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Huastec | Purépecha | Tarahumara | Otomi
Language(s): English | Spanish | French
Date: 1802-1899
Type:Text
Extent: 22 items
Description: Materials relating to the indigenous cultures and languages of Mexico. Includes requests to view or borrow materials at APS, particularly in the Poinsett Collection; introductions of scholars who wish to view Mexican materials to the Librarian or other appropriate official of the time (including John Vaughan and George Ord); solicitations for donations of Mexican materials, particularly from Joel R. Poinsett; donation of linguistic and other materials from Jose Joaquin de Ferrer;s relating to indigenous cultures and languages of Mexico, particularly Brinton's papers on Nagualism and on Fuegian languages [Brinton (1892) and Brinton (1894)], Valentini's manuscript on Mexican calendar stone, and linguistic work by Albert Gallatin; Mexican antiquities at other institutions such as the Academy of Natural Sciencies, Princeton, and the Peabody Museum; and Samuel Morton's offer to George Ord to exchange books for a Mexican skull he used for a plate in his Crania Americana (1839), and which he now wishes to add to his collection. Specific cultures or languages mentioned include Huastec, Otomi, Tarascan, Tarahumara, and Mexican. Individuals mentioned include Ephraim G. Squier, Bishop Anders, Mr. Frank, Professor Matile, Mr. Bagely, Thomas Sully, Jean-Frédéric Waldeck, and Lord Kingsborough.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Lenape | Cherokee
Language(s): English
Date: 1788-1789; February 3, 1808; circa 1809; June 23, 1819; July 5, 1819; May 29, 1826; August 11, 1834; February 9, 1835; March 14, 1839; December 31, 1882; 1926; Undated;
Type:Text
Extent: 13 items
Description: Relavent materials can be found in the finding aid under the specific dates listed. Various materials pertaining to miscellaneous American Indian peoples. Topics include Indian songs; Du Ponceau's "Memoir on the Indian Languages"; ancient and lost Indian languages; Heckewelder's missionary efforts among Indians; the book collection of John and Anna R. Gambold, missionaries to the Cherokees; questionable Snake Creek artifacts; busts of Indians; mineral and shell specimens; speculations on the origin of American Indians; Gallatin's documents for collections of vocabularies forwarded to E. Lincoln, John Pickering, S. Wood, Ebenezer Harris, James Rochelle, and Peter S. Du Ponceau; grizzly bears captured by Indians; Schoolcraft's projected volumes on Indians; Barton's "An essay towards a natural history of the North American Indians"; and Nuttall's Summary of paper "Fresh Light on Ancient American Civilizations and Calendars."
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Muscogee | Yuchi | Natchez | Dakota
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): English
Date: June 8, 1785; May 20, 1826; Undated;
Type:Text
Extent: 3 items
Description: 1) Letter from Elbert to Major General Lachlan McIntosh regarding meeting to ascertain boundary between Creek Indians and Georgia. 2) Letter from Gallatin to Peter S. Du Ponceau sending transcribed vocabularies of Yuchi, Natchez, and Muscogee; also sending a Sioux grammar to Colonel Thomas L. McKenny, Office of Indian Affairs. 3) Legal brief by the plaintiff's attorney in a Creek Indian land dispute before the Supreme Court of Alabama-Sally Sadiga vs. Richard DeMarcus and Peter Hufman.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Haida
Language(s): English
Date: May 28, 1846; 1950
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Gallatin's letter to Messrs. Lea and Blanchard regarding returning their copy of Horatio Hale on Indian languages west of the Rocky Mountains which Gallatin borrowed to study. Trying to get Library of Congress to loan him another. Barbeau's "List of photos...research in whaler's and clipper ships' activities" including New England, New York, and Pennsylvania materials, including tombstones of eighteenth century; Northwest Coast carvings and masks; Haida argillite carvings; Eastern Woodlands baskets and bark vessels, etc. Descriptive catalogue of items from Peabody Museum of Salem, Harvard, Yale, American Museum of Natural History, U.S. National Museum, Queen's University of Kingston, Ontario.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Lenape | Cherokee | Kickapoo | Kaw | Osage
Language(s): English
Date: 1781-1844
Type:Text
Extent: .5 linear feet
