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Clackamas
Alternate forms: Klackamas
Language(s): English | Chinook, Upper
Date: 1890-1894; 1920
Type:Text
Extent: 2 pages; 2 notebooks; circa 65 slips
Description: The Clackamas materials in the ACLS collection include two items in the "Clackamas" section of the finding aid: a 2-page fragment of a Clackamas-English vocabulary, and a brief slip file contaiining kinship terms. Two notebooks recorded by Franz Boas in 1890 which partially contain Clackamas texts and vocabularies are found in the "Field notes on Chinookan and Salishan languages and Gitamat], Molala, and Masset " in the "Chinook" section of the finding aid. In the "Kathlamet" section, the "Kathlamet lexicon" includes some comparative Clackamas terms.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Hopi
Language(s): English | Hopi
Date: 1883-1892, 1920-1924, 1929-1932, 1936, 1938-1940
Extent: 24 notebooks, 300+ pages
Description: The Hopi materials in the Elsie Clews Parsons papers consist of a large amount of material found in several different section of the collection. In Subcollection I, Series II, "Notes, manuscripts, etc.", item 18 includes the notebooks of Alexander Stephen from 1885-1892; item 51 includes a significant number of photographs from Hopi communities from the period of 1918-1926; and items 46 and 61 also contain briefer manuscript materials relating to Hopi ceremonies. In Subcollection II, Series I, "Professional Correspondence", a number of Correspondences pertain to Hopi matters, particularly Parsons' correspondence with Franz Boas, Ruth Bunzel, Frederick Dellenbaugh, C. Daryll Forde, Robert H. Lowie, Leslie White, and Benjamin Whorf. In Subcollection II, Series III, "Lectures and Manuscripts", there are proofs and drafts related to Parsons' publication of Alexander Stephen's "Hopi Journal." In Subcollection II, Series IV, "Research Notes" there is a large number of Parsons' field notebooks from multiple visits to different Hopi communities. Some portion of this material may be restricted due to cultural sensitivity or privacy concerns.
Collection: Elsie Clews Parsons papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.29)

Iñupiat
Alternate forms: Eskimo, Iñupiaq
Date: 1899; 1905; 1935
Extent: 50 pages; 18 drawings
Description: The Iñupiat materials in the ACLS collection consist of three items in the "Eskimo" section of the finding aid. Boas' "Comparative word list of Alaskan Eskimo, Siberian Eskimo, and Chukchee" includes vocabulary from Utqiagvik ("Point Barrow") and the Seward Peninsula. Alfred Francis' "Kungmit Eskimo vocabulary" consists of an approximately 300-word list recorded at Kotzebue, including terms for animals, kinship, parts of the body, natural objects, and other terms. Finally, Boas' "Drawings for 'Property Marks of Alaskan Eskimo'" includes drawing from which illustrations for Boas' 1899 article on this topic were made.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

A'wa'etłala | K'ómoks | Da'naxda'xw | Dzawada'enuxw | Gopinuxw | Gusgimukw | Gwa'sala | Gwatsinuxw | Gwawa'enuxw | Kwakwaka'wakw | Kwagu'ł | Kwikwasutinuxw | Ławitsis | Ma'a̱mtagila | Mamalilikala | Nak'waxda'xw | Namgis | Tłatłasikwala | Wiwekam | Wiweqayi
Alternate forms: Gwasilla, Gwawaenuk, K'omoks, Koskimo, Kwakiutl, Kwicksutaineuk, Laich-kwil-tach, Lekwiltok, Nakoaktok, Nakwoktak, Nimpkish, Quatsino, Tanakteuk, Tlowitsis, Tsawataineuk, Weiwaikai, Weiwaikum
Language(s): English | German | Kwak'wala
Date: 1893-1951
Extent: Approx. 10,000 loose pages, 10 notebooks, 7000+ cards, 10+ maps
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw materials in the ACLS collection are located predominantly in the "Kwakiutl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing of all materials. Some of the larger individaul sets of materials listed within this section also have their own specific tables of contents (available upon request) detailing their often highly diverse contents. Overall, the vast majority of the material is made of of 1) manuscripts sent to Boas by George Hunt from the 1890s to the 1930s, frequently in both Kwak'wala and English, covering a very broad range of Kwakwaka'wakw history, culture, languages, customs, and traditions; and 2) field work materials recorded by Boas and Boas' own analyses of material sent by Hunt, covering a similar range of topics. Additional materials by other individuals focus especially on linguistic and ethnographic matters. Also see the "Kwakiutl materials, Franz Boas Papers," for information on the correspondence between Boas and Hunt, which gives additional context to the materials in the ACLS collection.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

