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Otomi | Chitimacha | Atakapa | Cherokee | Osage | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Nottoway | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | Nanticoke | A'aninin | Miami | Mi'kmaq | Seminole | Quapaw | Yuchi | Lenape | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Seneca | Mohawk | Onondaga | Cayuga | Oneida | Tuscarora | Natchez | Wyandot | Creek | Mohican | Mohegan
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Huron-Wyandot, Atsina, Gros Ventre, Micmac, Lenape
Date: 1798-1821
Type:Text
Extent: 219 pages
Description: This volume contains extracts of Benjamin Smith Barton's "New Views of the Origin of the Tribes and Nations of America" (Philadelphia, 1797), with additions by Peter S. Du Ponceau. The bulk of the volume is comprised of word list of 54 words with equivalents listed in a range of 50-70 languages. While Barton listed no authority, Du Ponceau cited sources. Languages with words listed include Chitimacha, Atakapa, Cherokee, Osage, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Nottoway, Kansa, Omaha, Dakota, Pawnee, Nanticoke, Gros Ventres, Miami, Mi'kmaq, Seminole, Quapaw, Yuchi, Delaware, Ojibwe, Shawnee, Seneca, Mohawk, Onondaga, Cayuga, Oneida, Tuscarora, Natches, Wyandot, Creek, Mahican, Mohegan, and many others. The word list includes the terms for God, heaven, and sky, as well as various terms relating to kinship, parts of the body, weather, and more. The volume also includes notes on sounds of the Otomi (Othomi) observations on declension; observations about the Omaha, Kansa, Oto, Arkansas, and Missouri languages; and notes on symbol and sound. Also includes a newspaper clipping of a review (in German) of Barton's "New Views" that appeared in "Göttingische Anzeigen von gelehrten Sachen," June 17, 1799.
Collection: A comparative vocabulary of Indian languages (Mss.497.B28)

Natchez | Choctaw | Chickasaw | Yuchi | Lenape | Cherokee | Creek | Osage
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1792-1897
Extent: 28 items
Description: Items relating to materials about the Native peoples of Eastern North America. Topics include papers and articles, particularly those considered for publication (on the relation of pentagonal dodecahedron found near Marietta, Ohio, to shamanism; memoir on aboriginal monuments; memoir of Dr. Charles D. Meigs on bones and burial customs; multiple items regarding a letter from S. P. Hullihen to Dr. Richard Harlan regarding inscription on a stone found at Grave Creek near Wheeling, and Thomas Townsend's claim to prior publication rights to Grave Creek inscription; Caleb Forshey's paper describing a great mound in Adams County, Mississippi; Cushing's publication on exploration of ancient key dwellers' remains on the Gulf Coast of Florida; a response to Henry Phillips' article on supposed runic inscriptions at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia); requests for information or materials (Samuel Miller's request for copies of designated Indian vocabularies of Delaware, Cherokee, Creek, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Osage, for training missionaries of United Foreign Missionary Society); donations to APS ("curiosities" taken from Indian grave near Cincinnati; relics and fossil shells found in Huntingdon County, West Virginia;"western productions"); Peter S. du Ponceau's work on Southern Indian languages and customs (including Creek, Natchez, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Yuchi), Indian vocabularies, and for APS; information from Judge William C. Frazer (Wisconsin Territory, Superior County), concerning discovery of burned bricks in Aztalan Mound, Jefferson County, Wisconsin; Cutler's estimation of age of Ohio mounds referred to in Barton (1787) using tree-ring dating; sketch of the plan of an ancient work three miles southeast of Lexington (Kentucky); American Antiquarian Society's plans to publish a volume on mounds based on Caleb Atwater's data; and comparative vocabularies of British Columbia tribes. Other individuals mentioned include Murray, Duralde, Colonel Smith, Benjamin Hawkins, Robley Dunglison, Isaac Lea, Benjamin W. Richards, George M. Wharton, Nathaniel Ware, General Wayne, Dr. Tolmie, George M. Dawson, and Abelard Tomlinson.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Osage
Language(s): English
Date: January 13, 1826; March 13, 1958
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Du Ponceau to Marc Antoine Jullien de Paris regarding Cass' article in the North American Review exposing John D. Hunter as a fraud; had stated privately that this was the case in 1822. Encloses news clipping of anonymous letter (by Du Ponceau) of 1822 which exposes Hunter on linguistic grounds. [N.B. Du Ponceau had been fooled by Hunter in New York, but had found he lacked knowledge of Osage in later visit to Philadelphia.] Anderson to Carl P. Russell regarding plan of Fort Osage in original of Clark's diary [#2607] and location of other Clark items dealing with Fort Osage.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Lenape | Cherokee | Kickapoo | Kaw | Osage
Language(s): English
Date: 1781-1844
Type:Text
Extent: .5 linear feet
Description: A pioneer in ethnographic and linguistic studies of the American Indian and one of the most active members of the American Philosophical Society, Peter Stephen Du Ponceau helped to establish the American Philosophical Society's reputation as one of the world's foremost centers for the study of American Indians and their languages. The Peter Stephen Du Ponceau Collection consists of correspondence on legal matters, Indian linguistics, silk culture, maritime law, the American Philosophical Society, and various publications of the early nineteenth century. The collection also includes several essays by Du Ponceau, most of which deal with maritime law. Materials in this collection that relate explicitly to Native peoples include a letter from Du Ponceau to John Vaughan discussing the merits of John Heckewelder's "Account...of the Indian Nations" (1818); a letter from John Adams informing Du Ponceau that his and Heckewelder's studies on Native Americans have diminished certain prejudices he (Adams) had against them, and mentioning certain works which might be of interest in Du Ponceau's study of universal language (1819); another letter from Adams relative to lost languages in general and Adams' desire to see Heckewelder's account of his missionary labors with Indians (1819); a letter from Du Ponceau to Marc-Antione Jullien de Paris mentioning the imposture John Dunn Hunter, who claimed to have been captured by Kickapoo Indians and raised among the Kickapoo, Kansa (Kaw), and Osage (1826); another letter to Jullien de Paris mentioning a review of his Delaware grammar (1828); a letter from William Shorey Coodey (Cherokee) forwarding a book in the Cherokee language translated by S.A. Worcester and Elias Boudinot (1836); and a letter from William Hickling Prescott thanking Du Ponceau for his work on Indian languages and mentioning John Vaughan and John Pickering (1839). There are also two letters from linguist Albert Gallatin, one that informs Du Ponceau of his progress on the Indian vocabularies and another that includes a newspaper clipping defending Gallatin against those who assailed his reputation. See the finding aid for an itemized list of the collection.
Collection: Peter Stephen Du Ponceau Collection (Mss.B.D92p)