Description: A pioneer in ethnographic and linguistic studies of the American Indian and one of the most active members of the American Philosophical Society, Peter Stephen Du Ponceau helped to establish the American Philosophical Society's reputation as one of the world's foremost centers for the study of American Indians and their languages. The Peter Stephen Du Ponceau Collection consists of correspondence on legal matters, Indian linguistics, silk culture, maritime law, the American Philosophical Society, and various publications of the early nineteenth century. The collection also includes several essays by Du Ponceau, most of which deal with maritime law. Materials in this collection that relate explicitly to Native peoples include a letter from Du Ponceau to John Vaughan discussing the merits of John Heckewelder's "Account...of the Indian Nations" (1818); a letter from John Adams informing Du Ponceau that his and Heckewelder's studies on Native Americans have diminished certain prejudices he (Adams) had against them, and mentioning certain works which might be of interest in Du Ponceau's study of universal language (1819); another letter from Adams relative to lost languages in general and Adams' desire to see Heckewelder's account of his missionary labors with Indians (1819); a letter from Du Ponceau to Marc-Antione Jullien de Paris mentioning the imposture John Dunn Hunter, who claimed to have been captured by Kickapoo Indians and raised among the Kickapoo, Kansa (Kaw), and Osage (1826); another letter to Jullien de Paris mentioning a review of his Delaware grammar (1828); a letter from William Shorey Coodey (Cherokee) forwarding a book in the Cherokee language translated by S.A. Worcester and Elias Boudinot (1836); and a letter from William Hickling Prescott thanking Du Ponceau for his work on Indian languages and mentioning John Vaughan and John Pickering (1839). There are also two letters from linguist Albert Gallatin, one that informs Du Ponceau of his progress on the Indian vocabularies and another that includes a newspaper clipping defending Gallatin against those who assailed his reputation. See the finding aid for an itemized list of the collection.
Collection: Peter Stephen Du Ponceau Collection (Mss.B.D92p)

Tuscarora | Seneca | Dakota | Haudenosaunee | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Miami | Otomi | Powhatan | Mohawk | Natchez | San Felipe | Nottoway | Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Winnebago, Sioux, Keres
Language(s): English
Date: 1801-1843
Type:Text
Extent: 33 items
Description: Correspondence, largely from Peter S. du Ponceau to Albert Gallatin, regarding legal and political matters, Indian languages and linguistics, philological matters, and the American Philosophical Society. Specific topics include exchanges of publications and manuscripts between the two men; the creation of a map of Indian languages; the government's collecting of Indian vocabularies and du Ponceau's refusal to supply Historical and Literary Committee material to the government, believing that the committee rather than the government should undertake the collection and publication of Indian materials; methods of seeking data on languages, and the difficulties of sentence for testing problems of comparative Vocabularies;s both already published and in progess, such as Eliot's Grammar, Barton (1797), Pickering (1820), Hodgson on the Berber, Najera (1837), Zeisberger (1830), Gallatin (1836), Prichard (1813), several of du Ponceau's works, etc.; du Ponceau's acceptance of copies of Gallatin's Synopsis, with a jab at its Worcester (rather than APS) the fate of the manuscript for du Ponceau's prize essay: the printer bankrupt, difficulties in getting manuscript returned, and du Ponceau has no full copy; of du Ponceau's study of Chinese;s and the Transactions of the Historical and Literary Committee; du Ponceau's acceptance of vocabularies on behalf of the the state of European linguistics; Pickering's alphabet for Indian languages; Carib women's vs. men's the opposition founding of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, and du Ponceau's efforts to make peace by submitting his translation of Vater's Enquiry for them to publish; illnesses and deaths in du Ponceau's family; and du Ponceau's age, health, and failing eyesight. Other individuals mentioned include Franklin, Rush, Rittenhouse, Jefferson, Cass, Schoolcraft, Long, Ebeling, Adelung, Klaproth, Balbi, Humboldt, Volney, and Heckewelder. Originals at the New York Historical Society.
Collection: Peter Stephen Du Ponceau letters, 1801-1843, to Albert Gallatin (Mss.Film.541)