ethnographic and linguistic studies of the American Indian and one of the most active members of the American Philosophical Society, Peter Stephen Du Ponceau helped to establish the American Philosophical Society's reputation as one of the world's foremost centers for the study of American Indians and their languages. The Peter Stephen Du Ponceau Collection consists of correspondence on legal matters, Indian linguistics, silk culture, maritime law, the American Philosophical Society, and various publications of the early nineteenth century. The collection also includes several essays by Du Ponceau, most of which deal with maritime law. Materials in this collection that relate explicitly to Native peoples include a letter from Du Ponceau to John Vaughan discussing the merits of John Heckewelder's "Account...of the Indian Nations" (1818); a letter from John Adams informing Du Ponceau that his and Heckewelder's studies on Native Americans have diminished certain prejudices he (Adams) had against them, and mentioning certain works which might be of interest in Du Ponceau's study of universal language (1819); another letter from Adams relative to lost languages in general and Adams' desire to see Heckewelder's account of his missionary labors with Indians (1819); a letter from Du Ponceau to Marc-Antione Jullien de Paris mentioning the imposture John Dunn Hunter, who claimed to have been captured by Kickapoo Indians and raised among the Kickapoo, Kansa (Kaw), and Osage (1826); another letter to Jullien de Paris mentioning a review of his Delaware grammar (1828); a letter from William Shorey Coodey (Cherokee) forwarding a book in the Cherokee language translated by S.A. Worcester and Elias Boudinot (1836); and a letter from William Hickling Prescott thanking Du Ponceau for his work on Indian languages and mentioning John Vaughan and John Pickering (1839). There are also two letters from linguist Albert Gallatin, one that informs Du Ponceau of his progress on the Indian vocabularies and another that includes a newspaper clipping defending Gallatin against those who assailed his reputation. See the finding aid for an itemized list of the collection.
Collection: Peter Stephen Du Ponceau Collection (Mss.B.D92p)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Chippewa
Language(s): English | Chippewa
Date: 1826
Type:Text
Extent: 3 volumes, 29 watercolor illustrations
Description: A record of a journey undertaken by Thomas L. McKenney and Lewis Cass, from Washington, D.C., to Fond du Lac, Wisc., to negotiate a treaty with the Chippewa and other Indians. McKenney, the Superindenant of Indian Affairs, includes an account of travel on the Great Lakes and a description of the "character" and customs of the Chippewa Indians, an account of the treaty of Fond du Lac, and a vocabulary of the Algic or Chippewa language. The manuscript, a fair copy of the original sent to a London publisher, is illustrated throughout with watercolor sketches of scenes and persons. It was originally published in Baltimore in 1827. Schoolcraft-Gallatin Chippewa vocabulary appears at beginning, but the manuscript lacks appendices found in the printed text. Watercolors are different in small details, superior in color to printed text.
Collection: Sketches of a Tour to the Lakes (Mss.917.7.M19)