A'wa'etłala | K'ómoks | Da'naxda'xw | Dzawada'enuxw | Gopinuxw | Gusgimukw | Gwa'sala | Gwatsinuxw | Gwawa'enuxw | Kwakwaka'wakw | Kwagu'ł | Kwikwasutinuxw | Ławitsis | Lekwiltok | Ma'a̱mtagila | Mamalilikala | Nak'waxda'xw | Namgis | Tłatłasikwala | Wiwekam | Wiweqayi
Alternate forms: Gwasilla, Gwawaenuk, K'omoks, Koskimo, Kwakiutl, Kwicksutaineuk, Laich-kwil-tach, Nakoaktok, Nakwoktak, Nimpkish, Quatsino, Tanakteuk, Tlowitsis, Tsawataineuk, Weiwaikai, Weiwaikum
Language(s): English | German | Kwak'wala
Date: 1885-1942
Type:Text
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: This collection contains the bulk of correspondence between Franz Boas and his professional colleagues, though there are also other Boas collections in the library. The correspondents listed above contain some correspondence related to the culture or language listed in this entry. The largest correspondence is that of George Hunt, which took place from 1894-1933 and runs around 1000 pages. A full index for this correspondence is available upon request, and includes cross references to the locations (in other APS collections) of fieldwork and other materials referred to in the letters. Other correspondences primarily about Kwakwaka'wakw matters are that of the Cadwalladers, Dan Cranmer, John Fillmore (concerning the transcription of Boas' cylinder recordings of Kwakiutl songs), Alfred I. Hall, and C. J. Nowell. In the finding aid listings for some of these correspondents, the individual letters pertaining to this culture or language will be identified by a subject heading, though for some correspondents this indexing has not yet been completed. Some letters may contain only brief mentions of work being conducted in relation to the topic. Some additional correspondences in this collection that have not yet been indexed may also contain additional material.
Collection: Franz Boas Papers (Mss.B.B61)

Laguna
Alternate forms: Kawaika
Date: 1919-1925
Type:Text
Extent: 477 pages, 25 notebooks, 9600 slips
Description: The Laguna materials in the ACLS collection of several items, primarily located in the "Laguna" section of the finding aid. There is a large set of 24 field notebooks recorded by Franz Boas containing texts, and linguistic and ethnographic notes, some written German shorthand. Additional materials derive from this field work, including extensive lexicons, additional linguistic analysis, texts, and discussion of kinship terms. In the "Keresan" section of the finding aid, see also Boas' additional Vocabularies and comparative Keresan lexical files, in which Laguna material is compared with Cochiti.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Innu | Cree | Delaware | Seneca | Mohawk | Haudenosaunee | Penobscot | Yurok | Yana | Arapaho | Cheyenne | Paiute | Coahuiltecan | Dene
Alternate forms: Montagnais, Lenape, Athabaskan, Athapascan
Language(s): English
Date: 1911-1934
Type:Text
Extent: 4 folders
Description: Materials relating to linguistics. Includes an undated 4-page list of 34 questions on culturally patterned aspects of language attributed to Hallowell; correspondence with Boas relating to the American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Research in American Native Languages, principally consisting of reports on grants and their progress (1927-1934); and two folders containing 30 letters from Sapir (1911-1924). The Sapir letters cover a range of topics including Northeast material-culture specimens;s of Speck;s of Sapir; linguistic field work among the Montagnais [Innu], Cree, Delaware, Seneca, Mohawk, and Penobscot; relation of Algonquian and Wiyot-Yurok; on Yana (with Ishi); Arapaho-Cheyenne; Sapir's paper on Levirate marriage; Yurok kinship; a scheme to test response of anthropologists to an Indian design; work on his grammar of Paiute; reduction of language stocks to 6 (1920); his work on Subtiaba; relationships in and around Hokan-Coahuiltecan, and some discussion of migrations, seeing Athabaskan as late arrival. Discussion of colleagues: Mechling, Barbeau, Heye, Radin, Dixon, Skinner, Goldenweiser, Gifford, Frachtenberg, Reichard, Goddard, Boas, Hawkes.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Muscogee
