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Chehalis | Puyallup
Date: 1882, circa 1890; 1897, 1927-1936
Type:Text
Extent: 1800+ loose pages, 15 notebooks, circa 8000 slips
Description: The Chehalis materials in the ACLS collection consist of a large volume of material spread across numerous items in the "Chehalis" section of the finding aid. Major items of significance include Boas's Upper Chehalis field notebooks, recorded in 1927 near Oakville, Washington, containing vocabulary, paradigms, and texts with interlinear translations. Additional loose notes contains numerous stories, which partially derive from the field notebooks. Also noteworthy is an extensive lexical file of over 8,000 slips derived from Boas's field work, partially arranged and analyzed. Earlier materials relating to the Lower Chehalis dialect were recorded circa 1890 by Boas at Shoalwater Bay, as well as material copied from Myron Eells' 1880s field work and later corrected by Boas. Other smaller items, such as Aginsky's comparison of Upper Chehalis and Puyallup, consist primarily of linguistic analysis and some ethnographic information. The names of Chehalis speakers and consultants who made the work possible are not fully reflected in the cataloging, as many are typically not identified by Boas.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Clackamas
Alternate forms: Klackamas
Language(s): English | Chinook, Upper
Date: 1890-1894; 1920
Type:Text
Extent: 2 pages; 2 notebooks; circa 65 slips
Description: The Clackamas materials in the ACLS collection include two items in the "Clackamas" section of the finding aid: a 2-page fragment of a Clackamas-English vocabulary, and a brief slip file contaiining kinship terms. Two notebooks recorded by Franz Boas in 1890 which partially contain Clackamas texts and vocabularies are found in the "Field notes on Chinookan and Salishan languages and Gitamat], Molala, and Masset " in the "Chinook" section of the finding aid. In the "Kathlamet" section, the "Kathlamet lexicon" includes some comparative Clackamas terms.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Cochiti
Alternate forms: Kotyit
Date: 1919-1940, 1957
Type:Text
Extent: 552 pages, 6 notebooks
Description: The Cochiti materials in the ACLS collection consist of several items in multiple sections of the finding aid. In the "Cochiti" section of the finding aid, there is a set of 5 field notebooks recorded by Boas in 1921-1922 containing his original field notes, texts, Vocabularies, paradigms, and notes in German shorthand. A second set of loose-leaf notes consists of texts with interlinear translations derived from the notebooks, 20 of which were later rendered into free translations by Ruth Benedict and published in 1931. In the "Keresan" section, Boas' "Keresan word list and linguistic notes" contains 8 folders of Laguna and Cochiti grammatical, linguistic, folkloristic, and ethnographic materials. His "Keresan lexical file" contains 8,000 Keresan terms, with some references to manuscripts from which they were derived, many of which are likely Cochiti. (This file may contain Western Keres as well.) In the "Laguna" section of the finding aid, Boas' "Laguna Vocabularies and texts" includes Keresan, Laguna, and Cochiti Vocabularies, grammatical notes, and texts. Lastly, in the "Tewa" section, "Cochiti and San Juan Pueblo songs" contains words, music, paraphrase of text, lists of ceremonial terms, and a "Phonologic chart for Cochiti Keresan and Tewa-Tanoan." NOTE: Portions of this material may be restricted due to potential cultural sensitivity.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Coeur d'Alene | Spokane
Alternate forms: Schitsu'umsh
Language(s): Coeur d'Alene | English
Date: 1908; Circa 1910; 1930s
Type:Text
Extent: 435 pages; 1 notebook
Description: The Coeur d'Alene materials in the ACLS collection consist mainly of 3 items in the "Coeur d'Alene" section of the finding aid. One is Reichard's "Coeur d'Alene Indian texts," containing 51 texts without translations. Two items recorded by James Teit consist of Coeur d'Alene vocabularies, some relating to material culture and religion. In the "Nlaka'pamux" section of the finding aid, Teit's "Field notes or Thompson and neighboring Salish languages" includes some Coeur d'Alene information, though the extent is undetermined as these notebooks have not yet been fully indexed. "Suffixes in Thompson" contains some incidental Coeur d'Alene terms written in.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Comox | Kwakwaka'wakw | Pentlatch
Alternate forms: Ayeahjuthum, Catloltq, Éy7á7juuthem, Island Comox, K'omoks, Sliammon
Language(s): Comox | English | German | Pentlatch
Date: Circa 1890, 1900, Circa 1910, 1934
Type:Text
Extent: 201 pages, 2 maps
Description: The Comox materials in the ACLS collection consist of several items relating to the Island Comox dialect, located in multiple sections of the finding aid. The primary material is in the "Comox" section of the finding aid, where there are two items recorded by Franz Boass. From 1890, there is "Comox-Satlolk materials" in German and English with Comox vocabulary and text with interlinear German translation, along with Satlolk-English vocabulary. "Comox and Pentlatch texts" contains texts with interlinear translations, most typed up from earlier fieldwork. In the "Pentlatch" section, "Pentlatch materials" contains 1 page of miscellaneous Island Comox sentences. In the "Salish" section, "Comparative vocabularies of eight Salishan languages" includes Comox vocabulary derived from fieldwork and compared with other Salish languages. Finally, in the "Kwakiutl" section of the finding aid, "Maps of Vancouver Island, with Kwakiutl place names" (item W1a.11) includes some maps with Comox place names. "Kwakiutl ethnographic materials" (item 31) includes small amounts of occasional reference to Comox matters pertaining to their relations with the southern Kwakwaka'wakw tribes.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Dakota | Lakota