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): English | Muscogee
Date: 1930s-1970s
Extent: 7 linear feet
Description: The Muscogee (Creek) materials in the Mary R. Haas Papers are extensive, with materials found in most sections of the collection. In Series I, see especially the correspondence with professional colleagues such as Franz Boas, Jack Martin, William Sturtevant, and others regarding the Muscogee language, as well as correspondence with her Muscogee-speaking consultants, such as James Hill and Watt Sam. Other relevant letters in Series 1 include a "Creek language" subject heading listed with the item. The most extensive amount of material can be found in the "Creek" section of Series 2. This section contains 10 boxes of material. Prominent materials in this section include Haas's original 22 field notebooks, containing vocabulary elicitation, stories, and accompanying notes, recorded in 1941 in Eufaula, Oklahoma, Nonnie Scott, Arthur E. Raiford, James Hill, Jim Marshall, Jim Bullet, Don Starr, Peter Ewing, John Toney, Tom Tiger, Wesley Tauyan, Ollie Tauyan, John Thompson, Tom Red, Johnson Late, and Dan Cooke, plus others only identified with initials; 6 notebooks by James Hill, writing in the Mvskoke writing system, containing stories; Victor Riste's 4 field notebooks from 1931, containing stories and elicited vocabulary with multiple consultants listed; various linguistic notes and other materials derived from the above-listed notebooks; pedagogical materials for Muscogee language learning; a range materials on Muscogee (Creek) history; and more. Series 3 contains a small number of items labelled "Creek." In Series 9, there is additional extensive files linguistic material in the form of lexicons and grammatical notes, as well as ethnographic notes. Some Creek terms are also included in files comparing it with other languages. Lastly, in Series 10, there is a brief "Creek Texts" audio recording from the 1970s, as well as "Creek Text and Conversation" with Watt Sam and Nancy Raven in 1931.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Nlaka'pamux
Alternate forms: Thompson
Language(s): English | Nlaka'pamuctsin
Date: 1885, 1898-1918
Extent: 1000+ loose pages, 500+ slips, 23 notebooks, 1 map
Description: The Nlaka'pamux materials in the ACLS collection are located primarily in the "Thompson" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing. They consist predominantly of ethnographic, historical, linguistic, and botanical materials recorded and assembled by James Teit from the 1890s to the 1910s and sent to Boas. Many of the material listed in the finding aid, especially those of larger size, are composed of many shorter, distinct individual manuscripts on specific topics that were gathered together into the large sets of manuscripts and assigned general titles such as "Thompson materials" or "Salish ethnographic materials." Many additional Nlaka'pamux materials can also be found in the "Salish" section of the finding aid, often intermixed among information on neighboring Interior Salish peoples. In both of these sections there are also some additional materials, generally linguistic, by Franz Boas and others.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Omaha | Ponca | Lakota
Language(s): English | Lakota | Omaha-Ponca
Date: 1928-1930
Type:Text
Extent: 344 pages, approx. 1,600 cards and slips
Description: The Omaha and Ponda materials in the ACLS collection consist primarily of four items located in the "Omaha" section of the finding aid. The first materials are texts and grammatical notes recorded by Francis La Flesche, including texts with literal and free translations, and terms of relationship among the Omahas. Also includes correspondence with Franz Boas. The materials by Boas, which were based on prior source, including La Flesche, consist of a word list comparing Omaha to Lakota, and a lexicon of approximately 1600 word slips. In the "Iowa" section of the finding aid, Frida Hahn's manuscript grammar, "The Ponca Language," is found among Gordon Marsh's Iowa materials.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)