Alternate forms: Dakhota, Lakhota, Santee, Sioux, Teton, Yankton
Language(s): Dakota | English | Lakota
Date: 1838-1938 (bulk 1930s)
Type:Text
Extent: 7500+ pages, 3300+ slips; 2 notebooks
Description: The Dakota and Lakota materials in the ACLS collection consist of a very large and diverse set of materials, and are located in the "Dakota" section of the finding aid, which provides a detailed listing of all contents. The vast majority of these materials were composed and assembled by Ella Deloria during the 1930s, both recorded from contemporary speakers and from various historical manuscript sources, which were sent to Franz Boas. The bulk of Deloria's materials are stories and speeches in typewritten manuscript form, with a transcription in the original language, followed by a literal word-for-word translation, then a free translation in English, and a section of footnotes commenting upon the original text and translation decisions. Some of her manuscripts occasionally lack one or more of these sections. These texts cover a wide range of topics, from traditional narratives, historical accounts, autobiographical stories, descriptions of games, customs, ceremonies, etc., and speeches, often concerning political affairs and economic conditions from the late-19th century to the 1930s. Names of numerous speakers are also given in the manuscripts themselves. Some of these materials were published, but most were not. Note that Deloria identifies the language recorded by using the terms "Teton" for Lakota language, and "Santee" and "Yankton" to indicate Eastern and Western dialects of Dakota language. The collection also includes a much smaller amount of material by Boas and others, primarily consisting of linguistics notes and musical analysis. A full list of places where the material was recorded has not yet been assembled.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Dakota | Lakota
Alternate forms: Sioux, Teton
Language(s): Dakota | English | Lakota
Date: circa 1930s
Type:Text
Extent: 8 folders
Description: The Dakota and Lakota materials in the Franz Boas Professional Papers consist of 8 items. Six of these items are listed under "Boas, Franz--Dakota Languages" and pertain to various linguistic features, inclussing an incomplete glossary. See also "Dakota Indians - The story of the beginning as told in the Wakan Wacipi of Dakota" and "Deloria, Ella - Report for Dr. Boas, re: Capitalism and the Dakota-Sioux."
Collection: Franz Boas Personal and Professional Papers (Mss.B.B61p)

Haida
Language(s): English | Haida | Tlingit
Date: 1890, 1893, 1900-1911, 1915
Type:Text
Extent: 3000+ pages, 1400+ cards, 3 notebooks
Description: The Haida material in the ACLS collection consists of numerous materials that are primarily located in the "Haida" section of the finding aid. See this section for a complete listing. Prominent materials in this section includes Swanton's typescript draft versions of Haida stories from both Masset and Skidegate, recorded in 1900-1902. These versions are in Haida only, with some handwritten annotations, corrections, and English titles. Many were published, though not all. Notably, these manuscript include the Haida version of stories published in English only in Swanton's "Haida Texts and Myths--Skidegate dialect." Also included in this section are lexical files by Boas and Sapir derived from Boas and Swanton's materials. In the "Athapaskan" section of the finding aid, see Sapir's "Comparative Na-Dene dictionary," which includes extensive Haida material. In the "Chinook" section of the finding aid, see Boas' "Field notes on Chinookan and Salishan languages and Gitamat, Molala, and Masset," which includes vocabularies recorded in 1890, likely in Victoria, from a Haida speaker from Masset. In the "Tlingit" section of the finding aid, see Swanton's "Tlingit and Haida word list," including Haida vocabulary recorded at Howkan, Klinkwan, and Kassan.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Winnebago
Language(s): English | Ho-Chunk
Date: 1938-1939
Type:Text
Extent: 281 pages, 11 notebooks
Description: The Ho-Chunk materials in the ACLS collection consists primarily of three items in the "Winnebago (Ho-Chunk)" section of the finding aid. The bulk of the material is Amelia Susman's 11 field notebooks, which contains texts with interlinear translation, Vocabularies, ethnographical and linguistic notes, and some songs. Two additional items also by Susman are extended analyses based upon field work with Sam Blowsnake and wife: "The accentual system of Winnebago" and "The Winnebago syllabary." In the "Chiwere (Iowa)" section of the finding aid, Gordon Marsh's "Materials for a study of the Iowa Indian language" include some Ho-Chunk grammatical notes, and Ho-Chunk cognates with Chiwere. Lastly, in the "Dakota" section, Franz Boas' "Miscellaneous Dakota notes" (item X8a.3) includes a Dakota-Ho-Chunk comparative word list.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Hopi
Language(s): English | Hopi
Date: 1915; 1933-1941
Type:Text
Extent: 2 slips; 300+ pages
Description: The Hopi materials in the ACLS collection consist of materials primarily in the "Hopi" section of the finding aid. The earliest item is a brief word list recorded by Edward Sapir. The remaining items in this section are all by Benjamin Lee Whorf, including an initial linguistic report sent to Sapir, a grammatical sketch, an interlinear text on marriage customs, and a brief discussion of verb classes. In the "Bella Bella (Heiltsuk)" section of the finding aid, Boas' "Bella Bella suffix list" includes Hopi ethnographic materials on ceremony and religion written on the reverse side of sheets.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)